Social Science in the Making

Paul U. Kellogg, "Field Work of the Pittsburgh Survey," Appendix E in The Pittsburgh District: Civic Frontage (The Pittsburgh Survey, 6 vols., ed. Paul U. Kellogg, [New York: Survey Associates, 1914]), p. 495, quoted in John F. McClymer ...

Social Science in the Making

"Together, the historical essays in this volume provide the best account of how the Foundation moved away from its roots as a policy think tank.... This book of essays is the only extended treatment of the Foundation's history that includes both its distinguished early years and its emergence after World War II as the principal private foundation devoted to strengthening basic research in the social sciences." —ERIC WANNER, president of the Russell Sage Foundation, in his foreword to the volume

Atlantic Crossings

Paul U. Kellogg, "Two-Edged: Sword or Ploughshare," Survey Graphic 29 (1940): 242 ff.; Paul U. Kellogg, "The British Labor Offensive," Survey 39 (1918): 585-588; Paul U Kellogg, "American Labor Out of It," ibid., pp. 617-626; Paul U.

Atlantic Crossings


The Social Survey in Historical Perspective 1880 1940

From November 1912 until its closure the editor (of both publications) was Paul U. Kellogg. See Library of Congress Catalogue and Clarke A. Chambers, Paul U. Kellogg and the Survey : Voices for Social Welfare and Social Justice ...

The Social Survey in Historical Perspective  1880 1940

This 2001 book traces the history of the social Survey in Britain and the US, with two chapters on Germany and France. It discusses the aims and interests of those who carried out early surveys, and the links between the social survey and the growth of empirical social science.

Welfare in Review

Paul U. Kellogg and The Survey : Voices for Social Welfare and Social Justice , by Clarke A. Chambers . University of Minnesota Press , 1971 , 283 pp . , $ 10 . ABOUT 7 YEARS AGO Clarke Chambers visited me to talk about The Survey and ...

Welfare in Review


Pittsburgh Surveyed

The latter was reabsorbed into the Survey in 1948 , on the retirement of Paul Kellogg , who had been editor since 1912. See Chambers , Paul U. Kellogg and the Survey . 14. Chambers , Paul U. Kellogg and the Survey , 105 . 15.

Pittsburgh Surveyed

From 1909-1914 the Pittsburgh Survey brought together statisticans, social workers, engineers, lawyers, physicians, economists, and city planners to study the effects of industrialization on the city of Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh Surveyed examines the accuracy and the impact of the influential Pittsburgh Survey, emphasizing its role in the social reform movement of the early twentieth century.

Lewis Hine as Social Critic

Paul U. Kellogg , " Appendix E : Field Work of the Pittsburgh Survey " in Kellogg , ed . , The Pittsburgh Survey in Six Volumes , 493 . 15. Cohen , " Industrial Democracy to Professional Adjustment : The Development of Industrial ...

Lewis Hine as Social Critic

This is the first full-length examination of Lewis H. Hine (1874-1940), the intellectual and aesthetic father of social documentary photography. Kate Sampsell-Willmann assesses Hine's output through the lens of his photographs, his political and philosophical ideologies, and his social and aesthetic commitments to the dignity of labor and workers. Using Hine's images, published articles, and private correspondence, Lewis Hine as Social Critic places the artist within the context of the Progressive Era and its associated movements and periodicals, such as the Works Progress Administration, Tennessee Valley Authority, the Chicago School of Social Work, and Rex Tugwell's American Economic Life and the Means of Its Improvement. This intellectual history, heavily illustrated with HIne's photography, compares his career and concerns with other prominent photographers of the day--Jacob Riis, Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, and Margaret Bourke-White. Through detailed analysis of how Hine's images and texts intersected with concepts of urban history and social democracy, this volume reestablishes the artist's intellectual preeminence in the development of American photography as socially conscious art.

Crystal Eastman

See Clarke A. Chambers, Paul U. Kellogg and The Survey: Voices for Social Welfare and Social Justice (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1971), 33. 10. All quotes from Edward T. Devine, “Results of the Pittsburgh Survey,” ...

Crystal Eastman

"Crystal Eastman was a central figure in many of the defining social movements of the twentieth century -- labor, feminism, internationalism, free speech, peace. She drafted America's first serious workers' compensation law. She helped found the National Woman's Party and is credited as co-author of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). She helped found the Woman's Peace Party -- today, the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) -- and the American Union Against Militarism. She co-published the Liberator magazine. And she engineered the founding the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Eastman worked side-by-side with national and international suffrage leaders, renowned progressive reformers and legislators, birth control advocates, civil rights champions, revolutionary writers and artists. She traveled with a transatlantic crowd of boundary-breakers and innovators. And in virtually every arena she entered, she was one of the most memorable women known to her allies and adversaries alike. Yet today, her legacy is oddly ambiguous. She is commemorated, paradoxically, as one of the most neglected feminist leaders in American history. This first full-length biography recovers the revealing story of a woman who attained rare political influence and left a thought-provoking legacy in ongoing struggles. The social justice issues she cared about -- gender equality and human rights, nationalism and globalization, political censorship and media control, worker benefits and family balance, and the monumental questions of war, sovereignty, force, and freedom -- remain some of the most consequential questions of our own time"--

Encyclopedia of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

See also: Kellogg, Paul Underwood; Social Settlements. Bibliography Chambers, Clarke A. Paul U. Kellogg and the Survey: Voices for Social Welfare and Social Justice. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1971.

Encyclopedia of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era

Spanning the era from the end of Reconstruction (1877) to 1920, the entries of this reference were chosen with attention to the people, events, inventions, political developments, organizations, and other forces that led to significant changes in the U.S. in that era. Seventeen initial stand-alone essays describe as many themes.

Visions of Progress

Paul L. Murphy, World War I and the Origin of Civil Liberties in the United States (New York: W. W. Norton ... Lillian D. Wald to miscellaneous, n.d. [August or September 1914], in Paul U. Kellogg Papers, Social Welfare History Archives ...

Visions of Progress

Liberals and leftists in the United States have not always been estranged from one another as they are today. Historian Doug Rossinow examines how the cooperation and the creative tension between left-wing radicals and liberal reformers advanced many of the most important political values of the twentieth century, including free speech, freedom of conscience, and racial equality. Visions of Progress chronicles the broad alliances of radical and liberal figures who were driven by a particular concept of social progress—a transformative vision in which the country would become not simply wealthier or a bit fairer but fundamentally more democratic, just, and united. Believers in this vision—from the settlement-house pioneer Jane Addams and the civil rights leader W. E. B. Du Bois in the 1890s and after, to the founders of the ACLU in the 1920s, to Minnesota Governor Floyd Olson and assorted labor-union radicals in the 1930s, to New Dealer Henry Wallace in the 1940s—belonged to a left-liberal tradition in America. They helped push political leaders, including Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Roosevelt, and Harry Truman, toward reforms that made the goals of opportunity and security real for ever more Americans. Yet, during the Cold War era of the 1950s and '60s, leftists and liberals came to view one another as enemies, and their influential alliance all but vanished. Visions of Progress revisits the period between the 1880s and the 1940s, when reformers and radicals worked together along a middle path between the revolutionary left and establishment liberalism. Rossinow takes the story up to the present, showing how the progressive connection was lost and explaining the consequences that followed. This book introduces today's progressives to their historical predecessors, while offering an ambitious reinterpretation of issues in American political history.

Women and the Trades

Paul U. Kellogg (New York: Survey Associates, Russell Sage Foundation, 1914), p. 119. 2. The Survey volumes in order of publication are: Elizabeth Beardsley Butler, Women and the Trades, Pittsburgh, 1901-1908 (New York: Charities ...

Women and the Trades

Women and the Trades has long been regarded as a masterwork in the field of social investigation. Originally published in 1909, it was one of six volumes of the path breaking Pittsburgh Survey, the first attempt in the United States to study, systematically and comprehensively, life and labor in one industrial city. No other book documents so precisely the many technological and organizational changes that transformed women's wage work in the early 1900s. Despite Pittsburgh's image as a male-oriented steel town, many women also worked for a living-rolling cigars, canning pickles, or clerking in stores. The combination of manufacturing, distribution, and communication services made the city of national economic developments. What Butler found in her visits to countless workplaces did not flatter the city, its employers, or its wage earners. With few exceptions, labor unions served the interests of skilled males. Women's jobs were rigidly segregated, low paying, usually seasonal, and always insecure. Ethnic distinctions erected powerful barriers between different groups of women, as did status hierarchies based on job function. Professor Maurine Weiner Greenwald's introduction provides biographical sketches of Butler and photographer Lewis Hine and examines the validity of Butler's assumptions and findings, especially with regard to protective legislation, women worker's “passivity,” and working-class family strategies.

Gentlemen Bankers

Clarke A. Chambers, Paul U. Kellogg and the Survey: Voices for Social Welfare and Socialjustice (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1971): 7, 84. 89. Given that the issue was published during the war, it was a direct comment on ...

Gentlemen Bankers

Gentlemen Bankers focuses on the social and economic circles of one of America’s most renowned and influential financiers, J. P. Morgan, to tell a closely focused story of how economic and political interests intersected with personal rivalries and friendships among the Wall Street aristocracy during the first half of the twentieth century.

Encyclopedia of Social Welfare History in North America

The Survey hailed the New Deal , but eventually became critical of it for not establishing more comprehensive programs . During the 1940s , circulation decreased as The Survey struggled to define its focus and faced Paul U. Kellogg ...

Encyclopedia of Social Welfare History in North America

This encyclopedia provides readers with basic information about the history of social welfare in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. The intent of the encyclopedia is to provide readers with information about how these three nations have dealt with social welfare issues, some similar across borders, others unique, as well as to describe important events, developments, and the lives and work of some key contributors to social welfare developments.

From a Gadfly to a Hornet

Clarke A. Chambers, Paul U. Kellogg and The Survey: Voices for Social Welfare and Social Justice (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1971), 7-32; and Frank Luther Mott, A History of American Magazines, 1885-1905, IV (Cambridge, ...

From a Gadfly to a Hornet


The Chicago School of Sociology

13. C. A. Chambers, Paul U. Kellogg and the Survey (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1971). See also Steven R. Cohen, "Reconciling Industrial Conflict and Democracy: The Pittsburgh Survey and the Growth of Social Research in ...

The Chicago School of Sociology

From 1915 to 1935 the inventive community of social scientists at the University of Chicago pioneered empirical research and a variety of qualitative and quantitative methods, shaping the future of twentieth-century American sociology and related fields as well. Martin Bulmer's history of the Chicago school of sociology describes the university's role in creating research-based and publication-oriented graduate schools of social science. "This is an important piece of work on the history of sociology, but it is more than merely historical: Martin Bulmer's undertaking is also to explain why historical events occurred as they did, using potentially general theoretical ideas. He has studied what he sees as the period, from 1915 to 1935, when the 'Chicago School' most flourished, and defines the nature of its achievements and what made them possible . . . It is likely to become the indispensible historical source for its topic."—Jennifer Platt, Sociology

Spectres of 1919

For more on Kellogg, particularly his advocacy of Woodrow Wilson's brand of self-determination, see Clarke A. Chambers, Paul U. Kellogg and the “Survey”: Voices for Social Welfare and Social Justice ...

Spectres of 1919

With the New Negro movement and the Harlem Renaissance, the 1920s was a landmark decade in African American political and cultural history, characterized by an upsurge in racial awareness and artistic creativity. In Spectres of 1919 Barbara Foley traces the origins of this revolutionary era to the turbulent year 1919, identifying the events and trends in American society that spurred the black community to action and examining the forms that action took as it evolved. Unlike prior studies of the Harlem Renaissance, which see 1919 as significant mostly because of the geographic migrations of blacks to the North, Spectres of 1919 looks at that year as the political crucible from which the radicalism of the 1920s emerged. Foley draws from a wealth of primary sources, taking a bold new approach to the origins of African American radicalism and adding nuance and complexity to the understanding of a fascinating and vibrant era.

Civic Engagement

On Kellogg : Clarke A. Chambers , Paul U. Kellogg and the Survey : Voices of Social Welfare and Social Justice ( Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press , 1971 ) , 16 , 25 , 18 , 42 , passim . 36. " microcosm .

Civic Engagement

"John Louis Recchiuti recounts the history of a vibrant network of young American scholars and social activists who helped transform a city and a nation. In this study, Recchiuti focuses on more than a score of Progressive reformers, including Florence Kelley, W. E. B. Du Bois, E. R. A. Seligman, Charles Beard, Franz Boaz, Frances Perkins, Samuel Lindsay, Edward Devine, Mary Simkhovitch, and George Edmund Haynes. He reminds us how people from markedly diverse backgrounds forged a movement to change a city, and beyond it, a nation."--BOOK JACKET.

Poverty Ethnicity and the American City 1840 1925

120 Mary Bacha , “ The Pittsburgh Survey of the National Publication Committee of Charities and Commons , ” The Survey 19 ( 1908 ) : 1665–70 ; Paul U. Kellogg , “ Boston's Level Best - The 1915 Movement and the Work of Civic Organizing ...

Poverty  Ethnicity and the American City  1840 1925

David Ward examines the geographical relationship between migrants and the inner city and the creation of slums and ghettos.

Bodies of Work

47 Kellogg, ''Field Work of the Pittsburgh Survey,'' in The Pittsburgh District: Civic Frontage, 492; Chambers, Paul U. Kellogg and the Survey, 33–35. 48 Crystal Eastman, Work-Accidents and the Law, 3–4, 11, 15.

Bodies of Work

By the end of the nineteenth century, Pittsburgh emerged as a major manufacturing center in the United States. Its rise as a leading producer of steel, glass, and coal was fueled by machine technology and mass immigration, developments that fundamentally changed the industrial workplace. Because Pittsburgh’s major industries were almost exclusively male and renowned for their physical demands, the male working body came to symbolize multiple often contradictory narratives about strength and vulnerability, mastery and exploitation. In Bodies of Work, Edward Slavishak explores how Pittsburgh and the working body were symbolically linked in civic celebrations, the research of social scientists, the criticisms of labor reformers, advertisements, and workers’ self-representations. Combining labor and cultural history with visual culture studies, he chronicles a heated contest to define Pittsburgh’s essential character at the turn of the twentieth century, and he describes how that contest was conducted largely through the production of competing images. Slavishak focuses on the workers whose bodies came to epitomize Pittsburgh, the men engaged in the arduous physical labor demanded by the city’s metals, glass, and coal industries. At the same time, he emphasizes how conceptions of Pittsburgh as quintessentially male limited representations of women in the industrial workplace. The threat of injury or violence loomed large for industrial workers at the turn of the twentieth century, and it recurs throughout Bodies of Work: in the marketing of artificial limbs, statistical assessments of the physical toll of industrial capitalism, clashes between labor and management, the introduction of workplace safety procedures, and the development of a statewide workmen’s compensation system.

Lives of Their Own

Brody , Steel Workers in America , 55 ; John A. Fitch , The Steel Workers , The Pittsburgh Survey , ed . Paul U. Kellogg ( New York , 1910 ) , 14 . 14. Fitch , Steel Workers , 39. Fitch conducted interviews with 145 men between 1907-8 .

Lives of Their Own

Lives of Their Own depicts the strikingly different lives of black, Italian, and Polish immigrants in Pittsburgh. Within a comparative framework, the book focuses on the migration process itself, job procurement, and occupational mobility, family structure, home-ownership, and neighborhood institutions. By blending oral histories with quantitative data, the authors have created a convincing multilayered portrait of working-class life in one of our great industrial cities.