Peace Journalism, War and Conflict Resolution

Peace Journalism, War and Conflict Resolution

Peace Journalism, War and Conflict Resolution draws together the work of over twenty leading international writers, journalists, theorists and campaigners in the field of peace journalism. Mainstream media tend to promote the interests of the military and governments in their coverage of warfare. This major new text aims to provide a definitive, up-to-date, critical, engaging and accessible overview exploring the role of the media in conflict resolution. Sections focus in detail on theory, international practice, and critiques of mainstream media performance from a peace perspective; countries discussed include the U.S., U.K., Germany, Cyprus, Sweden, Canada, India, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea and the Philippines. Chapters examine a wide variety of issues including mainstream newspapers, indigenous media, blogs and radical alternative websites. The book includes a foreword by award-winning investigative journalist John Pilger and a critical afterword by cultural commentator Jeffery Klaehn.

Peace Journalism

Peace Journalism

Peace Journalism explains how most coverage of conflict unwittingly fuels further violence, and proposes workable options to give peace a chance.

Peace Journalism in Times of War

Volume 13: Peace and Policy

Peace Journalism in Times of War

Amid the ongoing and volatile debate over the nature and potential of peace journalism, this volume presents visionary insights from some of the most prominent scholars in the fi eld. Th e signifi cant empirical studies included here will provide foundation data for communication studies. Th e contributors broaden the purview and terrain of peace journalism to include new media, and off ers essays on the eff ects and the content of global communications. In sum, the thirteenth volume of Peace and Policy deepens our empirical knowledge of the nature and eff ects of confl ict, while underscoring the increase in numbers of participants and breadth of communications.

Debates in Peace Journalism

Debates in Peace Journalism

In Debates in Peace Journalism, Jake Lynch traces the major controversies in this emerging field - philosophical, pedagogical and professional - and links his own contributions to them with important new material. The book is intended for those wishing to immerse themselves in the main conceptual currents of peace journalism, and to navigate their own path around some of its rocks and shoals.

Expanding Peace Journalism

Comparative and Critical Approaches

Expanding Peace Journalism

This major new text explores and interrogates peace journalism as a significant challenge to this hegemonic discourse, which has been advocated and elaborated over the recent years in journalism, media development and academic spheres. J Lynch, University of Sydney.

Reporting Conflict

New Directions in Peace Journalism

Reporting Conflict

Introducing a compelling new series that offers leading international thinking on conflict and peacebuilding. Journalists control our access to news. By pitching stories from particular angles, the media decides the issues for public debate. In Reporting Conflict, one of two inaugural titles in the New Approaches to Peace and Conflict series, Jake Lynch and Johan Galtung challenge reporters to tell the real story of conflicts around the world. The dominant kind of conflict reporting is what Lynch and Galtung call war journalism: conflicts are seen as good versus evil, and the score is kept with body counts. The media's handling of 9/11 and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq highlight the one-sided reporting that war journalism creates. Peace journalism uses a broader lens: why not report what caused the conflict, and how it might be resolved? Lynch and Galtung show how journalists could have reported the Korean War, the NATO bombing in Kosovo and the first Gulf War, sparking a more informed discussion of these important issues. This provocative book is essential reading for everyone who wants the media to tell the whole truth about conflict.

Peace Journalism Principles and Practices

Responsibly Reporting Conflicts, Reconciliation, and Solutions

Peace Journalism Principles and Practices

Long-time peace journalist Steven Youngblood presents the foundations of peace journalism in this exciting new textbook, offering readers the methods, approaches, and concepts required to use journalism as a tool for peace, reconciliation, and development. Guidance is offered on framing stories, ethical treatment of sensitive subjects, and avoiding polarizing stereotypes through a range of international examples and case studies spanning from the Iraq war to the recent unrest in Ferguson, Missouri. Youngblood teaches students to interrogate traditional media narratives about crime, race, politics, immigration, and civil unrest, and to illustrate where—and how—a peace journalism approach can lead to more responsible and constructive coverage, and even assist in the peace process itself.

Peace Journalism in East Africa

A Manual for Media Practitioners

Peace Journalism in East Africa

This concise edited collection explores the practice of peace journalism in East Africa, focusing specifically on the unique political and economic contexts of Uganda and Kenya. The book offers a refreshing path towards transformative journalism in East Africa through imbibing pan-African institutional methodological approaches and the African philosophies of Utu (humanity), Umoja (unity) and Harambee (collective responsibility) as news values. Contributions from key academics demonstrate how media practices that are supportive of peace can prevent the escalation of conflict and promote its nonviolent resolution. The chapters cumulatively represent a rich repertoire of experiences and cases that skillfully tell the story of the connections between media and peacebuilding in East Africa, while also avoiding romanticizing peace journalism as an end to itself or using it as an excuse for censorship. This cutting-edge research book is a valuable resource for academics in journalism, media studies, communication, peace and conflict studies, and sociology.