Performing Commedia dell Arte 1570 1630

This book is winner of Ennio Flaiano Award in Italianistica, 2020. Chapters include one on why, what, and how actors improvised, one on acting styles, including dialects, voice and gesture; and one on masks and their uses and importance.

Performing Commedia dell Arte  1570 1630

Performing Commedia dell’Arte, 1570-1630 explores the performance techniques employed in commedia dell’arte and the ways in which they served to rapidly spread the ideas that were to form the basis of modern theatre throughout Europe. Chapters include one on why, what, and how actors improvised, one on acting styles, including dialects, voice and gesture; and one on masks and their uses and importance. These chapters on historical performance are followed by a coda on commedia dell’arte today. Together they offer readers a look at both past and present iterations of these performances. Suitable for both scholars and performers, Performing Commedia dell’Arte, 1570-1630 bears on essential questions about the techniques of performance and their utility for this important theatrical form.

Commedia dell Arte and the Mediterranean

1564–1568, performed in 1587), which he sees as forerunners to commedia dell' arte. ... 47 Daniel Vitkus, Turning Turk: English Theater and the Multicultural Mediterranean, 15701630 (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003), 28.

Commedia dell  Arte and the Mediterranean

Drawing on published collections and also manuscripts from Mantuan archives, Commedia dell' arte and the Mediterranean locates commedia dell' arte as a performance form reflective of its cultural crucible in the Mediterranean. The study provides a broad perspective on commedia dell’ arte as an expression of the various cultural, gender and language communities in Italy during the early-modern period, and explores the ways in which the art form offers a platform for reflection on power and cultural exchange. While highlighting the prevalence of Mediterranean crossings in the scenarios of commedia dell' arte, this book examines the way in which actors embodied characters from across the wider Mediterranean region. The presence of Mediterranean minority groups such as Arabs, Armenians, Jews and Turks within commedia dell' arte is marked on stage and 'backstage' where they were collaborators in the creative process. In addition, gendered performances by the first female actors participated in 'staging' the Mediterranean by using the female body as a canvas for cartographical imaginings. By focusing attention on the various communities involved in the making of theatre, a central preoccupation of the book is to question the dynamics of 'exchange' as it materialized within a spectrum inclusive of both cultural collaboration but also of taxation and coercion.

Renaissance Drama 38

t was priNCipally improvisation that made commedia dell'arte performance famous. improvisation provided a unique ... than any other single text has done.2 scala's collection represents commedia dell'arte at its height, 15701630, ...

Renaissance Drama 38

Renaissance Drama, an annual interdisciplinary publication, is devoted to drama and performance as a central feature of Renaissance culture. The essays in each volume explore the traditional canon of drama, the significance of performance, broadly construed, to early modern culture, and the impact of new forms of interpretation on the study of Renaissance plays, theater, and performance. Volume 38 includes essays that explore topics in early modern drama ranging from Shakespeare’s Jewish questions in The Merchant of Venice and the gender of rhetoric in Shakespeare’s sonnets and Jonson’s plays to improvisation in the commedia dell’arte and the rebirth of tragedy in 1940 Germany.

Italian Culture in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

reali« as well as comedies.10 Quite contrary to the common perception that the commedia dell'arte performed only farce, ... age« of 1570¥1630 was preceded by a wilder strain of virtuosity, one that ran counter to the mimetic art of ...

Italian Culture in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

Applying recent developments in new historicism and cultural materialism - along with the new perspectives opened up by the current debate on intertextuality and the construction of the theatrical text - the essays collected here reconsider the pervasive influence of Italian culture, literature, and traditions on early modern English drama. The volume focuses strongly on Shakespeare but also includes contributions on Marston, Middleton, Ford, Brome, Aretino, and other early modern dramatists. The pervasive influence of Italian culture, literature, and traditions on the European Renaissance, it is argued here, offers a valuable opportunity to study the intertextual dynamics that contributed to the construction of the Elizabethan and Jacobean theatrical canon. In the specific area of theatrical discourse, the drama of the early modern period is characterized by the systematic appropriation of a complex Italian iconology, exploited both as the origin of poetry and art and as the site of intrigue, vice, and political corruption. Focusing on the construction and the political implications of the dramatic text, this collection analyses early modern English drama within the context of three categories of cultural and ideological appropriation: the rewriting, remaking, and refashioning of the English theatrical tradition in its iconic, thematic, historical, and literary aspects.

Performance and Literature in the Commedia Dell Arte

At the same time , beginning in the 1570s there were certain actors who were influenced by the aesthetic of mimesis and ... Except for occasional ventures to Naples and Rome , the major itineraries between 1570 and 1630 were northern ...

Performance and Literature in the Commedia Dell Arte

This book explores the commedia dell'arte: the Italian professional theatre in Shakespeare's time. The actors of this theatre usually did not perform from scripted drama but instead improvised their performances from a shared plot and thorough knowledge of individual character roles. Robert Henke closely analyzes hitherto unexamined commedia dell'arte texts in order to demonstrate how the spoken word and written literature were fruitfully combined in performance. Henke examines a number of primary sources including performance accounts, actors' contracts, and letters, among other documents.

Seventeenth Century Opera and the Sound of the Commedia dell Arte

An obvious example is the scholarship surrounding the so-called madrigal comedy, which merges commedia dell'arte characters and scene fragments with ... Gonzagas in Mantua (15701630): http://www.capitalespettacolo.it/eng/ric _gen.asp.

Seventeenth Century Opera and the Sound of the Commedia dell   Arte

In this book, Emily Wilbourne boldly traces the roots of early opera back to the sounds of the commedia dell’arte. Along the way, she forges a new history of Italian opera, from the court pieces of the early seventeenth century to the public stages of Venice more than fifty years later. Wilbourne considers a series of case studies structured around the most important and widely explored operas of the period: Monteverdi’s lost L’Arianna, as well as his Il Ritorno d’Ulisse and L’incoronazione di Poppea; Mazzochi and Marazzoli’s L’Egisto, ovvero Chi soffre speri; and Cavalli’s L’Ormindo and L’Artemisia. As she demonstrates, the sound-in-performance aspect of commedia dell’arte theater—specifically, the use of dialect and verbal play—produced an audience that was accustomed to listening to sonic content rather than simply the literal meaning of spoken words. This, Wilbourne suggests, shaped the musical vocabularies of early opera and facilitated a musicalization of Italian theater. Highlighting productive ties between the two worlds, from the audiences and venues to the actors and singers, this work brilliantly shows how the sound of commedia performance ultimately underwrote the success of opera as a genre.

The Politics of Interweaving Performance Cultures

Commedia dell'arte: Popular form of Italianlanguage theatre prevalent especially between 1570 and 1630. Commedia dell'arteis characterized by masked 'types' and improvised performances based onscenarios.

The Politics of Interweaving Performance Cultures

This book provides a timely intervention in the fields of performance studies and theatre history, and to larger issues of global cultural exchange. The authors offer a provocative argument for rethinking the scholarly assessment of how diverse performative cultures interact, how they are interwoven, and how they are dependent upon each other. While the term ‘intercultural theatre’ as a concept points back to postcolonialism and its contradictions, The Politics of Interweaving Performance Cultures explores global developments in the performing arts that cannot adequately be explained and understood using postcolonial theory. The authors challenge the dichotomy ‘the West and the rest’ – where Western cultures are ‘universal’ and non-Western cultures are ‘particular’ – as well as ideas of national culture and cultural ownership. This volume uses international case studies to explore the politics of globalization, looking at new paternalistic forms of exchange and the new inequalities emerging from it. These case studies are guided by the principle that processes of interweaving performance cultures are, in fact, political processes. The authors explore the inextricability of the aesthetic and the political, whereby aesthetics cannot be perceived as opposite to the political; rather, the aesthetic is the political. Helen Gilbert’s essay ‘Let the Games Begin: Pageants, Protests, Indigeneity (1968–2010)’won the 2015 Marlis Thiersch Prize for best essay from the Australasian Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies Association.

The Relationship of Oral and Literate Performance Processes in the Commedia Dell arte

It may , perhaps , seem strange , talking about the years between 1570-1630 , that I should be so bold as to cite the ... past that corresponded in full measure with the early hey - day of Commedia dell'arte ( Erenstein 1989 , p.125 ) .

The Relationship of Oral and Literate Performance Processes in the Commedia Dell arte

This study argues that the performers who developed the commedia dell'arte in the 16th century did so by applying oral story-telling techniques to a multi-performer genre.

The Routledge Companion to Commedia dell Arte

Although leading troupes in particular could perform scripted as well as improvised pieces, the majority worked for the ... 15701630) that we know most, some independent, some associated closely with courts, their names reflective of a ...

The Routledge Companion to Commedia dell Arte

From Commedia dell’Arte came archetypal characters that are still with us today, such as Harlequin and Pantalone, and the rediscovered craft of writing comic dramas and masked theatre. From it came the forces that helped create and influence Opera, Ballet, Pantomime, Shakespeare, Moliere, Lopes de Vega, Goldoni, Meyerhold, and even the glove puppet, Mr Punch. The Routledge Companion to Commedia dell’Arte is a wide-ranging volume written by over 50 experts, that traces the history, characteristics, and development of this fascinating yet elusive theatre form. In synthesizing the elements of Commedia, this book introduces the history of the Sartori mask studio; presents a comparison between Gozzi and Goldoni’s complicated and adversarial approaches to theatre; invites discussions on Commedia’s relevance to Shakespeare, and illuminates re-interpretations of Commedia in modern times. The authors are drawn from actors, mask-makers, pedagogues, directors, trainers and academics, all of whom add unique insights into this most delightful of theatre styles. Notable contributions include: • Donato Sartori on the 20th century Sartori mask • Rob Henke on form and freedom • Anna Cottis on Carlo Boso • Didi Hopkins on One Man, Two Guv’nors • Kenneth Richards on acting companies • Antonio Fava on Pulcinella • Joan Schirle on Carlo Mazzone-Clementi and women in Commedia • and M.A. Katritzky on images Olly Crick is a performer, trainer and director, having trained in Commedia under Barry Grantham and Carlo Boso. He is founder of The Fabulous Old Spot Theatre Company. Judith Chaffee is Associate Professor of Theatre at Boston University, and Head of Movement Training for Actors. She trained in Commedia with Antonio Fava, Julie Goell, Stanley Allen Sherman, and Carlos Garcia Estevez.

Repertory Migration in the Czech Crown Lands 1570 1630

Chapter 1, "The Music Book Market in Bohemia and Moravia," gives a broad account of the transmission of musical texts in manuscript and print, including studies of local printers, the distribution of music books printed in Germany and ...

Repertory Migration in the Czech Crown Lands  1570 1630

This dissertation studies the production and transmission of musical repertories in the Czech Crown Lands between 1570 and 1630. The region had long been closely linked to bordering lands, but immigration from other countries to the region escalated in the final decades of the sixteenth century with the arrival of the imperial court in Prague, particularly from Spain, Italy, and the Low Lands. The period I have chosen for study thus encompasses this time of unusually intensive travel, migration, and cultural exchange, with the reign of Archduke Ferdinand of Tyrol as King of Bohemia at the beginning, and the start of the Thirty Years War at its end. My object has been to track cultural movement and the mobility of musicians, performance styles, and genres that accompanied and even precipitated it. I treat music at the court of the Habsburgs and the tastes we can presume reigned there among the international group of nobles that made up court society. But as a work of cultural history, this study also reaches out beyond the Rudolfine court to take stock of the broader cultural terrain of the Czech Crown Lands. Chapter 1, "The Music Book Market in Bohemia and Moravia," gives a broad account of the transmission of musical texts in manuscript and print, including studies of local printers, the distribution of music books printed in Germany and Venice, booksellers in Prague and beyond, and what we can discern of the collecting of music by literary brotherhoods, Latin schools, churches, monasteries, and private individuals not directly associated with the court. Chapter 2, "Italians in Bohemia," circles in closer to the court and its strikingly Italianate tastes in music (since many nobles studied abroad in Italy). I begin with a brief history of Prague's substantial Italian community, which included stonemasons, architects, and merchants in addition to the Italian musicians at court, among whom Italian trumpeters held a particular monopoly. The core of the chapter studies the Italianate output of court composers, both Italians and northerners, with detailed studies of madrigals by Alessandro Orologio and the canzoni napolitane of Giovannni Battista Pinello. Their local production for the court at Prague shows how they modified their approach to this Italian genre to better suit the tastes of their central European audiences, which included courtiers and consumers of print. Chapter 3, "The Reception of Italian Music in Bohemia and Moravia," takes in six decades of Italian music reception in Bohemia and Moravia with specific concentration on court culture. Beginning with the wedding of Maximilian II's daughter Anna to Philipp II, King of Spain, in 1570 and ending with the coronation of Ferdinand II's wife Eleonora Gonzaga and his son Ferdinand as King and Queen of Bohemia in 1627, I show the essential role played by monarchs and the Austrian and Czech nobility in instilling a local taste among aristocrats for Italian music and theater, including the commedia dell'arte. Chapter 4, "The Quodlibet," closes the dissertation with a study of the genre that represents the multiethnic nature of Prague and the Czech Crown Lands most vividly--the polylingual quodlibet, in which quotes from tunes popular with audiences are woven together in polyphonic settings by composers. Thus, they record not only the great variety of music that was enjoyed by consumers of polyphony--German lied, sacred songs in German and Czech, Italian villanelle and napolitane, and Latin drinking songs--but also bear witness to the convergence of these languages, musics, and the cultures they reference in what was truly one of the most densely international regions of early modern Europe.

The Cambridge History of Italian Literature

Understandably , the irreverent and sometimes offensive humour of the commedia dell'arte made it a controversial subject with ... Commedia dell'arte The period between 1570 and 1630 is considered the Golden Age of the commedia dell'arte ...

The Cambridge History of Italian Literature

Presents a comprehensive survey of Italian literature from its earliest origins to the present

Viator

LIFE ON THE STREET IN THE COMMEDIA DELL'ARTE SCENARIOS OF FLAMINIO SCALA * Natalie Crohn Schmitt Abstract : This essay ... at its height , 1570-1630 , and was the only collection to have been published in the seventeenth century .

Viator


Commedia dell Arte in Context

strikingly recapitulates the commedia family of blocking vecchio, absent mother and male and female ... Although we cannot rule out the possibility of professional Italian actors performing in London after the 1570s and before the ...

Commedia dell Arte in Context

The commedia dell'arte, the improvised Italian theatre that dominated the European stage from 1550 to 1750, is arguably the most famous theatre tradition to emerge from Europe in the early modern period. Its celebrated masks have come to symbolize theatre itself and have become part of the European cultural imagination. Over the past twenty years a revolution in commedia dell'arte scholarship has taken place, generated mainly by a number of distinguished Italian scholars. Their work, in which they have radically separated out the myth from the history of the phenomenon remains, however, largely untranslated into English (or any other language). The present volume gathers together these Italian and English-speaking scholars to synthesize for the first time this research for both specialist and non-specialist readers. The book is structured around key topics that span both the early modern period and the twentieth-century reinvention of the commedia dell'arte.

Transnational Mobilities in Early Modern Theater

... ephemeral collections of material have tended not to survive, especially from the earliest and most creative period of the genre between around 1570 and 1630. ... We know about the stories performed by the Italian professionals.

Transnational Mobilities in Early Modern Theater

The essays in this volume investigate English, Italian, Spanish, German, Czech, and Bengali early modern theater, placing Shakespeare and his contemporaries in the theatrical contexts of western and central Europe, as well as the Indian sub-continent. Contributors explore the mobility of theatrical units, genres, performance practices, visual images, and dramatic texts across geo-linguistic borders in early modern Europe. Combining 'distant' and 'close' reading, a systemic and structural approach identifies common theatrical units, or 'theatergrams' as departure points for specifying the particular translations of theatrical cultures across national boundaries. The essays engage both 'dramatic' approaches (e.g., genre, plot, action, and the dramatic text) and 'theatrical' perspectives (e.g., costume, the body and gender of the actor). Following recent work in 'mobility studies,' mobility is examined from both material and symbolic angles, revealing both ample transnational movement and periodic resistance to border-crossing. Four final essays attend to the practical and theoretical dimensions of theatrical translation and adaptation, and contribute to the book’s overall inquiry into the ways in which values, properties, and identities are lost, transformed, or gained in movement across geo-linguistic borders.

Seventeenth century Italian Poets and Dramatists

Seventeenth century Italian Poets and Dramatists

Essays on poets and dramatists of the seicento, the seventeenth-century period of Italian literature and art. Examines the challenge that the Baroque movement posed to the neo-Aristotelian aesthetics of the Renaissance and to the notions of decorum and morality in art.

Stagestruck

tions sweeping the performance industry in France. Yet his contemporaries also noticed the ... The first troupes of Italian actors began to stage commedia dell'arte in French cities during the 1570s. French actors soon followed their ...

Stagestruck

Stagestruck traces the making of a vibrant French theater industry between the reign of Louis XIV and the French Revolution. During this era more than eighty provincial and colonial cities celebrated the inauguration of their first public playhouses. These theaters emerged as the most prominent urban cultural institutions in prerevolutionary France, becoming key sites for the articulation and contestation of social, political, and racial relationships. Combining rich description with nuanced analysis based on extensive archival evidence, Lauren R. Clay illuminates the wide-ranging consequences of theater's spectacular growth for performers, spectators, and authorities in cities throughout France as well as in the empire's most important Atlantic colony, Saint-Domingue. Clay argues that outside Paris the expansion of theater came about through local initiative, civic engagement, and entrepreneurial investment, rather than through actions or policies undertaken by the royal government and its agents. Reconstructing the business of theatrical production, she brings to light the efforts of a wide array of investors, entrepreneurs, directors, and actors-including women and people of color-who seized the opportunities offered by commercial theater to become important agents of cultural change. Portraying a vital and increasingly consumer-oriented public sphere beyond the capital, Stagestruck overturns the long-held notion that cultural change flowed from Paris and the royal court to the provinces and colonies. This deeply researched book will appeal to historians of Europe and the Atlantic world, particularly those interested in the social and political impact of the consumer revolution and the forging of national and imperial cultural networks. In addition to theater and literary scholars, it will attract the attention of historians and sociologists who study business, labor history, and the emergence of the modern French state.

Otto Marseus Van Schrieck 1619 20 1678 and the Nature Piece

Was the Commedia dell'arte Performed by Mountebanks ?: Album amicorum Illustrations and ... 1570-1630 . Appeldoorn , 1982 . Knippenberg , H. H. " De slang in her volksgeloof . " Volkskunde new series 22 no . 1 ( 1963 ) : 57-69 Knoeffel ...

Otto Marseus Van Schrieck  1619 20 1678  and the Nature Piece


French Renaissance Comedy 1552 1630

may also be that some at least of these paintings represent not the commedia dell'arte , but performances of a commedia ... but it seems probable : the first Italian troupes in France , we know , performed in both styles of acting .

French Renaissance Comedy  1552 1630


Commedia dell arte

In Italy , this theater flourished between 1570 and 1630 , which was also the high water mark for the Italian Counter - Reformation . As with the scripted commedia grave ( serious comedy ) , pastorale , and tragicommedia that issued ...

Commedia dell arte


Harlequin on the Moon

The period from the 1570s through about 1630 is often called the golden age of commedia dell'arte , and with reason . ... Another rare painting ( page 73 ) , by an unknown Flemish artist , reveals Italian comic actors performing in a ...

Harlequin on the Moon

Commedia dell'arte is the first modern theater - inspiration to Shakespeare, Moliere, Goldoni, Mozart, and Balanchine and forerunner of the modern stage comedy. This book traces the history of commedia from its beginnings through many transformations to its rediscovery in the experimental theater of today. The depiction of commedia in the visual arts has a rich history. From Tiepolo and Watteau to Beardsley, Picasso, Hockney, and other modern masters, painters have found great resonance and meaning in the clowns and lovers of commedia. Lynne Lawner traces all these threads, unearthing rare texts of commedia plays, discovering myriad versions of the ever-fascinating Harlequin, Pierrot, Columbine, and Pulcinella, relating the gossip of courts and theaters, and revealing the ways in which these figures and their classic stories - the sly servant, the foolish soldier, the clever maid, the quack doctor - have arisen again and again in art.