Performing Salome Revealing Stories

If this carnival performance of Salomé allows every transgressive reversal, it also reveals the power of artifice as often more real than reality itself. Charles Baudelaire affirmed not only the beauty of artifice but also its ability ...

Performing Salome  Revealing Stories

With its first public live performance in Paris on 11 February 1896, Oscar Wilde's Salomé took on female embodied form that signalled the start of 'her' phenomenal journey through the history of the arts in the twentieth century. This volume explores Salome's appropriation and reincarnation across the arts - not just Wilde's heroine, nor Richard Strauss's - but Salome as a cultural icon in fin-de-siècle society, whose appeal for ever new interpretations of the biblical story still endures today. Using Salome as a common starting point, each chapter suggests new ways in which performing bodies reveal alternative stories, narratives and perspectives and offer a range and breadth of source material and theoretical approaches. The first chapter draws on the field of comparative literature to investigate the inter-artistic interpretations of Salome in a period that straddles the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the Modernist era. This chapter sets the tone for the rest of the volume, which develops specific case studies dealing with censorship, reception, authorial reputation, appropriation, embodiment and performance. As well as the Viennese premiere of Wilde's play, embodied performances of Salome from the period before the First World War are considered, offering insight into the role and agency of performers in the production and complex negotiation of meaning inherent in the role of Salome. By examining important productions of Strauss's Salome since 1945, and more recent film interpretations of Wilde's play, the last chapters explore performance as a cultural practice that reinscribes and continuously reinvents the ideas, icons, symbols and gestures that shape both the performance itself, its reception and its cultural meaning.

Performing Salome Revealing Stories

This volume explores Salome's appropriation and reincarnation across the arts - not just Wilde's heroine, nor Richard Strauss's - but Salome as a cultural icon in fin-de-siècle society, whose appeal for ever new interpretations of the ...

Performing Salome  Revealing Stories

With its first public live performance in Paris on 11 February 1896, Oscar Wilde's Salomé took on female embodied form that signalled the start of 'her' phenomenal journey through the history of the arts in the twentieth century. This volume explores Salome's appropriation and reincarnation across the arts - not just Wilde's heroine, nor Richard Strauss's - but Salome as a cultural icon in fin-de-siècle society, whose appeal for ever new interpretations of the biblical story still endures today. Using Salome as a common starting point, each chapter suggests new ways in which performing bodies reveal alternative stories, narratives and perspectives and offer a range and breadth of source material and theoretical approaches. The first chapter draws on the field of comparative literature to investigate the inter-artistic interpretations of Salome in a period that straddles the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the Modernist era. This chapter sets the tone for the rest of the volume, which develops specific case studies dealing with censorship, reception, authorial reputation, appropriation, embodiment and performance. As well as the Viennese premiere of Wilde's play, embodied performances of Salome from the period before the First World War are considered, offering insight into the role and agency of performers in the production and complex negotiation of meaning inherent in the role of Salome. By examining important productions of Strauss's Salome since 1945, and more recent film interpretations of Wilde's play, the last chapters explore performance as a cultural practice that reinscribes and continuously reinvents the ideas, icons, symbols and gestures that shape both the performance itself, its reception and its cultural meaning.

The Palgrave Handbook of Queer and Trans Feminisms in Contemporary Performance

In Performing Salome, Revealing Stories, ed. Clair Rowden, 71–98. Abingdon: Ashgate. Right Question Institute. 2020. The Question Formulation Technique. https://rig htquestion.org/education/. Accessed 19 August 2020. Walkowitz, Judith.

The Palgrave Handbook of Queer and Trans Feminisms in Contemporary Performance


Ringleaders of Redemption

... Salome and the Dance of Writing: Portraits of Mimesis in Literature (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010); Performing Salome, Revealing Stories, ed. Clair Rowden (Farnham: Ashgate, 2016); Ewa Kuryluk, Salome and Judas in the ...

Ringleaders of Redemption

In popular thought, Christianity is often figured as being opposed to dance. Conventional scholarship traces this controversy back to the Middle Ages. Throughout the medieval era, the Latin Church denounced and prohibited dancing in religious and secular realms, often aligning it with demonic intervention, lust, pride, and sacrilege. Historical sources, however, suggest that medieval dance was a complex and ambivalent phenomenon. During the High and Late Middle Ages, Western theologians, liturgists, and mystics not only tolerated dance; they transformed it into a dynamic component of religious thought and practice. This book investigates how dance became a legitimate form of devotion in Christian culture. Sacred dance functioned to gloss scripture, frame spiritual experience, and imagine the afterlife. Invoking numerous manuscript and visual sources (biblical commentaries, sermons, saints' lives, ecclesiastical statutes, mystical treatises, vernacular literature, and iconography), this book highlights how medieval dance helped shape religious identity and social stratification. Moreover, this book shows the political dimension of dance, which worked in the service of Christendom, conversion, and social cohesion. In Ringleaders of Redemption, Kathryn Dickason reveals a long tradition of sacred dance in Christianity, one that the professionalization and secularization of Renaissance dance obscured, and one that the Reformation silenced and suppressed.

Decadence in the Age of Modernism

Max Beerbohm, “A Florentine Tragedy and Salome,” Saturday Review, 16 June 1906, 751. 63. ... Anne Sivuoja-Kauppala, “Salome's Slow Dance with the Lord Chamberlain, London 1909–10,” in Performing Salome, Revealing Stories, ed.

Decadence in the Age of Modernism

Contributors: Howard J. Booth, Joseph Bristow, Ellen Crowell, Nick Freeman, Ellis Hanson, Kate Hext, Kirsten MacLeod, Kristin Mahoney, Douglas Mao, Michèle Mendelssohn, Alex Murray, Sarah Parker, Vincent Sherry

Oscar Wilde in Vienna

The Art of the Pose: Oscar Wilde's Performance Theory. Bern: Peter Lang, 2010. ... “Visions of Salome, Visions of Wilde: Critical Readings of Oscar Wilde's Salome in Early Twentieth-Century Vienna.” Performing Salome, Revealing Stories.

Oscar Wilde in Vienna

In Oscar Wilde in Vienna, Sandra Mayer examines the reception and performance history of Oscar Wilde’s dramatic works on Viennese stages from the turn of the twentieth century up to the present.

Magician of Sound

“Mourning at the Piano: Marguerite Long, Maurice Ravel, and the Performance of Grief in Interwar France. ... In Performing Salome, Revealing Stories, edited by Clair Rowden, 71–98. Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2013. Russ, Michael.

Magician of Sound

French composer Maurice Ravel was described by critics as a magician, conjurer, and illusionist. Scholars have been aware of this historical curiosity, but none so far have explained why Ravel attracted such critiques or what they might tell us about how to interpret his music. Magician of Sound examines Ravel's music through the lens of illusory experience, considering how timbre, orchestral effects, figure/ground relationships, and impressions of motion and stasis might be experienced as if they were conjuring tricks. Applying concepts from music theory, psychology, philosophy, and the history of magic, Jessie Fillerup develops an approach to musical illusion that newly illuminates Ravel's fascination with machines and creates compelling links between his music and other forms of aesthetic illusion, from painting and poetry to fiction and phantasmagoria. Fillerup analyzes scenes of enchantment and illusory effects in Ravel's most popular works, including Boléro, La Valse, Daphnis et Chloé, and Rapsodie espagnole, relating his methods and musical effects to the practice of theatrical conjurers. Drawing on a rich well of primary sources, Magician of Sound provides a new interdisciplinary framework for interpreting this enigmatic composer, linking magic and music.

Ottoman Empire and European Theatre Vol II

Performing Salome, Revealing Stories (Ashgate), and 'Music's obedient daughter' or Opera Libretto: From Source to Score (Amsterdam). A 2013 recipient of a three-year SSHRC Insight Grant, her current research project is on “Haydn, ...

Ottoman Empire and European Theatre Vol  II

The Time of Joseph Haydn: From Sultan Mahmud I to Sultan Mahmud II (r.1730-1839), the second volume of Ottoman Empire and European Theatre, explores the relationship between Western playwrights, composers and visual artists of the eighteenth-century and Turkish-Ottoman culture, as well as the interest of Ottoman artists in European culture. Twenty-seven contributions by renowned experts shed light on the mutual influences that affected society and art for both Europeans and Ottomans. Successor to the first volume of the series, The Age of Mozart and Sultan Selim III (1756-1808), this book examines the compositions of Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) and his contemporaries along with events in the Ottoman political era during the time span from Sultan Mahmud I (b.1696, r.1730-1754) to Sultan Mahmud II (b.1785, r.1808-1839). Taking Haydn's Türkenopern ('Turkish operas') Lo speziale (1768) and L'incontro improvviso (1775) as the departure point, the articles collected in this publication reflect the growth of research in the area of cultural transfers between the Ottoman Empire and non-Ottoman Europe, as expressed in theatre, music and the visual arts. Contributions by: Emre Aracı, Annemarie Bönsch, Reinhard Buchberger, Bertrand Michael Buchmann, Necla Çıkıgil, Caryl Clark, Matthew Head, Caroline Herfert, Bent Holm, Michael Hüttler, Hans-Peter Kellner, Adam Mestyan, Isabelle Moindrot, Walter Puchner, Günsel Renda, Geoffrey Roper, Orlin Sabev, Çetın Sarıkartal, Käthe Springer-Dissmann, Suna Suner, Frances Trollope, Hans Ernst Weidinger, Daniel Winkler, Larry Wolff, Mehmet Alaaddin Yalçınkaya, Netice Yıldız, Clemens Zoidl.

Carmen Abroad

... Opera and Parody in Paris, 1850–1900 (Brepols, 2020), the co-edited volume (with Michela Niccolai) Musical Theatre in Europe 1830–1945 (Brepols, 2017) and the edited collection Performing Salome, Revealing Stories (Ashgate, 2013).

Carmen Abroad

From the 'old world' to the 'new' and back again, this transnational history of the performance and reception of Bizet's Carmen – whose subject has become a modern myth and its heroine a symbol – provides new understanding of the opera's enduring yet ever-evolving and resituated presence and popularity. This book examines three stages of cultural transfer: the opera's establishment in the repertoire; its performance, translation, adaptation and appropriation in Europe, the Americas and Australia; its cultural 'work' in Soviet Russia, in Japan in the era of Westernisation, in southern, regionalist France and in Carmen's 'homeland', Spain. As the volume reveals the ways in which Bizet's opera swiftly travelled the globe from its Parisian premiere, readers will understand how the story, the music, the staging and the singers appealed to audiences in diverse geographical, artistic and political contexts.

Rethinking Prokofiev

His books Notes from the Pianist's Bench (2000) and Prokofiev's Piano Sonatas: A Guide for the Listener and the Performer (2008) were ... Shapes of Apocalypse (Academic Studies Press), and Performing Salome, Revealing Stories (Ashgate).

Rethinking Prokofiev

Among major 20th-century composers whose music is poorly understood, Sergei Prokofiev stands out conspicuously. The turbulent times in which Prokofiev lived and the chronology of his travels-he left Russia in the wake of Revolution, and returned at the height of the Stalinist purges-have caused unusually polarized appraisals of his music. While individual, distinctive, and instantly recognizable, Prokofiev's music was also idiosyncratically tonal in an age when tonality was largely passé. Prokofiev's output therefore has been largely elusive and difficult to assess against contemporary trends. More than sixty years after the composer's death, editors Rita McAllister and Christina Guillaumier offer Rethinking Prokofiev as an assessment that redresses this enigmatic composer's legacy. Often more political than artistic, these appraisals have depended not only upon the date of publication but also the geographical location of the writer. Commissioned from some of the most distinguished and rising scholars in the field, this collection highlights the background and context of Prokofiev's work. Contributors delve into the composer's relationship to nineteenth-century Russian traditions, Silver-Age and Symbolist composers and poets, the culture of Paris in the 1920s and '30s, and to his later Soviet colleagues and younger contemporaries. They also investigate his reception in the West, his return to Russia, and the effect of his music on contemporary popular culture. Still, the main focus of the book is on the music itself: his early, experimental piano and vocal works, as well as his piano concertos, operas, film scores, early ballets, and late symphonies. Through an empirical examination of his characteristic harmonies, melodies, cadences, and musical gestures-and through an analysis of the newly uncovered contents of his sketch-books-contributors reveal much of what makes Prokofiev an idiosyncratic genius and his music intriguing, often dramatic, and almost always beguiling.

Sacred Sounds Secular Spaces

Performing Salome, Revealing Stories. London: Routledge, 2016. Rowden, Clair. Republican Morality and Catholic Tradition at the Opera: Massenet's Hérodiade and Thaïs. Weinsberg: Musik-Edition Lucie Galland, 2004. Rowell, Diana.

Sacred Sounds  Secular Spaces

Military defeat, political and civil turmoil, and a growing unrest between Catholic traditionalists and increasingly secular Republicans formed the basis of a deep-seated identity crisis in Third Republic France. Beginning in the early 1880s, Republican politicians introduced increasingly secularizing legislation to the parliamentary floor that included, but was not limited to, the secularization of the French educational system. As the divide between Church and State widened on the political stage, more and more composers began writing religious--even liturgical--music for performance in decidedly secular venues, including popular cabaret theaters, prestigious opera houses, and international exhibitions. This trend coincided with Pope Leo XIII's Ralliement politics that encouraged conservative Catholics to "rally" with the Republican government. But the idea of a musical Ralliement has largely gone unquestioned by historians and musicologists alike. Sacred Sounds, Secular Spaces provides the first fundamental reconsideration of music's role in the relationship between the French state and the Catholic Church in the Third Republic. In doing so, the book dismantles the somewhat simplistic epistemological position that emphasizes a sharp division between the Church and the "secular" Republic during this period. Drawing on extensive archival research, critical reception studies, and musical analysis, author Jennifer Walker reveals how composers and critics from often opposing ideological factions undermined the secular/sacred binary through composition and musical performance in an effort to craft a brand of Frenchness that was built on the dual foundations of secular Republicanism and the heritage of the French Catholic Church.

Film Music in the Sound Era

“Outrageous Salome: Grace and Fury in Carmelo Bene's Salomè and Ken Russell's Salome's Last Dance.” In Performing Salome, Revealing Stories, edited by Clair Rowden, 171 ff. Ashgate Interdisciplinary Studies in Opera.

Film Music in the Sound Era

Film Music in the Sound Era: A Research and Information Guide offers a comprehensive bibliography of scholarship on music in sound film (1927–2017). Thematically organized sections cover historical studies, studies of musicians and filmmakers, genre studies, theory and aesthetics, and other key aspects of film music studies. Broad coverage of works from around the globe, paired with robust indexes and thorough cross-referencing, make this research guide an invaluable tool for all scholars and students investigating the intersection of music and film. This guide is published in two volumes: Volume 1: Histories, Theories, and Genres covers overviews, historical surveys, theory and criticism, studies of film genres, and case studies of individual films. Volume 2: People, Cultures, and Contexts covers individual people, social and cultural studies, studies of musical genre, pedagogy, and the industry. A complete index is included in each volume.

Electric Salome

Loie Fuller's Performance of Modernism Rhonda K. Garelick. but never made it to “mais quand même. ... 76 The Textual Subtleties of Salome Fuller introduced one last major alteration in the story of Salome. In nearly all versions, ...

Electric Salome

Loie Fuller was the most famous American in Europe throughout the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Rising from a small-time vaudeville career in the States, she attained international celebrity as a dancer, inventor, impresario, and one of the first women filmmakers in the world. Fuller befriended royalty and inspired artists such as Mallarmé, Toulouse-Lautrec, Rodin, Sarah Bernhardt, and Isadora Duncan. Today, though, she is remembered mainly as an untutored "pioneer" of modern dance and stage technology, the "electricity fairy" who created a sensation onstage whirling under colored spotlights. But in Rhonda Garelick's Electric Salome, Fuller finally receives her due as a major artist whose work helped lay a foundation for all modernist performance to come. The book demonstrates that Fuller was not a mere entertainer or precursor, but an artist of great psychological, emotional, and sexual expressiveness whose work illuminates the centrality of dance to modernism. Electric Salome places Fuller in the context of classical and modern ballet, Art Nouveau, Orientalism, surrealism, the birth of cinema, American modern dance, and European drama. It offers detailed close readings of texts and performances, situated within broader historical, cultural, and theoretical frameworks. Accessibly written, the book also recounts the human story of how an obscure, uneducated woman from the dustbowl of the American Midwest moved to Paris, became a star, and lived openly for decades as a lesbian.

Rilke and Andreas Salom A Love Story in Letters

This documentation is no less revealing for all the pragmatic issues that Rilke was careful to overlook, ... and cynicism that Lou actually had no objection to Rilke being analyzed as long as she was the one doing the analyzing, ...

Rilke and Andreas Salom    A Love Story in Letters

"Immensely readable...a significant piece of scholarship."—Fred Volkmer, New York Sun He would become one of the most important poets of the twentieth century; she a muse of Europe's fin-de-siecle thinkers and artists. In this collection of letters, a finalist for the PEN USA translation award, the poet Rainer Maria Rilke and Lou Andreas-Salomé, a writer and intellectual fourteen years his senior, pen a relationship that spans thirty years and shifting boundaries: as lovers, as mentor and protégé, and as deep personal and literary allies.

Strange True Stories of Louisiana

For weeks together she had bathed and dressed the little Salome every day. ... Mrs. White went out somewhere on the premises, found Salome at work, and remained with her, while Madame Schuber confronted Belmonti, and, revealing Salome's ...

Strange True Stories of Louisiana

Reproduction of the original: Strange True Stories of Louisiana by George W. Cable

Body Knowledge

9 Yet it is not only during her sung performance that Salome's authorial potential is revealed. ... these disparate tales have been conflated in critical summaries, rendering the tales' intertextuality invisible and conveying instead “a ...

Body Knowledge

While female performers in the early 20th century were regularly advertised as dancers, mimics, singers, or actresses, they wove together techniques and elements drawn from a wide variety of genres and media. Onstage and onscreen, performers borrowed from musical scores and narratives, referred to contemporary shows, films, and events, and mimicked fellow performers. Behind the scenes, they experimented with cross-promotion and new advertising techniques and technologies to broadcast images and tales of their performances and lives well beyond the walls of American theaters, cabarets, and halls. The performances and conceptions of art that emerged were innovative, compelling, and deeply meaningful. Body Knowledge examines these performances and the performers behind them, highlighting the Ziegfeld Follies and The Passing Show revues, Salome dancers, Isadora Duncan's Wagner dances, Adeline Genée and Bessie Clayton's danced histories, Hazel Mackaye and Ruth St. Denis's pageants, and Anna Pavlova's opera and film projects. As a whole, it re-imagines early twentieth-century art and entertainment as both fluid and convergent.

Performing Objects and Theatrical Things

polychronic, multitemporal, and reveals a time that is gathered together, and with multiple pleats” (Serres, in Harris, ... How might a close analysis of Allan's Salomé costume open up new perspectives on the past, present, and future?

Performing Objects and Theatrical Things

This book rethinks historical and contemporary theatre, performance, and cultural events by scrutinizing and theorizing the objects and things that activate stages, venues, environments, and archives.

Wilde Salome

In offering the green flower to the Young Syrian , therefore , Salome reveals that she is part of an elaborate imagery and system of ... and his comparatively conventional performance was at odds with the riotous happenings around him .

Wilde  Salome

This 1998 book is a study of Oscar Wilde's Salome, a play now regarded as central to his artistic achievement.

What Blood Won t Tell

Salomé is very unhappy and weeps at her work. When Mrs. Morton expresses sympathy, Salomé reveals that she was born in Germany, that she became separated from her mother, and that her father had Performing Whiteness 61.

What Blood Won t Tell

Is race something we know when we see it? In 1857, Alexina Morrison, a slave in Louisiana, ran away from her master and surrendered herself to the parish jail for protection. Blue-eyed and blond, Morrison successfully convinced white society that she was one of them. When she sued for her freedom, witnesses assured the jury that she was white, and that they would have known if she had a drop of African blood. Morrison’s court trial—and many others over the last 150 years—involved high stakes: freedom, property, and civil rights. And they all turned on the question of racial identity. Over the past two centuries, individuals and groups (among them Mexican Americans, Indians, Asian immigrants, and Melungeons) have fought to establish their whiteness in order to lay claim to full citizenship in local courtrooms, administrative and legislative hearings, and the U.S. Supreme Court. Like Morrison’s case, these trials have often turned less on legal definitions of race as percentages of blood or ancestry than on the way people presented themselves to society and demonstrated their moral and civic character. Unearthing the legal history of racial identity, Ariela Gross’s book examines the paradoxical and often circular relationship of race and the perceived capacity for citizenship in American society. This book reminds us that the imaginary connection between racial identity and fitness for citizenship remains potent today and continues to impede racial justice and equality.

The Making of the New Negro

Until 1994, Wilde's biographers mistakenly claimed that it was a picture of Wilde himself posing as Salome.87 The juxtaposition of Wilde's narrative or alleged visual performance as Salome and Paul's finale reveals a number of ...

The Making of the New Negro

The Making of the New Negro examines black masculinity in the period of the New Negro/Harlem Renaissance, which for many decades did not attract a lot of scholarly attention, until, in the 1990s, many scholars discovered how complex, significant, and fascinating it was. Using African American published texts, American archives and unpublished writings, and contemporaneous European discourses, this book focuses both on the canonical figures of the New Negro Movement and African American culture, such as W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Alain Locke, and Richard Wright, and on writers who have not received as much scholarly attention despite their significance for the movement, such as Wallace Thurman. Its perspective combines gender, sexuality, and race studies with a thorough literary analysis and historicist investigation, an approach that has not been extensively applied to analyze the New Negro Renaissance.