Peter Gabriel From Genesis to Growing Up

These are divided into three important conceptual areas arising from Gabriel's activity as a songwriter and recording artist, performer and activist: 'Identity and Representation', 'Politics and Power' and 'Production and Performance'.

Peter Gabriel  From Genesis to Growing Up

Ever since Peter Gabriel fronted progressive rock band Genesis, from the late 1960s until the mid 1970s, journalists and academics alike have noted the importance of Gabriel's contribution to popular music. His influence became especially significant when he embarked on a solo career in the late 1970s. Gabriel secured his place in the annals of popular music history through his poignant recordings, innovative music videos, groundbreaking live performances, the establishment of WOMAD (the World of Music and Dance) and the Real World record label (as a forum for musicians from around the world to be heard, recorded and promoted) and for his political agenda (including links to a variety of political initiatives including the Artists Against Apartheid Project, Amnesty International and the Human Rights Now tour). In addition, Gabriel is known as a sensitive, articulate and critical performer whose music reflects an innate curiosity and deep intellectual commitment. This collection documents and critically explores the most central themes found in Gabriel's work. These are divided into three important conceptual areas arising from Gabriel's activity as a songwriter and recording artist, performer and activist: 'Identity and Representation', 'Politics and Power' and 'Production and Performance'.

Experiencing Peter Gabriel

Drewett, Michael, Sarah Hill, and Kimi Kärki, eds. 2010. Peter Gabriel, from Genesis to Growing Up. Farnham, UK: Ashgate. Easlea, Daryl. 2014. Without Frontiers: The Life and Music of Peter Gabriel. London: Omnibus. Fast, Larry. 2010.

Experiencing Peter Gabriel

In Experiencing Peter Gabriel, author Durrell Bowman delves into the sounds and stories of the innovative, versatile, English pop icon. As not only a singer-songwriter and musician, but also a music technologist, world-music champion, and humanitarian, Gabriel has consistently maintained an unabashed individualism and dedication to his artistry. From 1969 to 1975, Gabriel served as the lead singer, flute player, occasional percussionist, and frequent songwriter and lyricist of the progressive rock band Genesis. With the band, Gabriel made six studio albums, a live album, and numerous performances and concert tours. The early version of Genesis made some of the most self-consciously complex pop music ever released. However, on the cusp of Genesis becoming a major act internationally, Gabriel did the unthinkable and left the group. Gabriel’s solo career has encompassed nine studio albums, plus five film/media scores, additional songs, videos, major tours, and other projects. As a solo artist and collaborator, he has worked with first-rate musicians and produced unrivaled tracks such as the U.S. No. 1 hit “Sledgehammer.” Gabriel won six Grammy Awards in the 1990s and 2000s, as well as numerous additional awards and honors for his music and his videos, as well as for his humanitarian work. From his early work with Genesis to his substantial contributions as a solo artist, Gabriel’s music ranges from chart-topping pop songs to experimental explorations often filled with disarmingly personal emotions. Experiencing Peter Gabriel investigates the career of this magnetic performer and uncovers how Gabriel developed a sound so full of raw authenticity that it continues to attract new fans from across the world.

Authorship Roles in Popular Music

Hill, Sarah (2010) “From the New Jerusalem to the Secret World: Peter Gabriel and the Shifting Self”, in Drewett, Michael, Sarah Hill & Kimi Kärki (eds.), Peter Gabriel: From Genesis to Growing Up, Farnham: Ashgate, pp 15–30.

Authorship Roles in Popular Music

Authorship Roles in Popular Music applies the critical concept of auteur theory to popular music via different aspects of production and creativity. Through critical analysis of the music itself, this book contextualizes key concepts of authorship relating to gender, race, technology, originality, uniqueness, and genius and raises important questions about the cultural constructions of authenticity, value, class, nationality, and genre. Using a range of case studies as examples, it visits areas as diverse as studio production, composition, DJing, collaboration, performance and audience. This book is an essential introduction to the critical issues and debates surrounding authorship in popular music. It is an ideal resource for students, researchers, and scholars in popular musicology and cultural studies.

Peter Gabriel

... 1999) Buioni, Franck, Peter Gabriel: Real World (Rosières-en-Haye, 2009) Carruthers, Bob, Genesis: The Gabriel Era (China, 2004) Drewett, Michael, Sarah Hill and Kimi Kärki, eds, Peter Gabriel: From Genesis to Growing Up (Farnham, ...

Peter Gabriel

Peter Gabriel is one of contemporary music’s great experimenters. From his work in the progressive group Genesis, through his pioneering solo albums, to his enthusiastic embrace of world music and new technologies, Gabriel has remained steadfast in his commitment to redefining music’s boundaries and influence—geographical, virtual, and thematic. Peter Gabriel offers nuanced and trenchant insight into this enigmatic, questing musician and his works, into an artist whose constant traveling—through identities, influences, and media—defines him as one of modern culture’s truly global citizens. At the heart of Paul Hegarty’s analysis is the idea of locatedness: what it means to be in a specific place at a given time, and to reflect on that time and the changes which inevitably occur. Gabriel’s work, Hegarty argues, can be understood as a series of reflections on the “where” of being—a facet of existence that spans everything from politics to psychology, philosophy, psychogeography, and inward reflection.

Beyond and Before Updated and Expanded Edition

See also Rebecca Guy, 'Nursery Crymes and Sirens' Cries: Peter Gabriel's Use of the Flute', in Peter Gabriel: From Genesis to Growing Up, ed. Michael Drewett, Sarah Hill and Kimi Karki (London: Routledge, 2010), 159–72.

Beyond and Before  Updated and Expanded Edition

The original edition of Beyond and Before extends an understanding of “progressive rock” by providing a fuller definition of what progressive rock is, was and can be. Called by Record Collector “the most accomplished critical overview yet” of progressive rock and one of their 2011 books of the year, Beyond and Before moves away from the limited consensus that prog rock is exclusively English in origin and that it was destroyed by the advent of punk in 1976. Instead, by tracing its multiple origins and complex transitions, it argues for the integration of jazz and folk into progressive rock and the extension of prog in Kate Bush, Radiohead, Porcupine Tree and many more. This 10-year anniversary revised edition continues to further unpack definitions of progressive rock and includes a brand new chapter focusing on post-conceptual trends in the 2010s through to the contemporary moment. The new edition discusses the complex creativity of progressive metal and folk in greater depth, as well as new fusions of genre that move across global cultures and that rework the extended form and mission of progressive rock, including in recent pop concept albums. All chapters are revised to keep the process of rethinking progressive rock alive and vibrant as a hybrid, open form.

U2 and the Religious Impulse

Turning the Axis: The Stage Performance Design Collaboration Between Peter Gabriel and Robert Lepage. In Michael Drewett, Sarah Hill, and Kimi Kärki, eds., Peter Gabriel, From Genesis to Growing Up, 225–240. Aldershot: Ashgate Press.

U2 and the Religious Impulse

U2 and the Religious Impulse examines indications in U2's music and performances that the band work at conscious and subconscious levels as artists who focus on matters of the spirit, religious traditions, and a life guided by both belief and doubt. U2 is known for a career of stirring songs, landmark performances and for its interest in connecting with fans to reach a higher power to accomplish greater purposes. Its success as a rock band is unparalleled in the history of rock 'n' roll's greatest acts. In addition to all the thrills one would expect from entertainers at this level, U2 surprises many listeners who examine its lyrics and concert themes by having a depth of interest in matters of human existence more typically found in literature, philosophy and theology. The multi-disciplinary perspectives presented here account for the durability of U2's art and offer informed explanations as to why many fans of popular music who seek a connection with a higher power find U2 to be a kindred spirit. This study will be of interest to scholars and students of religious studies and musicology, interested in religion and popular music, as well as religion and popular culture more broadly.

An Eye for Music

... “Plasticine Music: Surrealism in Peter Gabriel's 'Sledgehammer,'” in Michael Drewett, Sarah Hill and Kimi Kärki, eds., Games Without Frontiers: Peter Gabriel From Genesis to Growing Up (Farnham and Burlington: Ashgate, 2010), ...

An Eye for Music

In An Eye for Music, John Richardson navigates key areas of current thought - from music theory to film theory to cultural theory - to explore what it means that the experience of music is now cinematic, spatial, and visual as much as it is auditory.

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Rock Music Research

Karageorghis, Costas I., Peter C. Terry, and Andrew M. Lane. ... Karahasanolu, Songül and Gabriel Skoog. ... In Peter Gabriel, From Genesis to Growing up, edited by Michael Drewett, Sarah Hill, and Kimi Kärki, 225–240.

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Rock Music Research

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Rock Music Research is the first comprehensive academic survey of the field of rock music as it stands today. More than 50 years into its life and we still ask - what is rock music, why is it studied, and how does it work, both as music and as cultural activity? This volume draws together 37 of the leading academics working on rock to provide answers to these questions and many more. The text is divided into four major sections: practice of rock (analysis, performance, and recording); theories; business of rock; and social and culture issues. Each chapter combines two approaches, providing a summary of current knowledge of the area concerned as well as the consequences of that research and suggesting profitable subsequent directions to take. This text investigates and presents the field at a level of depth worthy of something which has had such a pervasive influence on the lives of millions.

Researching Live Music

“Turning the Axis: The Stage Performance Design Collaboration Between Peter Gabriel and Robert Lepage.” In Peter Gabriel: From Genesis to Growing Up, edited by Michael Drewett, Sarah Hill, and Kimi Kärki, 225–40. Aldershot: Ashgate.

Researching Live Music

Researching Live Music offers an important contribution to the emergent field of live music studies. Featuring paradigmatic case studies, this book is split into four parts, first addressing perspectives associated with production, then promotion and consumption, and finally policy. The contributors to the book draw on a range of methodological and theoretical positions to provide a critical resource that casts new light on live music processes and shows how live music events have become central to raising and discussing broader social and cultural issues. Their case studies expand our knowledge of how live music events work and extend beyond the familiar contexts of the United States and United Kingdom to include examples drawn from Argentina, Australia, France, Jamaica, Japan, New Zealand, Switzerland, and Poland. Researching Live Music is the first comprehensive review of the different ways in which live music can be studied as an interdisciplinary field, including innovative approaches to the study of historic and contemporary live music events. It represents a crucial reading for professionals, students, and researchers working in all aspects of live music.

Music Narrative and the Moving Image

Köhler, Peter (1989). Nonsens: Theorie und Geschichte der ... “Plasticine Music: Surrealism in Peter Gabriel's 'Sledgehammer'”. ... Frontiers: Peter Gabriel from Genesis to Growing Up. Farnham/Burlington, VT: Ashgate. 195–210.

Music  Narrative and the Moving Image

By focusing on discussions of artistic works that show relationships between three individual communicative media, this volume adopts an innovative, trifocal interdisciplinary perspective: the traditional field of Word and Music Studies is here extended to include research on film and other forms of moving visualizations.

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Popular Music Video Analysis

... edited by John Richardson and Stan Hawkins (Helsinki: Helsinki University Press, 2007), 401–441; John Richardson, “Plasticine Music: Surrealism in Peter Gabriel's, 'Sledgehammer,'” in Peter Gabriel, From Genesis to Growing Up, ...

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Popular Music Video Analysis

Music videos promote popular artists in cultural forms that circulate widely across social media networks. With the advent of YouTube in 2005 and the proliferation of handheld technologies and social networking sites, the music video has become available to millions worldwide, and continues to serve as a fertile platform for the debate of issues and themes in popular culture. This volume of essays serves as a foundational handbook for the study and interpretation of the popular music video, with the specific aim of examining the industry contexts, cultural concepts, and aesthetic materials that videos rely upon in order to be both intelligible and meaningful. Easily accessible to viewers in everyday life, music videos offer profound cultural interventions and negotiations while traversing a range of media forms. From a variety of unique perspectives, the contributors to this volume undertake discussions that open up new avenues for exploring the creative changes and developments in music video production. With chapters that address music video authorship, distribution, cultural representations, mediations, aesthetics, and discourses, this study signals a major initiative to provide a deeper understanding of the intersecting and interdisciplinary approaches that are invoked in the analysis of this popular and influential musical form.

The Oxford Handbook of Applied Ethnomusicology

In Peter Gabriel, From Genesis to Growing Up, edited by Michael Drewett, Sarah Hill and Kimi Kärki. London: Ashgate. Lipsitz, G. (1994). Dangerous Crossroads: Popular Music, Postmodernism and the Poetics of Place. London: Verso.

The Oxford Handbook of Applied Ethnomusicology

Applied studies scholarship has triggered a not-so-quiet revolution in the discipline of ethnomusicology. The current generation of applied ethnomusicologists has moved toward participatory action research, involving themselves in musical communities and working directly on their behalf. The essays in The Oxford Handbook of Applied Ethnomusicology, edited by Svanibor Pettan and Jeff Todd Titon, theorize applied ethnomusicology, offer histories, and detail practical examples with the goal of stimulating further development in the field. The essays in the book, all newly commissioned for the volume, reflect scholarship and data gleaned from eleven countries by over twenty contributors. Themes and locations of the research discussed encompass all world continents. The authors present case studies encompassing multiple places; other that discuss circumstances within a geopolitical unit, either near or far. Many of the authors consider marginalized peoples and communities; others argue for participatory action research. All are united in their interest in overarching themes such as conflict, education, archives, and the status of indigenous peoples and immigrants. A volume that at once defines its field, advances it, and even acts as a large-scale applied ethnomusicology project in the way it connects ideas and methodology, The Oxford Handbook of Applied Ethnomusicology is a seminal contribution to the study of ethnomusicology, theoretical and applied.

Beggars Banquet and the Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Revolution

“Turning the Axis: The Stage Performance Design Collaboration Between Peter Gabriel and Robert Lepage.” In: M. Drewett, S. Hill, & K. Kärki (eds.), Peter Gabriel, from Genesis to Growing up. Aldershot: Ashgate Press, pp. 225–240.

Beggars Banquet and the Rolling Stones  Rock and Roll Revolution

The Rolling Stones’ Beggars Banquet is one of the seminal albums in rock history. Arguably it not only marks the advent of the ‘mature’ sound of the Rolling Stones but lays out a new blueprint for an approach to blues-based rock music that would endure for several decades. From its title to the dark themes that pervade some of its songs, Beggars Banquet reflected and helped define a moment marked by violence, decay, and upheaval. It marked a move away from the artistic sonic flourishes of psychedelic rock towards an embrace of foundational streams of American music – blues, country – that had always underpinned the music of the Stones but assumed new primacy in their music after 1968. This move coincided with, and anticipated, the ‘roots’ moves that many leading popular music artists made as the 1960s turned toward a new decade; but unlike many of their peers whose music grew more ‘soft’ and subdued as they embraced traditional styles, the music and attitude of the Stones only grew harder and more menacing, and their status as representatives of the dark underside of the 60s rock counterculture assumed new solidity. For the Rolling Stones, the 1960s ended and the 1970s began with the release of this album in 1968.

Digital Sampling

'I'd Like my Record to Sound Like This': Peter Gabriel and Audio Technology. in M. Drewett, S. Hill, and K. Karki. eds. Peter Gabriel: From Genesis to Growing Up. Farnham: Ashgate. Fairlight. 1980. Turn This Page and the Future of Music ...

Digital Sampling

Digital Sampling is the first book about the design and use of sampling technologies that have shaped the sounds of popular music since the 1980s. Written in two parts, Digital Sampling begins with an exploration of the Fairlight CMI and how artists like Kate Bush and Peter Gabriel used it to sample the sounds of everyday life. It also focuses on E-mu Systems and the use of its keyboards and drum machines in hip-hop. The second part follows users across a range of musical worlds, including US/UK garage, indie folk music, and electronic music made from the sounds of sewers, war zones, and crematoriums. Using material from interviews and concepts from the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS), Digital Sampling provides a new and alternative approach to the study of sampling and is crucial reading for undergraduates, postgraduates, and researchers from a wide range of disciplines, including music technology, media, communication, and cultural studies.

Sound as Popular Culture

“I'd like my record to sound like this:” Peter Gabriel and audio technology. In Peter Gabriel: From Genesis to Growing Up, ed. Michael Drewett, Sarah Hill, and Kimi Kärki, 173–182. Aldershot: Ashgate. Fabbri, Franco. 2012a.

Sound as Popular Culture

Scholars consider sound and its concepts, taking as their premise the idea that popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way through sound. The wide-ranging texts in this book take as their premise the idea that sound is a subject through which popular culture can be analyzed in an innovative way. From an infant's gurgles over a baby monitor to the roar of the crowd in a stadium to the sub-bass frequencies produced by sound systems in the disco era, sound—not necessarily aestheticized as music—is inextricably part of the many domains of popular culture. Expanding the view taken by many scholars of cultural studies, the contributors consider cultural practices concerning sound not merely as semiotic or signifying processes but as material, physical, perceptual, and sensory processes that integrate a multitude of cultural traditions and forms of knowledge. The chapters discuss conceptual issues as well as terminologies and research methods; analyze historical and contemporary case studies of listening in various sound cultures; and consider the ways contemporary practices of sound generation are applied in the diverse fields in which sounds are produced, mastered, distorted, processed, or enhanced. The chapters are not only about sound; they offer a study through sound—echoes from the past, resonances of the present, and the contradictions and discontinuities that suggest the future. Contributors Karin Bijsterveld, Susanne Binas-Preisendörfer, Carolyn Birdsall, Jochen Bonz, Michael Bull, Thomas Burkhalter, Mark J. Butler, Diedrich Diederichsen, Veit Erlmann, Franco Fabbri, Golo Föllmer, Marta García Quiñones, Mark Grimshaw, Rolf Großmann, Maria Hanáček, Thomas Hecken, Anahid Kassabian, Carla J. Maier, Andrea Mihm, Bodo Mrozek, Carlo Nardi, Jens Gerrit Papenburg, Thomas Schopp, Holger Schulze, Toby Seay, Jacob Smith, Paul Théberge, Peter Wicke, Simon Zagorski-Thomas

Frontiers of Screen History

... Peter Gabriel and the Question of Being Eccentric' in Peter Gabriel, From Genesis to Growing Up (2011). He has written extensively about the history of British and Finnish popular culture. His contemporary work deals with the ...

Frontiers of Screen History

Frontiers of Screen History provides an insightful exploration into the depiction and imagination of European borders in cinema after World War II. The editors and authors bring forward the geopolitical issues at the basis both the films of world-wide distribution, known to many, and others, shot within confining conditions or inhighly local places, remain unknown within prevailing canons.

Public Ethnomusicology Education Archives Commerce

Berkeley: University of California Press. Laing, David. (2010). “'Hand-made, Hi-tech, Worldwide': Peter Gabriel and World Music.” In Peter Gabriel, From Genesis to Growing Up, edited by Michael Drewett, Sarah Hill and Kimi Kärki.

Public Ethnomusicology  Education  Archives    Commerce

The seven ethnomusicologists who contributed to this volume discuss the role and impact of applied ethnomusicology in a variety of public and private sectors, including the commercial music industry, archives and collections, public folklore programs, and music education programs at public schools. Public Ethnomusicology, Education, Archives, and Commerce is the third of three paperback volumes derived from the original Oxford Handbook of Applied Ethnomusicology. The Handbook can be understood as an applied ethnomusicology project: as a medium of getting to know the thoughts and experiences of global ethnomusicologists, of enriching general knowledge and understanding about ethnomusicologies and applied ethnomusicologies in various parts of the world, and of inspiring readers to put the accumulated knowledge, understanding, and skills into good use for the betterment of our world.

Englishness Pop and Post War Britain

______ (2010b), 'Peter Gabriel and the Question of Being Eccentric', in M. Drewett, S. Hill and K. Kärki (eds), Peter Gabriel From Genesis to Growing Up, Farnham: Ashgate Publishing, pp. 31–42. ______ (2013), 'Looking for Alternative ...

Englishness  Pop and Post War Britain

English pop music was a dominant force on the global cultural scene in the decades after World War II—and it served a key role in defining, constructing, and challenging various ideas about Englishness in the period. Kari Kallioniemi covers a stunning range of styles of pop—from punk, reggae, and psychedelia to jazz, rock, Brit Pop, and beyond—as he explores the question of how various artists (including such major figures as David Bowie and Morrissey), genres, and pieces of music contributed to the developing understanding of who and what was English in the transformative post-war years.

Made in Finland

“Turning the Axis: The Stage Performance Design Collaboration Between Peter Gabriel and Robert Lepage.” In Peter Gabriel, From Genesis To Growing Up, edited by Michael Drewett, Sarah Hill and Kimi Kärki, 225–240.

Made in Finland

Made in Finland: Studies in Popular Music serves as a comprehensive and thorough introduction to the history, culture, and musicology of twentieth and twenty-first century popular music in Finland. The volume consists of essays by leading scholars in the field, and covers the major figures, styles, and social contexts of popular music in Finland. Each essay provides adequate context so readers understand why the figure or genre under discussion is of lasting significance. The book is organized into five thematic sections: Emerging Foundations of Popular Music in Finland; Environments, Borderlines, Minorities; Transnationalisms; Sounds from the Underground; and Redefining Finnishness.

Experiencing Progressive Rock

For a discussion on Gabriel's role in Genesis and his subsequent career, see Peter Gabriel: From Genesis to Growing Up, ed. Michael Drewett, Sarah Hill, and Kim Kärki (Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2010). 27. Paul Hegarty and Martin Halliwell, ...

Experiencing Progressive Rock

In Experiencing Progressive Rock: A Listener's Companion, Robert G. H. Burns brings together the many strands that define the "prog rock" movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s to chart the evolution of this remarkable rock tradition over the decades. Originating in the 1960s with acts like Yes, Pink Floyd, King Crimson, The Who, Jethro Tull, Genesis, and The Moody Blues, progressive rock emerged as a response to the counterculture on both sides of the Atlantic. Prog rock drew heavily on European classical music as well as the sophisticated improvisations of American jazz to create unique fusions that defied record label and radio station categorizations. Reemerging after the 1980s, a new generation of musicians took the original influences of progressive rock and reinvented new formats within the existing style. The trend of combining influences continues to the present day, earning new audiences among the musically curious. Burns draws on his own experiences and original interviews with members of prog rock acts such as Colosseum, Renaissance, Steve Hackett’s Genesis Revisited, past and current members of King Crimson, Steven Wilson, and Brand X, as well as several others, to provide an exciting behind-the-scenes look at this unique and ever-changing musical expression'.