Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity

This collection of essays includes unpublished work by Jaspers himself as well as testimonies to his life and career by colleagues, associates, and translators, some of who knew Jaspers personally.

Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity

Karl Jaspers, who died in 1969, had a profound impact on 20th-century theology and philosophy. His central thesis called for, among other things, a de-centering of philosophy from its Eurocentric roots and a renewal of its dialogue with other traditions, especially Asian ones. This collection of essays includes unpublished work by Jaspers himself as well as testimonies to his life and career by colleagues, associates, and translators, some of who knew Jaspers personally. Readers will also find commentary and interpretation by researchers who have explored Jaspers’ work for decades, and a biographical account of Jaspers’ student Leonard Ehrlich, who handled much of Jaspers’ English translation. The book interrogates Jaspers’ conceptions of ‘philosophical faith’, his philosophy of communication, and the prospects for world philosophy in the future. Focusing on philosophical faith, it assesses Jaspers’ interpretations of key philosophers such as Kant, Hegel, Schelling, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Rosenzweig, as well as examining his personal relationships with Bultmann and Heidegger. Contributors also look at Jaspers’ philosophies of religion and history, his hypothesis of the ‘axial age’ (Achsenzeit), and his contributions to metaphysics, periechontology, and economics. Finally, chapters cover Jaspers’ philosophy of communication and world history. The latter are informed by a burgeoning interest in Kantian ‘Freiheitphilosophie’ that influenced Jaspers, as well as concerns over the future of humanity. These concerns in part account for Jaspers’ growing popularity in the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Central/South America, and Asia. Also included are lucid clarifications of the difference between religious and philosophical faith, and the relevance of certainty, trust, and communication for a future of mankind. Trained as a psychiatrist, Jaspers practiced this profession before becoming a philosopher and thus had a keen insight into the workings of the human mind even as he challenged the philosophical establishment of his time. It is perhaps this depth to his background that adds to the contemporary relevance of his work.

Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity

This collection of essays includes unpublished work by Jaspers himself as well as testimonies to his life and career by colleagues, associates, and translators, some of who knew Jaspers personally.

Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity


Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity

The totalitarian dictatorships of the recent past indicate the future of humanity can be affected by “the most radical freedom ... Jaspers bases his belief that “Faith in revelation and philosophical faith can become one” (PGO 479).

Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity

Karl Jaspers, who died in 1969, had a profound impact on 20th-century theology and philosophy. His central thesis called for, among other things, a de-centering of philosophy from its Eurocentric roots and a renewal of its dialogue with other traditions, especially Asian ones. This collection of essays includes unpublished work by Jaspers himself as well as testimonies to his life and career by colleagues, associates, and translators, some of who knew Jaspers personally. Readers will also find commentary and interpretation by researchers who have explored Jaspers’ work for decades, and a biographical account of Jaspers’ student Leonard Ehrlich, who handled much of Jaspers’ English translation. The book interrogates Jaspers’ conceptions of ‘philosophical faith’, his philosophy of communication, and the prospects for world philosophy in the future. Focusing on philosophical faith, it assesses Jaspers’ interpretations of key philosophers such as Kant, Hegel, Schelling, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Rosenzweig, as well as examining his personal relationships with Bultmann and Heidegger. Contributors also look at Jaspers’ philosophies of religion and history, his hypothesis of the ‘axial age’ (Achsenzeit), and his contributions to metaphysics, periechontology, and economics. Finally, chapters cover Jaspers’ philosophy of communication and world history. The latter are informed by a burgeoning interest in Kantian ‘Freiheitphilosophie’ that influenced Jaspers, as well as concerns over the future of humanity. These concerns in part account for Jaspers’ growing popularity in the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Central/South America, and Asia. Also included are lucid clarifications of the difference between religious and philosophical faith, and the relevance of certainty, trust, and communication for a future of mankind. Trained as a psychiatrist, Jaspers practiced this profession before becoming a philosopher and thus had a keen insight into the workings of the human mind even as he challenged the philosophical establishment of his time. It is perhaps this depth to his background that adds to the contemporary relevance of his work.

Van Gogh among the Philosophers

His research interests center on philosophy of art and tragic visions of human existence. ... He was an editor for Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity (2012), Karl Jaspers Historic Actuality in View of Fundamental Problems of ...

Van Gogh among the Philosophers

This volume brings Continental philosophical interpretations of Van Gogh into dialogue with one another to explore how for Van Gogh, art places human beings in their world, and yet in other ways displaces them, not allowing them to belong to that world.

The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy

Victor Sōgen Hori is retired professor in the School of Religious Studies at McGill University. ... as the Will to Communicate: Two Case Studies in Intercultural Understanding” in Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity (2012).

The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy

Japanese philosophy is now a flourishing field with thriving societies, journals, and conferences dedicated to it around the world, made possible by an ever-increasing library of translations, books, and articles. The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy is a foundation-laying reference work that covers, in detail and depth, the entire span of this philosophical tradition, from ancient times to the present. It introduces and examines the most important topics, figures, schools, and texts from the history of philosophical thinking in premodern and modern Japan. Each chapter, written by a leading scholar in the field, clearly elucidates and critically engages with its topic in a manner that demonstrates its contemporary philosophical relevance. The Handbook opens with an extensive introductory chapter that addresses the multifaceted question, "What is Japanese Philosophy?" The first fourteen chapters cover the premodern history of Japanese philosophy, with sections dedicated to Shinto and the Synthetic Nature of Japanese Philosophical Thought, Philosophies of Japanese Buddhism, and Philosophies of Japanese Confucianism and Bushido. Next, seventeen chapters are devoted to Modern Japanese Philosophies. After a chapter on the initial encounter with and appropriation of Western philosophy in the late nineteenth-century, this large section is divided into one subsection on the most well-known group of twentieth-century Japanese philosophers, The Kyoto School, and a second subsection on the no less significant array of Other Modern Japanese Philosophies. Rounding out the volume is a section on Pervasive Topics in Japanese Philosophical Thought, which covers areas such as philosophy of language, philosophy of nature, ethics, and aesthetics, spanning a range of schools and time periods. This volume will be an invaluable resource specifically to students and scholars of Japanese philosophy, as well as more generally to those interested in Asian and comparative philosophy and East Asian studies.

Christianity and Confucianism

repudiates 'phenomenological existentialism' that is rooted in situation, 91 in favour of 'philosophic faith' and a path through ... A. M. Olson and G. J. Walters (eds), Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity , 408–18 (esp.

Christianity and Confucianism

Christianity and Confucianism: Culture, Faith and Politics, sets comparative textual analysis against the backcloth of 2000 years of cultural, political, and religious interaction between China and the West. As the world responds to China's rise and China positions herself for global engagement, this major new study reawakens and revises an ancient conversation. As a generous introduction to biblical Christianity and the Confucian Classics, Christianity and Confucianism tells a remarkable story of mutual formation and cultural indebtedness. East and West are shown to have shaped the mind, heart, culture, philosophy and politics of the other - and far more, perhaps, than either knows or would want to admit. Christopher Hancock has provided a rich and stimulating resource for scholars and students, diplomats and social scientists, devotees of culture and those who pursue wisdom and peace today.

The Routledge Handbook of Religious Naturalism

The Philosophy of Karl Jaspers (LaSalle, IL: Open Court Press, 1981) is part of the Library of Living Philosophers series. ... H. Wautischer, A.M. Olson, and G. Walters (eds) Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity (Media, ...

The Routledge Handbook of Religious Naturalism

Ecological crisis is being widely discussed in society today and therefore, the subject of religious naturalism has emerged as a major topic in religion. The Routledge Handbook of Religious Naturalism is an outstanding reference source to the key topics, problems, and debates in this exciting subject and is the first collection of its kind. Comprising thirty-four chapters by a team of international contributors, the Handbook is divided into seven parts: • Varieties of religious naturalism and its relations to other outlooks • Some earlier religious naturalists • Pantheism, materialism, and the value-ladenness of nature • Ecology, humans, and politics in naturalistic perspective • Religious naturalism and traditional religions • Putting religious naturalism into practice • Critical discussions of religious naturalism. Within these sections central issues, debates, and problems are examined, including: defining religious naturalism; religious underpinnings of ecology; natural piety; the religious-aesthetic; ecstatic naturalism as deep pantheism; spiritual ecology; African-American religious naturalism; Christian religious naturalism; Dao and water; Confucianism; environmental action; and practices in religious naturalism. The Routledge Handbook of Religious Naturalism is essential reading for students and researchers in religious studies, theology, and philosophy. The Handbook will also be useful for those in related fields, such as environmental ethics and ecology.

Environmental Guilt and Shame

Philosophy, and Sociology, ed. ... Hope and Grief in the Anthropocene: Re-Conceptualising Human-Nature Relations, Routledge Research in the Anthropocene. ... In Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity, 347–63. New York: Springer.

Environmental Guilt and Shame

This study shows that many people in the US feel guilt about their everyday life. It explores many ethical questions including whether individuals or collectives are the guilty or shameful parties, whether agents should have these feelings, whether people should induce guilt or shame in others, and how people can respond to such feelings.

Canadian Daoist Poetics Ethics and Aesthetics

Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity. London: Springer, 2012. Wei, Li and Chen, ... Seeking for the Clues of Knowledge for the Origin of Chinese Philosophy: From Ancient Times to Laozi. The Development and Formation of ...

Canadian Daoist Poetics  Ethics  and Aesthetics

This monograph takes an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural approach to 20th and 21st -century Canadian Daoist poetry, fiction and criticism in comparative, innovative and engaging ways. Of particular interest are the authors’ refreshing insights into such holistic and topical issues as the globalization of concepts of the Dao, the Yin/Yang, the Heaven-Earth-Humanity triad, the Four Greats, Five Phases, Non-action and so on, as expressed in Canadian literature and criticism – which produces Canadian-constructed Daoist poetics, ethics and aesthetics. Readers will come to understand and appreciate the social and ecological significance of, formal innovations, moral sensitivity, aesthetic principles and ideological complexity in Canadian-Daoist works.

Listening for Democracy

... 'The factor of listening in Karl Jaspers' philosophy of communication', in Helmut wautischer, alan m. olsen ... J. walters (eds), Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity (Heidelberg, London, and new york: springer, 2012).

Listening for Democracy

Although much prized in daily conversation, good listening has been almost completely ignored in that form of political conversation we know as democracy. This book examines the reasons why so little attention has been paid to the listening aspect of democratic conversation, explores the role that listening might play in democracy, and outlines some institutional changes that could be made to make listening more central to democratic processes. The focus on listening amounts to a reorientation of democratic theory and practice, providing novel perspectives on enduring themes in democracy such as recognition, representation, power and legitimacy—as well as some new ones, such as silence. Eschewing the pessimism of the 'realist' turn in democratic theory, the book shows how attention to listening can breathe life into the democratic project and help us to realise some of its objectives. Drawing on practical examples and multidisciplinary sources, the book shows how listening should be at the heart or representative and deliberative democracy rather than peripheral to them. It develops a notion of dialogic democracy based on structured, 'apophatic', listening, and meets the challenge of showing how this could be incorporated in parliamentary democracies. What should we be listening out for? This book addresses the question of political noise and uses the idea of recognition to develop an account of politics that takes us beyond the Aristotelian speaking being towards a Deweyan notion of the 'event' around which publics coalesce.

Exposed

... eds., Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity (New York: Springer, 2012), 299–319. 13. Chris Butler, Henri Lefebvre: Spatial Politics, Everyday Life and the Right to the City (New York: Routledge, 2012), 14, 21. 14.

Exposed

Exploiting our boundless desire to access everything all the time, digital technology is breaking down whatever boundaries still exist between the state, the market, and the private realm. Bernard Harcourt offers a powerful critique of what he calls the expository society, revealing just how unfree we are becoming and how little we seem to care.

Jerusalem

Philosophical Faith and the Future of Humanity. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer Verlag, 2012, 189– 202. Zank, Michael. “Jerusalem in Religious Studies: The City and Scripture.” In Elman, Miriam and Madeleine Adelman (eds.) ...

Jerusalem

Provides a short, accessible, and lively introduction to Jerusalem Jerusalem - A Brief History shows how Jewish, Christian, and Islamic scriptures confer providential meaning to the fate of the city and how modern Jerusalem is haunted by waves of biblical fantasy aiming at mutually exclusive status-quo rectification. It presents the major epochs of the history of Jerusalem’s urban transformation, inviting readers to imagine Jerusalem as a city that is not just sacred to the many groups of people who hold it dear, but as a united, unharmed place that is, in this sense, holy. Jerusalem - A Brief History starts in modern Jerusalem—giving readers a look at the city as it exists today. It goes on to tell of its emergence as a holy city in three different ways, focusing each time on another aspect of the biblical past. Next, it discusses the transformation of Jerusalem from a formerly Jewish temple city, condemned to oblivion by its Roman destroyers, into an imperially sponsored Christian theme park, and the afterlife of that same city under later Byzantine and Muslim rulers. Lastly, the book returns to present day Jerusalem to examine the development of the modern city under the Ottomans and the British, the history of division and reunification, and the ongoing jostling over access to, and sovereignty over, Jerusalem’s contested holy places. Offers a unique integration of approaches, including urban history, the rhetoric of power, the history of art and architecture, biblical hermeneutics, and modern Middle Eastern Studies Places great emphasis on how Jerusalem is a real city where different people live and coexist Examines the urban transformation that has taken place since late Ottoman times Utilizes numerous line drawings to demonstrate how its monumental buildings, created to illustrate an alliance of divine and human power, are in fact quite ephemeral, transient, and fragile Jerusalem - A Brief History is a comprehensive and thoughtful introduction to the Holy City that will appeal to any student of religion and/or history.

Making Sense

'I don't have many can't miss podcasts, but Making Sense is right at the top of that short list.' - Stephen Fry 'Sam Harris is the most intellectually courageous man I know.' - Richard Dawkins

Making Sense

"Civilization rests on a series of successful conversations." Sam Harris Neuroscientist, philosopher, podcaster and bestselling author Sam Harris, has been exploring some of the greatest questions concerning the human mind, society, and the events that shape our world. Harris's search for deeper understanding of how we think has led him to engage and exchange with some of our most brilliant and controversial contemporary minds - Daniel Kahneman, Robert Sapolsky, Anil Seth and Max Tegmark - in order to unpack and clarify ideas of consciousness, free will, extremism, and ethical living. For Harris, honest conversation, no matter how difficult or contentious, represents the only path to moral and intellectual progress. Featuring eleven conversations from the hit podcast, these electric exchanges fuse wisdom with rigorous interrogation to shine a light on what it means to make sense of our world today. 'I don't have many can't miss podcasts, but Making Sense is right at the top of that short list.' - Stephen Fry 'Sam Harris is the most intellectually courageous man I know.' - Richard Dawkins

Reconfigurations of Philosophy of Religion

Explores the place and meaning of philosophy of religion in our current poststructuralist, postsecular, postcolonialist context. This collection addresses, as it exemplifies, an identity crisis in contemporary philosophy of religion.

Reconfigurations of Philosophy of Religion

Explores the place and meaning of philosophy of religion in our current poststructuralist, postsecular, postcolonialist context. This collection addresses, as it exemplifies, an identity crisis in contemporary philosophy of religion. It represents a unique two-way dialogue between philosophers of religion and scholars of religion and broaches issues pertaining to the philosophy of religion and the philosophical tradition, on the one hand, and religious studies, theology, and the modern academy on the other. While each author manages the current challenges in philosophy of religion differently, one can nonetheless discern a polyphony of interests surrounding a postcritical, postsecular appreciation of religion. In part 1, contributors ask how philosophy of religion can accommodate both the strengths and weaknesses of Western analytic and continental traditions; incorporate developments in ideology critique, gender studies, and Asian philosophies; and negotiate the perceived stalemate in philosophy of religion. Part 2 addresses these questions in terms of a philosophy of religion that is postcolonial in intention and multidisciplinary in orientation and features scholarship from the fields of both religion and theology. An underlying theme is the importance of ushering philosophy of religion into a postphenomenological era of religious studies and theology. This is a neglected dimension in many laudable discussions about philosophy of religion that this volume hopes to emend. “This gathering of important voices and the differences of approach and opinion that they represent invites/provokes reflection, self-examination by philosophers of religion, and further work.” — Jeffrey Dudiak, author of The Intrigue of Ethics: A Reading of the Idea of Discourse in the Thought of Emmanuel Levinas

The Political Philosophy of Zionism

Cohen even asserts that Judaism and Kant share the same orientation toward time: The former is a religion centered on hope and faith in the future, on “turning away from the actually given,” and on “the liberation of man's mind from the ...

The Political Philosophy of Zionism

Zionism emerged at the end of the nineteenth century in response to a rise in anti-Semitism in Europe and to the crisis of modern Jewish identity. This novel, national revolution aimed to unite a scattered community defined mainly by shared texts and literary tradition, into a vibrant political entity destined for the Holy Land. As this remarkable book demonstrates, however, Zionism was about much more than a national political ideology and practice. By tracing its origins in the context of a European history of ideas, and by considering the writings of key Jewish and Hebrew writers and thinkers from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the book offers an entirely new philosophical perspective on Zionism as a unique movement based on intellectual boldness and belief in human action. In counter-distinction to the studies of history and ideology that dominate the field, this book also offers a new way of reflecting upon contemporary Israeli politics.

Continental Philosophy and Philosophy of Religion

... 192, 203, 205–217 “Faith and Knowledge”, 213 The Future of Human Nature, 213 “The German Idealism of the Jewish Philosophers”, 206 immanent critique of religion, 215 Knowledge and Human Interests, 122 non-causal theory of action, ...

Continental Philosophy and Philosophy of Religion

This is the first book that provides access to twelve Continental philosophers and the consequences of their thinking for the philosophy of religion. Basically, in the second half of the twentieth century, it has been treated from within the Anglo- American school of philosophy, which deals mainly with proofs and truths, and questions of faith. This approach is more concerned with human experience, and pays more attention to historical context and cultural influences. As such, it provides challenging questions about the way forward for philosophy of religion in the twenty-first century.

The Postsecular Political Philosophy of J rgen Habermas

Religion and Rationality: Essays on Reason, God and Modernity (Cambridge: Polity, 2002) —— 'Are There Postmetaphysical Answers to the Question: What is the “Good Life”?', in The Future of Human Nature (Cambridge: Polity, 2003) —— 'Faith ...

The Postsecular Political Philosophy of J  rgen Habermas

Jürgen Habermas is arguably the world’s most influential living philosopher – by introducing ideas such as the public sphere, constitutional patriotism, and the discourse theory of law and democracy, he has transformed modern political philosophy. But since 2001, Habermas’s thought has taken an unexpected turn. This book is the first full-length treatment of Habermas’s postsecular political philosophy, and critically analyses his new direction of thought. The author places the postsecular turn in the context of Habermas’s long-standing commitment to developing a postmetaphysical account of morality, politics and human communication; the tension between secular liberal democracy and religious freedom is real, but there may be losses as well as gains to Habermas’s quest to translate the sacred.

The Future of Man

Written over a period of thirty years and presented here in chronological order, the essays cover the wide-ranging interests and inquiries that engaged Teilhard de Chardin throughout his life: intellectual and social evolution; the coming ...

The Future of Man

The Future of Manis a magnificent introduction to the thoughts and writings of Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, one of the few figures in the history of the Catholic Church to achieve renown as both a scientist and a theologian. Trained as a paleontologist and ordained as a Jesuit priest, Teilhard de Chardin devoted himself to establishing the intimate, interdependent connection between science—particularly the theory of evolution—and the basic tenets of the Christian faith. At the center of his philosophy was the belief that the human species is evolving spiritually, progressing from a simple faith to higher and higher forms of consciousness, including a consciousness of God, and culminating in the ultimate understanding of humankind’s place and purpose in the universe. The Church, which would not condone his philosophical writings, refused to allow their publication during his lifetime. Written over a period of thirty years and presented here in chronological order, the essays cover the wide-ranging interests and inquiries that engaged Teilhard de Chardin throughout his life: intellectual and social evolution; the coming of ultra-humanity; the integral place of faith in God in the advancement of science; and the impact of scientific discoveries on traditional religious dogma. Less formal thanThe Phenomenon of ManandThe Divine Milieu, Teilhard de Chardin’s most renowned works, The Future of Man offers a complete, fully accessible look at the genesis of ideas that continue to reverberate in both the scientific and the religious communities.

Omnidoxy

Cometan became an exponent of religious commercialisation as well as a space activist, but the first of whom to ... him a distinct authorial identity pivoted around writings of space, astronomy, religion, and the future of humanity.

Omnidoxy

The Omnidoxy is the founding treatise of the Astronist religion and was solely authored by the philosopher and religious founder, Cometan. Partitioned into twelve disquisitions, each of which are further divided into hundreds of discourses, which are themselves titled by those which are known as rubrals, The Omnidoxy has been codified according to a unique writing structure known as insentence. The Omnidoxy not only forms the foundations of Astronism, but it remains the primary modern contributor and the book that ignited the establishment of the Astronic tradition of religion which encompasses the philosophy of Astronism. Introducing brand new philosophical concepts such as cosmocentricity, reascensionism, transcensionism, and sentientism amongst many others, The Omnidoxy remains the principal signifier of a new era in philosophy. The Omnidoxy births hundreds of new belief orientations, schools of thought, neologisms, disciplines of study, theories, and concepts which, when combined and considered collectively, have formed the basis of Astronism. The authorship of The Omnidoxy rests with the single individual philosopher, Cometan who began writing The Omnidoxy at the age of seventeen driven by what he terms as personal inspiration. The historical origination of The Omnidoxy rests in its authorship by Brandon Taylorian during early 21st century England, specifically in the northern county of Lancashire. Like in all textual criticism, the timing and location of the codification of The Omnidoxy is integral to understanding why and how it was written, especially by considering the influential factors impacting Taylorian during his construction of the text, particularly the cultural, political, religious, and social contexts of Taylorian's personal life and of wider society at the time. This forms an important branch of study within omnidoxicology known as omnidoxical criticism, or omnidoxical exegesis in which scholars study and investigate The Omnidoxy in order to discern conclusive judgements inspired by how, where, why, by whom, for whom, and in what circumstances The Omnidoxy was written.

Karl Jaspers Philosophie

81-125 ; Jaspers , The Atombomb and the Future of Man , pp . 194-216 . 7 See Karl Jaspers , Philosophical Faith and Revelation , trans . by E. B. Ashton ( New York : Harper and Row , 1967 ) , p . 34 . 8 See Jaspers , Philosophy , vol .

Karl Jaspers  Philosophie