Philosophy of the Film

Examines the overlap between film and philosophy in three distinct ways: epistemological issues in film-making and viewing; aesthetic theory and film; and film as a medium of philosophical expression.

Philosophy of the Film

Examines the overlap between film and philosophy in three distinct ways: epistemological issues in film-making and viewing; aesthetic theory and film; and film as a medium of philosophical expression.

Film and Knowledge

By collision.4 But Eisenstein was not the only pioneering philosopher of film in those early days. As Ian Jarvie indicates in his book Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics, the first professional philosopher (and ...

Film and Knowledge

Film has become such an underpinning of art and pop culture that its potential for inspiring serious thought is often overlooked. Our intellectual involvement with film has been minimized as more in the audience want to be merely amazed and entertained. Essays written by both established and cutting-edge philosophers of film concentrate in this work on the value of film in general and the value of certain films in particular for the study and teaching of ideas. The essays explore such topics as the significance of narrative unity for self knowledge in David Lynch's Lost Highway and in Paul Schrader's Affliction; ambiguity and responsibility in Akira Kurosawa's Rashomon; consciousness and cognition in Orson Welles's Citizen Kane; skepticism in Alfred Hitchcock's Suspicion and David Cronenberg's Naked Lunch; language and gender in Neil Jordan's The Crying Game; Platonic idealism in Chris Marker's La Jetee; race in Spike Lee's Summer of Sam; the concept of the imagination in cognitive film theory; and the role of ideology in feminist film theory. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film

Ian Jarvie, Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics (New York: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1987), argues that film is art, and responds to arguments skeptical of this point of view. Another defense of the realist film ...

The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film

The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film is the first comprehensive volume to explore the main themes, topics, thinkers and issues in philosophy and film. The Companion features sixty specially commissioned chapters from international scholars and is divided into four clear parts: • issues and concepts • authors and trends • genres • film as philosophy. Part one is a comprehensive section examining key concepts, including chapters on acting, censorship, character, depiction, ethics, genre, interpretation, narrative, reception and spectatorship and style. Part two covers authors and scholars of film and significant theories Part three examines genres such as documentary, experimental cinema, horror, comedy and tragedy. Part four includes chapters on key directors such as Tarkovsky, Bergman and Terrence Malick and on particular films including Memento. Each chapter includes a section of annotated further reading and is cross-referenced to related entries. The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Film is essential reading for anyone interested in philosophy of film, aesthetics and film and cinema studies.

The Palgrave Handbook of the Philosophy of Film and Motion Pictures

Mystifying Movies: Fads and Fallacies in Contemporary Film Theory. New York: Columbia University ... A Philosophy of Mass Art. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ———. 2003. ... Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics.

The Palgrave Handbook of the Philosophy of Film and Motion Pictures

This handbook brings together essays in the philosophy of film and motion pictures from authorities across the spectrum. It boasts contributions from philosophers and film theorists alike, with many essays employing pluralist approaches to this interdisciplinary subject. Core areas treated include film ontology, film structure, psychology, authorship, narrative, and viewer emotion. Emerging areas of interest, including virtual reality, video games, and nonfictional and autobiographical film also have dedicated chapters. Other areas of focus include the film medium’s intersection with contemporary social issues, film’s kinship to other art forms, and the influence of historically seminal schools of thought in the philosophy of film. Of emphasis in many of the essays is the relationship and overlap of analytic and continental perspectives in this subject.

New Philosophies of Film

(2010), A Philosophy of Cinematic Art. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Jarvie, Ian. (1987), Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics. London: Routledge. Mullarkey, John. (2009), Refractions of Reality: ...

New Philosophies of Film

This is a critical exploration of analytic and Continental philosophies of film, which puts film-philosophy into practice with detailed discussions of three filmmakers. The book includes philosophical readings of three key contemporary filmmakers: Malick, Lynch and Von Trier. It also features links to online resources, guides to further reading and a filmography.

Skepticism Films

The sociologist-philosopher Jarvie published his Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics in 1987, preceded by Towards a Sociology of the Cinema (1970). Like Cavell, Jarvie broadens the scope of philosophical ...

Skepticism Films

Skepticism Films: Knowing and Doubting the World in Contemporary Cinema introduces skepticism films as updated configurations of skepticist thought experiments which exemplify the pervasiveness of philosophical ideas in popular culture. Philipp Schmerheim defends a pluralistic film-philosophical position according to which films can be, but need not be, expressions of philosophical thought in their own right. It critically investigates the influence of ideas of skepticism on film-philosophical theories and develops a typology of skepticism films by analyzing The Truman Show, Inception, The Matrix, Vanilla Sky, The Thirteenth Floor, Moon and other contemporary skepticism films. With its focus on skepticism as one of the most significant philosophical problems, Skepticism Films provides a better understanding of the dynamic interplay between film, theories of film and philosophy.

Philosophy and Film

In Ethics: Essential Works of Foucault 1954–1982, Volume 1, edited by Paul Rabinow, 303–19. London: Penguin 1997.Jarvie, Ian. Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics. New York and London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1987.

Philosophy and Film

This volume collects twenty original essays on the philosophy of film. It uniquely brings together scholars working across a range of philosophical traditions and academic disciplines to broaden and advance debates on film and philosophy. The book includes contributions from a number of prominent philosophers of film including Noël Carroll, Chris Falzon, Deborah Knight, Paisley Livingston, Robert Sinnerbrink, Malcolm Turvey, and Thomas Wartenberg. While the topics explored by the contributors are diverse, there are a number of thematic threads that connect them. Overall, the book seeks to bridge analytic and continental approaches to philosophy of film in fruitful ways. Moving to the individual essays, the first two sections offer novel takes on the philosophical value and the nature of film. The next section focuses on the film-as-philosophy debate. Section IV covers cinematic experience, while Section V includes interpretations of individual films that touch on questions of artificial intelligence, race and film, and cinema’s biopolitical potential. Finally, the last section proposes new avenues for future research on the moving image beyond film. This book will appeal to a broad range of scholars working in film studies, theory, and philosophy.

A Critical Rationalist Aesthetics

In Search of a Philosophy and History of Anthropology. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, p. 163. -------------. 1987. Philosophy of the Film. Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics. ... “Is Analytic Philosophy the Cure for Film Theory?

A Critical Rationalist Aesthetics

This book is a first attempt to cover the whole area of aesthetics from the point of view of critical rationalism. It takes up and expands upon the more narrowly focused work of E. H. Gombrich, Sheldon Richmond, and Raphael Sassower and Louis Ciccotello. The authors integrate the arts into the scientific world view and acknowledge that there is an aesthetic aspect to anything whatsoever. They pay close attention to the social situatedness of the arts. Their aesthetics treats art as emerging from craft in the form of luxurious and playful challenge to the audience. In developing it they place emphasis on the number of questions and claims that can be settled by appeal to empirical facts; on the historical character of aesthetic judgements; and on the connection of aesthetic truth to true love and true friendship, i.e. fidelity and integrity, not to informative truth.

Refractions of Reality Philosophy and the Moving Image

Horror Film Reader,r Routledge, 2002, pp. 1–19. Jarvie, I.C., Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics, Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1987. Jayamanne, Laleen, '“Forty Acres and a Mule Filmworks” – DO THE RIGHT THING – “A ...

Refractions of Reality  Philosophy and the Moving Image

This is the first book to explore all central issues surrounding the relationship between the film-image and philosophy. It tackles the work of particular philosophers of film (Žižek, Deleuze and Cavell) as well as general philosophical positions (Cognitivist and Culturalist), and analyses the ability of film to teach and create philosophy.

A Philosophy of Cinematic Art

Jarvie, Ian, Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics, New York: Routledge SC Kegan Paul, 1987. ... Kania, Andrew, 'The Illusion of Realism in Film', British journal of Aesthetics, 42 (2002): 243-58.

A Philosophy of Cinematic Art

A wide-ranging and accessible study of cinema as an art form, discussing traditional photographic films, digital cinema, and videogames.

Philosophy Goes to the Movies

Freiberger, Eric (1996) 'Projecting the Real: Tornatore's “Cinema Paradiso”', Film and Philosophy 3: 107–122. ... Jarvie, Ian (1987) Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics, New York/London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

Philosophy Goes to the Movies

Now emulated in several competing publications, but still unsurpassed in clarity and insight, Philosophy Goes to the Movies: An Introduction to Philosophy, Third Edition builds on the approach that made the two earlier editions so successful. Drawing on many popular and some lesser known films from around the world, Christopher Falzon introduces students to key areas in philosophy, like: • Ethics • Social and Political Philosophy • The Theory of Knowledge • The Self and Personal Identity • Critical Thinking Perfect for beginners, this book guides the reader through philosophy using illuminating cinematic works, like Avatar, Inception, Fight Club, Wings of Desire, Run Lola Run, A Clockwork Orange, Blade Runner, Dirty Harry and many other films. The fully revised and updated Third Edition features: an expanded introduction that provides a new discussion of the relationship between film and philosophy; new material on notable philosophers such as Aristotle, Merleau-Ponty and Rawls; and coverage of new topics like virtue ethics and what Socrates offers for critical thinking. An updated glossary, references and bibliography, and a filmography, are also included in the Third Edition.

Cinema Philosophy Bergman

'Experiential Theories of Aesthetic Value', in Richard Shusterman and Adele Tomlin, eds., Aesthetic Experience. London: Routledge, 2008, 45–58. Jarvie, Ian. Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics.

Cinema  Philosophy  Bergman

Can cinema be a medium for philosophy? If so, how is the philosophizing done? Paisley Livingston explores the philosophical value of cinema. As a case-study for his intentionalist theory of authorship and interpretation he focuses on Ingmar Bergman's cinematic explorations of motivated irrationality, inauthenticity, and self-knowledge.

Cinematic Philosophy

Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 64(1), 119–133. Gunning, T. (1996). An aesthetic of astonishment. In L. Williams (Ed.), Viewing positions: Ways of seeing film (pp. ... Philosophy of the film: Epistemology, ontology, aesthetics.

Cinematic Philosophy

In this book, Tal S. Shamir sets out to identify cinema as a novel medium for philosophy and an important way of manifesting and developing philosophical thought. The volume presents a comprehensive analysis of the nature of philosophy’s potential—or, more strongly put, its need—to be manifested cinematically. Drawing on the fields of cinema, philosophy, and media studies, Cinematic Philosophy adds film to the traditional list of ways through which philosophy can be created, concentrating on the unique potential of the cinematic medium to effectively put forward and create philosophy. In the process, the book opens up innovative horizons for new types of knowledge and wisdom grounded in contemporary contexts and philosophical thought. Philosophy, best characterized as the love of wisdom, is not dependent on a specific medium nor solely situated within written text or oral lectures. Shamir asserts that philosophy can, should, and must be manifested and identified in a range of different platforms.

European Film Theory

Berys Gaut, “The Philosophy of the Movies: Cinematic Narration,” in Peter Kivy (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aesthetics (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2004), 230–53. Ian Jarvie, Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics ...

European Film Theory

European Film Theory explores the ‘Europeanness’ of European film theory, its philosophical origins, the ‘culture wars’ between ‘Continental’ and ‘Analytical’ film theory and philosophy, the major discursive and epistemological shifts in the history of Continental film theory, the relationship between Continental philosophy of art and philosophy of history and European film theory. Writing from a range of disciplines and perspectives, the contributors to this new volume in the AFI FILM READERS series offer fresh interpretations of European film theorists and illuminate the political potential of European film theory.

Conceiving Virtuality From Art To Technology

Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70: 19–30. Bazin, André. 1951/1967 ... International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22: 716–733. Cameron, Evan. ... Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics. London: Routledge.

Conceiving Virtuality  From Art To Technology

This book provides new theoretical approaches to the subject of virtuality. All chapters reflect the importance of extending the analysis of the concept of “the virtual” to areas of knowledge that, until today, have not been fully included in its philosophical foundations. The respective chapters share new insights on art, media, psychic systems and technology, while also presenting new ways of articulating the concept of the virtual with regard to the main premises of Western thought. Given its thematic scope, this book is intended not only for a philosophical audience, but also for all scientists who have turned to the humanities in search of answers to their questions.

Narrative Comprehension and Film

Epistemic Analysis. In Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (Winter 1986): 205—9. ... __ “Film and System: Terms of Analysis 2.” Screen 16 (Summer 1975): 91—113. ... Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics.

Narrative Comprehension and Film

Narrative is one of the ways we organise and understnad the world. It is found everywhere: not only in films and books, but also in everday conversations and in the nonfictional discourses of journalists, historians, educators, psychologists, attorneys and many others. Edward Branigan presents a telling exploration of the basic concepts of narrative theory and its relation to film - and literary - analysis, bringing together theories from linguistics and cognitive science, and applying them to the screen. Individual analyses of classical narratives form the basis of a complex study of every aspect of filmic fiction exploring, for example, subjectivity in Lady in the Lake, multiplicity in Letter from and Unknown Woman, post-modernism and documentary in Sans Soleil.

Film As Ethnography

( 1988 ) , Cinematographic Theory and New Dimensions in Ethnographic Film , Senri Ethnological Studies , no . 24 , Osaka . Jarvie , I. ( 1987 ) , Philosophy of the Film . Epistemology , Ontology , Aesthetics , New York ...

Film As Ethnography

This work examines the reasons why anthropologists have not used the camera as a research instrument or film as a means of communicating ethnographic knowledge. It suggests that images and words in this discipline operate on different logical levels; that they are hierarchically related; that whereas writings may encompass the images produced by film, the inverse of this cannot be true. The author argues for this position further by suggesting that the visual is to the written mode as "thin description" (giving a record of the form of behaviour) is to "thick description" (giving an account of meaning).

Snow Forest Silence

Philosophy of the Film : Epistemology , Ontology , Aesthetics . New York and London : Routledge & Kegan Paul . Lotman , J. ( 1976 ) . Semiotics of Cinema . Ann Arbor , MI : University of Michigan Press . Mast , G. and Cohen , M. ( eds . ) ...

Snow  Forest  Silence

Thirty high-level essays on various aspects of semiotics by Finnish, Estonian, and Hungarian scholars.

Transitioning to Quality Education

Charlotte: Information Age Publishing, pp. 33–51. Jarvie, Ian C. 2003. Philosophy of the Film: Epistemology, Ontology, Aesthetics. London and New York: Routledge. Kalin, Boris. 1973. History of Philosophy with Philosophical Texts.

Transitioning to Quality Education

Transitioning to Quality Education focuses on the fourth UN Sustainable Development Goal. According to SDG 4, every learner should acquire the knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development (UN 2015, 17). Thus, the aim of sustainability education is to foster learners to be creative and responsible global citizens, who critically reflect on the ideas of sustainable development and the values that underlie them, and take responsible actions for sustainable development (UNESCO 2017). Sustainability is strongly connected to attitudes and values, therefore, applications of sustainability are complicated. Quality education requires teachers to have competences, knowledge, and skills to be able to plan and carry out meaningful education and teaching in sustainability. The aim of Transitioning to Quality Education is to provide versatile experiences and new knowledge on the cognitive, affective, and social issues that are important for promoting sustainable development in formal and non-formal education. Transitioning to Quality Education is part of MDPI's new Open Access book series Transitioning to Sustainability. With this series, MDPI pursues environmentally and socially relevant research which contributes to efforts toward a sustainable world. Transitioning to Sustainability aims to add to the conversation about regional and global sustainable development according to the 17 SDGs. Set to be published in 2020/2021, the book series is intended to reach beyond disciplinary, even academic boundaries.

The Ethics of Witness

Philosophy of the film: Epistemology, ontology, aesthetics. New York: Routledge & Kegan Paul Inc. Jean-Paul, F. (1969). Parenthesis or Indirect Route. In Screen Reader 1. Cinéthique 5. Kaes, A. (1992). From Hitler to Heimat: The return ...

The Ethics of Witness

This book explores the aesthetic and ethical ways in which history and daily life are filmically represented and witnessed in Taiwanese director Hou Hsiao-hsien’s movies. From the era of the Japanese Occupation to the White Horror and then to the lifting of martial law, the author shows how Hou Hsiao-hsien uses visual media to evoke the rhythms of daily life through the emotional memory of the characters and communities he explores. In particular, the book focuses on the ways in which Hou Hsiao-hsien seeks to reflect the strong dilemmas of identity and the traumatic emotions associated with witnessing history. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, it investigates the concepts of daily life, representation and historical trauma in order to focus on how these films represent history and political trauma through the nature of daily life and personal memories, and the resulting historical responsibility and ethics. This is the first academic monography about Hou Hsiao-hsien’s films.