Photography After Frank

Photography After Frank

In Photography After Frank, former New York Times writer and picture editor Philip Gefter presents the tale of contemporary photography, starting with a pivotal moment: Robert Franks seminal work in the 1950s. Along the way, he connects the dots of photographys transformation into what it is today. Gefter begins with Franks challenge to the notion of photographys objectivity with the grainy, off-handed spontaneity of The Americans. Next comes the staged document and postmodernisms further challenge to image fidelity. Other themes are photojournalism, the diversity of portraiture, the influence of private and corporate collections on curatorial decisions, and how the market shapes art making. Throughout the book, Gefter deftly connects Franks legacy with the work of dozens of important individual artists who followed in his wake, from Lee Friedlander and Nan Goldin to Stephen Shore and Ryan McGinley. The book includes texts written exclusively for this publication as well as essays drawn from Gefters critical writings, reviews, and even obituaries. Photography After Frank offers a page-turning yet journalistic approach bound to appeal to students and artworld aficionados, alike.

Frank Hurley: A Photographer's Life

Frank Hurley: A Photographer's Life

Photographer, filmmaker, writer, adventurer. Controversial, passionate, audacious. Frank Hurley was an extraordinary Australian, possibly most famous for his Antarctic photographs captured alongside expeditioners Sir Douglas Mawson and Sir Ernest Shackleton. From the early twentieth century until his death in 1962 Hurley created a stunning visual archive that chronicled the major events of the twentieth century, and Australia's achievements both home and overseas. This book and the Hurley Collection in the National Library of Australia make clear this outstanding contribution and the lengths to which the man would go in order to convey the gravity of events. For Hurley, image-making and exploration went hand-in-hand and he sought out experiences as a pioneer documentary film-maker, official photographer in two world wars, early aviator, and adventure and story-seeker in both the natural environment and in rapidly disappearing non-western worlds. In this readable, definitive and wonderfully illustrated re-issued biography, Alasdair McGregor describes Hurley's life and character in all its richness.

What Do Pictures Want?

The Lives and Loves of Images

What Do Pictures Want?

Why do we have such extraordinarily powerful responses toward the images and pictures we see in everyday life? Why do we behave as if pictures were alive, possessing the power to influence us, to demand things from us, to persuade us, seduce us, or even lead us astray? According to W. J. T. Mitchell, we need to reckon with images not just as inert objects that convey meaning but as animated beings with desires, needs, appetites, demands, and drives of their own. What Do Pictures Want? explores this idea and highlights Mitchell's innovative and profoundly influential thinking on picture theory and the lives and loves of images. Ranging across the visual arts, literature, and mass media, Mitchell applies characteristically brilliant and wry analyses to Byzantine icons and cyberpunk films, racial stereotypes and public monuments, ancient idols and modern clones, offensive images and found objects, American photography and aboriginal painting. Opening new vistas in iconology and the emergent field of visual culture, he also considers the importance of Dolly the Sheep—who, as a clone, fulfills the ancient dream of creating a living image—and the destruction of the World Trade Center on 9/11, which, among other things, signifies a new and virulent form of iconoclasm. What Do Pictures Want? offers an immensely rich and suggestive account of the interplay between the visible and the readable. A work by one of our leading theorists of visual representation, it will be a touchstone for art historians, literary critics, anthropologists, and philosophers alike. “A treasury of episodes—generally overlooked by art history and visual studies—that turn on images that ‘walk by themselves’ and exert their own power over the living.”—Norman Bryson, Artforum

Train Your Gaze

A Practical and Theoretical Introduction to Portrait Photography

Train Your Gaze

Focusing on the presence of the photographer's gaze as an integral part of constructing meaningful images, Roswell Angier combines theory and practice, to provide you with the technical advice and inspiration you need to develop your skills in portrait photography. Fully updated to take into account advances in creative work and photographic technology, this second edition also includes stunning new visuals and a discussion on the role of social media in the practice of portraiture. Each chapter includes a practical assignment, designed to help you explore various kinds of portrait photography and produce a range of different styles for your creative portfolio.

Wagstaff: Before and After Mapplethorpe: A Biography

Wagstaff: Before and After Mapplethorpe: A Biography

This "admiring and absorbing biography" (Deborah Solomon, The New York Times Book Review) charts Sam Wagstaff's incalculable influence on contemporary art, photography, and gay identity. A legendary curator, collector, and patron of the arts, Sam Wagstaff was a "figure who stood at the intersection of gay life and the art world and brought glamour and daring to both" (Andrew Solomon). Now, in Philip Gefter's groundbreaking biography, he emerges as a cultural visionary. Gefter documents the influence of the man who—although known today primarily as the mentor and lover of Robert Mapplethorpe—"almost invented the idea of photography as art" (Edmund White). Wagstaff: Before and After Mapplethorpe braids together Wagstaff's personal transformation from closeted society bachelor to a rebellious curator with a broader portrait of the tumultuous social, cultural, and sexual upheavals of the 1960s, '70s, and '80s, creating a definitive portrait of a man and his era.

Photography and Politics in America

From the New Deal Into the Cold War

Photography and Politics in America

"In this book, Bezner brings back many of those silenced voices and offers the first detailed analysis of social documentary photography from the Depression through the early cold war years. She explores the little-known history of the controversial, blacklisted Photo League and leading member Sid Grossman. And she recalls some of the most important moments in American photographic history of the 1950s, such as Edward Steichen's blockbuster exhibition, The Family of Man, and Robert Frank's influential book, The Americans."--BOOK JACKET.

Photography

Photography

"John Ingledew: Photography provides a basic introduction for students across the visual arts. This accessible, inspirational guide to creative photography explores the subjects and themes that have always obsessed photographers and explains technique in a clear and simple way. Embracing the whole spectrum of photography from traditional to digital, it introduces the work of the masters of the art as well as showing fresh, dynamic images created by young photographers from all over the world. An essential resource, the book also provides a valuable overview of careers in photography and a comprehensive reference section, including a glossary of technical vocabulary."--BOOK JACKET.

Frank Hurley's Antarctica

Frank Hurley's Antarctica

Frank Hurley is best known for his stunning Antarctic photographs. Here, Helen Ennis discusses some of his most famous images and the conditions in which they were taken.