Physics of Highly Ionized Atoms

The progress in the physics of highly-ionized atoms since the last NATO sponsored ASI on this subject in 1982 has been enormous.

Physics of Highly Ionized Atoms

The progress in the physics of highly-ionized atoms since the last NATO sponsored ASI on this subject in 1982 has been enormous. New accelerator facilities capable of extending the range of highly-ionized ions to very high-Z have come on line or are about to be completed. We note particularly the GANIL accelerator in Caen, France, the Michigan State Superconducting Cyclotrons in East Lansing both of which are currently operating and the SIS Accelerator in Darmstadt, FRG which is scheduled to accelerate beam in late 1989. Progress i~ low-energy ion production has been equally dramatic. The Lawrence Livermore Lab EBIT device has produced neon-like gold and there has been continued improvement in ECR and EBIS sources. The scientific developments in this field have kept pace with the technical developments. New theoretical methods for evaluating relativistic and QED effects have made possible highly-precise calcula tions of energy levels in one-and two-electron ions at high-Z. The calculations are based on the MCDF method and the variational method and will be subject to rigorous experimental tests. On the experimental side, precision x-ray and UV measurements have probed the Lamb shift in the one and two electron ions up to Z=36 with increasing precision.

Atomic Physics of Highly Ionized Atoms

The last decade has seen dramatic progress in the development of devices for producing mu1ticharged ions. Indeed it is now pos sible to produce any charge state of any ion right up through 92 fully-stripped uranium (U +).

Atomic Physics of Highly Ionized Atoms

The last decade has seen dramatic progress in the development of devices for producing mu1ticharged ions. Indeed it is now pos sible to produce any charge state of any ion right up through 92 fully-stripped uranium (U +). Equally dramatic progress has been achieved in the energy range of the available ions. As an example, fully-stripped neon ions have been produced in useable quantities with kinetic energies ranging from a few ev to more than 20 Gev. Interest in the atomic physics of multicharged ions has grown apace. In the fusion program, the spectra of these ions is an im portant diagnostic tool. Moreover the presence of mu1ticharged ions presents a serious energy loss mechanism in fusion devices. This fact has motivated a program to study the collision mech anisms involved. In another area, mu1ticharged ions are present in the solar corona and the interstellar medium and knowledge of their collision properties and spectra is essential to understand ing the astrophysics. Other possible applications are to x-ray lasers and heavy ion inertial fusion. On a more fundamental level, new possibilities for testing quantum electrodynamics with mu1ti charged ions have emerged.

Physics of Highly Ionized Atoms

The progress in the physics of highly-ionized atoms since the last NATO sponsored ASI on this subject in 1982 has been enormous.

Physics of Highly Ionized Atoms

The progress in the physics of highly-ionized atoms since the last NATO sponsored ASI on this subject in 1982 has been enormous. New accelerator facilities capable of extending the range of highly-ionized ions to very high-Z have come on line or are about to be completed. We note particularly the GANIL accelerator in Caen, France, the Michigan State Superconducting Cyclotrons in East Lansing both of which are currently operating and the SIS Accelerator in Darmstadt, FRG which is scheduled to accelerate beam in late 1989. Progress i~ low-energy ion production has been equally dramatic. The Lawrence Livermore Lab EBIT device has produced neon-like gold and there has been continued improvement in ECR and EBIS sources. The scientific developments in this field have kept pace with the technical developments. New theoretical methods for evaluating relativistic and QED effects have made possible highly-precise calcula tions of energy levels in one-and two-electron ions at high-Z. The calculations are based on the MCDF method and the variational method and will be subject to rigorous experimental tests. On the experimental side, precision x-ray and UV measurements have probed the Lamb shift in the one and two electron ions up to Z=36 with increasing precision.

Atomic Physics of Highly Charged Ions

This book contains the invited lectures and contributed papers presented at the V International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions, which was held at the lustus-Liebig-Universi tat Giessen, 10-14 September 1990.

Atomic Physics of Highly Charged Ions

This book contains the invited lectures and contributed papers presented at the V International Conference on the Physics of Highly Charged Ions, which was held at the lustus-Liebig-Universi tat Giessen, 10-14 September 1990. This conference was the ftfth in a series -after Stockholm (1982), Oxford (1984), Groningen (1986) and Grenoble (1988) -to deal with a rapidly growing fteld, which comprises the spectroscopy of highly charged ions and their interactions with photons, electrons, atoms, ions, and solids. Most of the matter of the universe is in the ionized state. Investigations dealing with hot plasmas on earth have been greatly furthered by thermonuclear-fusion research. The increasing maturity of this programme has revealed the fundamental role of highly charged ions in fusion plasmas. Today, it is clear that a detailed knowledge of the production mechanisms of highly charged ions and their interactions with other plasma constituents is an important prerequisite for a better understanding of the microscopic and macroscopic plasma properties. The study of highly charged ions involves various branches of physics. It was the aim of the conference to bring together physicists working in atomic collisions and spectroscopy, in plasma physics and astrophysics, as well as in solid-state and ion-source physics. About 220 scientists from 20 nations attended the conference, indicating the strong worldwide interest and the vital ity of research in this fteld.

Summary of Informal Meeting on facilities for Atomic Physics Research with Highly Ionized Atoms

An informal meeting to discuss ''Facilities for Atomic Physics Research with Highly Ionized Atoms'' was held during the APS DEAP meeting at the University of Connecticut on May 30, 1984.

Summary of Informal Meeting on   facilities for Atomic Physics Research with Highly Ionized Atoms

An informal meeting to discuss ''Facilities for Atomic Physics Research with Highly Ionized Atoms'' was held during the APS DEAP meeting at the University of Connecticut on May 30, 1984. The meeting was motivated by the realization that the status of facilities for studies of highly ionized atoms is unsettled and that it might be desirable to take action to ensure adequate resources for research over the whole range of charge states and energies of interest. It was assumed that the science to be done with these beams has been amply documented in the literature.

Theoretical Research in Physics of Highly Ionized Atoms Final Report March 1 1975 June 30 1976 Preliminary Study Transition Probabilities Model Potential Theory Dirac and Schroedinger Equations

Results of a preliminary study of the use of a model potential approach to the calculation of energy levels and radiative transition probabilities for highly ionized heavy atoms are reported.

Theoretical Research in Physics of Highly Ionized Atoms  Final Report  March 1  1975  June 30  1976   Preliminary Study  Transition Probabilities  Model Potential Theory  Dirac and Schroedinger Equations

Results of a preliminary study of the use of a model potential approach to the calculation of energy levels and radiative transition probabilities for highly ionized heavy atoms are reported. The calculations were carried out for eight ions in the sodium isoelectronic sequence from Mg II through W LXIV. The technique used involved the solution of the Dirac equation for the single outer valence electron, with a model central potential containing two disposable parameters affecting the potential in the region of the atomic core. The effect of core polarization was incorporated in the model potential. The parameters in the model potential were chosen by an initial solution of the nonrelativistic Schroedinger equation for the single outer valence electron, with the requirement that calculated ionization energies reproduce the results of the best available nonrelativistic calculations. Comparison of results for nonrelativistic radiative transition probabilities provides the first check on the technique. Solutions of the Dirac equation are then compared with the results of other relativistic calculations and experimental measurements. The results, for both energy levels and radiative transition probabilities, are encouraging, and suggest that the wave functions obtained will be quite satisfactory for subsequent calculations of electron impact excitation of these ions.

Physics of Highly Excited Atoms and Ions

The principle objective of the present book is to reflect the most important physical approaches and efficient theoretical techniques in the modem physics of highly excited atoms and ions.

Physics of Highly Excited Atoms and Ions

This monograph is devoted to the basic aspects of the physics of highly ex cited (Rydberg) states of atom's. After almost twenty years, this remains a hot topic of modern atomic physics. Such studies are important for many areas of physics and its applications including spectroscopy, astrophysics and radio astronomy, physics of electronic and atomic collisions, kinetics and di agnostics of gases, and low- and high-temperature plasmas. Physical phenom ena in radiative, collisional, and spectral-line broadening processes involving Rydberg atoms and ions are primarily determined by the peculiar properties and exotic features of highly excited states. The growth of interest and research activity in the physics of Rydberg the last two decades was stimulated by an extremely rapid de atoms over velopment of high-resolution laser spectroscopy, methods of selective excita tion and detection of highly excited states, atomic-beam techniques as well as radio astronomy. This has facilitated significant progress in the differ ent directions of the physics of highly excited atoms being of fundamental and practical importance. In particular, evident advances were achieved in studies of the structure and spectra of highly excited atoms, their behavior in static electric and magnetic fields, interactions with electromagnetic ra diation, spectral-line broadening and the shift of Rydberg series, collisions with electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules, etc. The principle objective of the present book is to reflect the most important physical approaches and efficient theoretical techniques in the modem physics of highly excited atoms and ions.

Study of Atomic Physics and Population Inversions with Plasma Focus

The plasma focus can be used to generate high temperature and high density plasmas. Neon-like plasmas have previously been studied in Z-pinches and laser produced plasmas as sources for XUV and x-ray lasers.

Study of Atomic Physics and Population Inversions with Plasma Focus

The plasma focus can be used to generate high temperature and high density plasmas. Neon-like plasmas have previously been studied in Z-pinches and laser produced plasmas as sources for XUV and x-ray lasers. The plasma focus provides a simple and inexpensive source for studying atomic physics of highly ionized atoms. A detailed understanding of atomic physics at high temperatures, densities, and megagauss magnetic fields is necessary for possible x-ray laser designs. Methods that are generally used for obtaining population inversions include collisional ionization of the inner shells of multi-electron atoms and ions, photoexcitation, and electron collisional excitation of ions, collisional combination of ions, and atom-ion resonant charge exchange. We will discuss some possible experiments to help understand the atomic physics under the above condition. Some ideas and calculations will be given to show the feasibility of doing atomic physics relating to x-ray lasers with a plasma focus. 13 refs., 2 figs.

Spectral Data for Highly Ionized Atoms Ti V Cr Mn Fe Co NI Cu Kr and Mo

Short reviews on the line identifications and wavelength measurements are given for each stage of ionization. The general introduction contains a discussion on the method of evaluation and some background on the compilations.

Spectral Data for Highly Ionized Atoms  Ti  V  Cr  Mn  Fe  Co  NI  Cu  Kr  and Mo

These comprehensive spectroscopic data tables for the spectra of highly ionized heavy atoms provide a valuable resource for researchers who need detailed spectroscopic information on energy levels, wavelengths, ionization energies, and oscillator strengths. Critically evaluated data for these spectroscopic quantities, both observed and calculated, are tabulated for the elements Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Kr, and Mo. The tables include data for all stages of ionization from Ca-like through H-like spectra, except for Kr and Mo, which start at Ge-like and Rb-like, respectively. Typically, several hundred transitions are covered for each spectrum. The tables are arranged in order of decreasing wavelengths, and lines belonging to the same multiplet are grouped together. Forbidden lines, i.e., mainly magnetic dipole (M1) and electric quadrupole (E2) transitions are also included and are identified as such. A unified finding list, in which lines are ordered according to wavelengths, contains all the tabulated transitions. Short reviews on the line identifications and wavelength measurements are given for each stage of ionization. The general introduction contains a discussion on the method of evaluation and some background on the compilations.

Physics of Highly Ionized Atoms

Proceedings of a NATO Advanced Study Institute on Atomic Physics of Highly-lonized Atoms, held June 5–15, 1988, in Cargese, France Library of Congress ...

Physics of Highly Ionized Atoms

The progress in the physics of highly-ionized atoms since the last NATO sponsored ASI on this subject in 1982 has been enormous. New accelerator facilities capable of extending the range of highly-ionized ions to very high-Z have come on line or are about to be completed. We note particularly the GANIL accelerator in Caen, France, the Michigan State Superconducting Cyclotrons in East Lansing both of which are currently operating and the SIS Accelerator in Darmstadt, FRG which is scheduled to accelerate beam in late 1989. Progress i~ low-energy ion production has been equally dramatic. The Lawrence Livermore Lab EBIT device has produced neon-like gold and there has been continued improvement in ECR and EBIS sources. The scientific developments in this field have kept pace with the technical developments. New theoretical methods for evaluating relativistic and QED effects have made possible highly-precise calcula tions of energy levels in one-and two-electron ions at high-Z. The calculations are based on the MCDF method and the variational method and will be subject to rigorous experimental tests. On the experimental side, precision x-ray and UV measurements have probed the Lamb shift in the one and two electron ions up to Z=36 with increasing precision.

The Effects of Relativity in Atoms Molecules and the Solid State

Recent years have seen a growing interest in the effects of relativity in atoms, molecules and solids.

The Effects of Relativity in Atoms  Molecules  and the Solid State

Recent years have seen a growing interest in the effects of relativity in atoms, molecules and solids. On the one hand, this can be seen as result of the growing awareness of the importance of relativity in describing the properties of heavy atoms and systems containing them. This has been fueled by the inadequacy of physical models which either neglect relativity or which treat it as a small perturbation. On the other hand, it is dependent upon the technological developments which have resulted in computers powerful enough to make calculations on heavy atoms and on systems containing heavy atoms meaningful. Vector processing and, more recently, parallel processing techniques are playing an increasingly vital role in rendering the algorithms which arise in relativistic studies tractable. This has been exemplified in atomic structure theory, where the dominant role of the central nuclear charge simplifies the problem enough to permit some prediction to be made with high precision, especially for the highly ionized atoms of importance in plasma physics and in laser confinement studies. Today's sophisticated physical models of the atom derived from quantum electrodynamics would be intractable without recourse to modern computational machinery. Relativistic atomic structure calculations have a history dating from the early attempts of Swirles in the mid 1930's but continue to provide one of the primary test beds of modern theoretical physics.