Pierre Charles Roy

This is a new release of the original 1930 edition.

Pierre Charles Roy

This is a new release of the original 1930 edition.

Les Elements

Les Elements


In the King s Wake

The " poète Roy " to whom Voltaire alludes here was Pierre - Charles Roy ( 1683—1764 ) , a mediocre rival and enemy , whom he also encountered at other stages of his career . " Nearly three years earlier , in summer ( ? ) ...

In the King s Wake

Long before the guillotines of the 1789 Revolution brought a grisly political end to the ancien régime, Jay Caplan argues, the culture of absolutism had already perished. In the King's Wake traces the emergence of a post-absolutist culture across a wide range of works and genres: Saint-Simon's memoirs of Louis XIV and the Regency; Voltaire's first tragedy, Oedipe; Watteau's last great painting, L'Enseigne de Gersaint; the plays of Marivaux; and Casanova's History of My Life. While absolutist culture had focused on value directly represented in people (e.g., those of noble blood) and things (e.g., coins made of precious metals), post-absolutist culture instead explored the capacity of signs to stand for something real (e.g., John Law's banknotes or Marivaux's plays in which actions rather than birth signify nobility). Between the image of the Sun King and visions of the godlike Romantic self, Caplan discovers a post-absolutist France wracked by surprisingly modern conflicts over the true sources of value and legitimacy.

A Critical Bibliography of French Literature V4 18th C

609 Best discussion of Regnard's plays , though not the last word on the subject . Not much attention given to Regnard's life . Roy , Pierre Charles . Polinger , Elliot H. Pierre Charles Roy , playwright and satirist ( 1683-1764 ) .

A Critical Bibliography of French Literature V4 18th C


French Baroque Opera A Reader

The librettist Pierre-Charles Roy (1683–1764), writing in the mid-eighteenth century, believed that opera was indeed subject to a 'lyric code' (4.2.i); although Quinault had never drawn up such a code, he argues, the definitive status ...

French Baroque Opera  A Reader

From the outset, French opera generated an enormous diversity of literature, familiarity with which greatly enhances our understanding of this unique art form. Yet relatively little of that literature is available in English, despite an upsurge of interest in the Lully-Rameau period during the past two decades. This book presents a wide-ranging and informative picture of the organization and evolution of French Baroque opera, its aims and aspirations, its strengths and weaknesses. Drawing on official documents, theoretical writings, letters, diaries, dictionary entries, contemporary reviews and commentaries, it provides an often entertaining insight into Lully’s once-proud Royal Academy of Music and the colourful characters who surrounded it. The translated passages are set in context, and readers are directed to further scholarly and critical writings in English. Readers will find this new, updated edition easier to use with its revised and expanded translations, supplementary explanatory content and new illustrations.

New Perspectives on Marc Antoine Charpentier

36 This idea is suggested by Emmanuel Minel in his edition of Hilaire-Bernard de Longepierre,Médée (Paris, 2000), pp. ... 39 This is discussed in Longepierre, Médée, ed. ... 44 Libretto by Pierre-Charles Roy; music by Louis Lacoste.

New Perspectives on Marc Antoine Charpentier

The tercentenary of Marc-Antoine Charpentier's death in 2004 stimulated a surge of activity on the part of performers and scholars, confirming the modern assessment of Charpentier (1643-1704) as one of the most important and inventive composers of the French Baroque. The present book provides a snapshot of Charpentier scholarship in the early years of the new century. Its 13 chapters illustrate not only the sheer variety of strands currently pursued, but also the way in which these strands frequently intertwine and generate the potential for future research. Between them, they examine facets of the composer's compositional language and process, aspects of his performance practice and notation, the contexts within which he worked, and the nature of his legacy. The appendix contains a transcription of the inventory of Charpentier's manuscripts prepared when their sale to the Royal Library was negotiated in 1726 - an invaluable research tool, as numerous chapters in the book demonstrate. The wide variety of topics covered here will appeal both to readers interested in Charpentier's music and to those with a broader interest in the music and culture of the French Baroque, including aspects of patronage, church and theatre. Far from treating his output in isolation, this book places it in the wider context alongside such composers as Lully, Lalande, Marais, Fran?s Couperin and Rameau; it also views the composer in relation to his Italian training. In the process, the under-examined question of influence - who influenced Charpentier? whom did he influence? - repeatedly comes to the fore. The book's Foreword was written by H. Wiley Hitchcock shortly before he died. Hitchcock's own part in raising the profile of Charpentier and his music to the level of recognition which it now enjoys cannot be emphasized enough. Appropriately the volume is dedicated to his memory.

Opera in the Age of Rousseau

1743,64 his tract was fairly vicious about Cahusac's librettos - whether as poetry or as concepts - and Roy was no friend of ... Pierre Charles Roy, Playwright and Satirist (1683-1764) (New York: Institute of French Studies, 1930), 79.

Opera in the Age of Rousseau

Historians of French politics, art, philosophy and literature have long known the tensions and fascinations of Louis XV's reign, the 1750s in particular. David Charlton's study comprehensively re-examines this period, from Rameau to Gluck and elucidates the long-term issues surrounding opera. Taking Rousseau's Le Devin du Village as one narrative centrepiece, Charlton investigates this opera's origins and influences in the 1740s and goes on to use past and present research to create a new structural model that explains the elements of reform in Gluck's tragédies for Paris. Charlton's book opens many new perspectives on the musical practices and politics of the period, including the Querelle des Bouffons. It gives the first detailed account of intermezzi and opere buffe performed by Eustachio Bambini's troupe at the Paris Opéra from August 1752 to February 1754 and discusses Rameau's comedies Platée and Les Paladins and their origins.

Intellectual Development of Voltaire

Caporali, Cervantes, Sénécé, Guéret (Le Parnasse réformé), Pierre Charles Roy (Le Gott) in 1727, and Pope—to name only a few—had all composed works of this form. Voltaire was undoubtedly familiar with Sénécé and Roy, if not directly ...

Intellectual Development of Voltaire

In this comprehensive study of Voltaire's intellectual development, he provides the first full treatment of the effect of the English experience on Voltaire, the diversity of activity at Cirey, and the relation of Voltaire’s thought to 17th- and 18th-century philosophy. By devoting considerable attention to the movements, the personal relationships, and the environments that influenced Voltaire, Professor Wade is able to illuminate the sources of Voltaire’s thought and show at the same time how he wove them into a unique synthesis. A final chapter in the book contains a general summation of the importance of Voltaireanism as a philosophy of life. Originally published in 1969. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Negro in France

... to administer a beating to the poet Pierre Charles Roy (1683-1764) for writing some slurring verse on him. Roy and the Comte had been competitors for election to the Académie Française, and with no claim to merit the Comte had won.

The Negro in France

This historical study examines the black experience in Metropolitan France from the 1600s to 1960. Shelby T. McCloy explores the literary and cultural contributions of people of color to French society—from Alexandre Dumas to Rene Maran—and charts their political ascension.