Plant Pathogenesis and Resistance

The production of pathogenicity and virulence factors by the pathogen, the elicitation of defense mechanisms by the plant, and the dynamic interaction of the two are the focal points of this book.

Plant Pathogenesis and Resistance

Each plant-pathogen interaction involves a two-way molecular communication. On one hand, the pathogen perceives signals from the plant, secretes chemical arsenals to establish infection courts, and produces metabolites that disrupt structural integrity, alter cellular function, and circumvent host defenses. On the other hand, the plant senses the signals from the pathogen, reinforces its cell walls, and accumulates phytoalexins and pathogenesis-related proteins in an attempt to defend itself. The production of pathogenicity and virulence factors by the pathogen, the elicitation of defense mechanisms by the plant, and the dynamic interaction of the two are the focal points of this book. The book will be of interest to researchers and advanced undergraduate and graduate students in the areas of plant pathology, plant physiology, and plant biochemistry.

Molecular Biology in Plant Pathogenesis and Disease Management

Studies on molecular biology of pathogens, infection process and disease resistance, have provided information essentially required to understand the vulnerable stages at which the pathogens can be tackled effectively and to adopt novel ...

Molecular Biology in Plant Pathogenesis and Disease Management

Studies on molecular biology of pathogens, infection process and disease resistance, have provided information essentially required to understand the vulnerable stages at which the pathogens can be tackled effectively and to adopt novel strategies to incorporate disease resistance genes from diverse sources and /or to induce resistance of cultivars with desirable agronomic attributes using biotic or abiotic agents. The nature of interaction between the gene products of the pathogen and plant appears to determine the outcome of the interaction resulting in either disease progression or suppression. Transgenic plants with engineered genes show promise for effective exploitation of this approach for practical application. Research efforts during the recent years to sequence the whole genomes of the pathogens and plants may lead to development of better ways of manipulating disease resistance mechanisms enabling the grower to achieve higher production levels and the consumer to enjoy safer food and agricultural products. Experimental protocols included in appropriate chapters will be useful for researchers and graduate students.

Genetic and Molecular Basis of Plant Pathogenesis

The new biology is the cement this book uses to bind the literature together. Another feature of this book is an emphasis on thermodynamics.

Genetic and Molecular Basis of Plant Pathogenesis

As befits a volume in the Advanced Series in Agricultural Sciences, this book was written with problems of practical agriculture in mind. One of the ways of controlling plant disease is by using resistant cultivars; and from the wide literature of genetics and biochemistry in plant pathology I have emphasized what seems to bear most closely on breeding for disease resistance. This has a double advantage, for it happens all to the good that this emphasis is also an emphasis on primary causes of disease, as distinct from subsequent processes of symptom expression and other secondary effects. The chapters are entirely modern in outlook. The great revolution in biology this century had its high moments in the elucidation of the DNA double helix in 1953 and the deciphering of the genetic code in 1961. This book, so far as I know, is the first in plant pathology to be conceived within the framework of this new biology. Half the book could not have been written 20 years ago, even if there had then been available all the literature that has since accumulated on the genetics and chemistry of plant disease. The new biology is the cement this book uses to bind the literature together. Another feature of this book is an emphasis on thermodynamics.

Multigenic and Induced Systemic Resistance in Plants

Single gene resistance is one type of resistance which has been extensively studied by many research groups all around the world using biotechnological methodologies that have been the subject of many books and journal articles; therefore, ...

Multigenic and Induced Systemic Resistance in Plants

Plants have developed very sophisticated mechanisms to combat pathogens and pestsusingtheleastamountofreservedorgeneratedenergypossible. Theydothis by activating major defense mechanisms after recognition of the organisms that are considered to be detrimental to their survival; therefore they have been able to exist on Earth longer than any other higher organisms. It has been known for the past century that plants carry genetic information for inherited resistance against many pathogenic organisms including fungi, bacteria, and viruses, and that the relationship between pathogenic organisms and hosts plants are rather complex and in some cases time dependent. This genetic information has been the basis for breeding for resistance that has been employed by plant breeders to develop better-yielding disease resistant varieties, some of which are still being cultivated. Single gene resistance is one type of resistance which has been extensively studied by many research groups all around the world using biotechnological methodologies that have been the subject of many books and journal articles; therefore, it is beyond the scope of this book. This type of resistance is very effective, although it can be overcome by the pressure of pathogenic organisms since it depends on interaction of a single elicitor molecule from the pathogen with a single receptor site in the host.

Molecular Biology in Plant Pathogenesis and Disease Management

Investigations on various aspects of plant-pathogen interactions have the ultimate aim of providing information that may be useful for the development of effective crop disease management systems.

Molecular Biology in Plant Pathogenesis and Disease Management

Investigations on various aspects of plant-pathogen interactions have the ultimate aim of providing information that may be useful for the development of effective crop disease management systems. Molecular techniques have accelerated the formulation of short- and long-term strategies of disease management. Exclusion and eradication of plant pathogens by rapid and precise detection and identification of microbial pathogens in symptomatic and asymptomatic plants and planting materials by employing molecular methods has been practiced extensively by quarantines and certification programs with a decisive advantage. Identification of sources of resistance genes, cloning and characterization of desired resistance genes and incorporation of resistance gene(s) into cultivars and transformation of plants with selected gene(s) have been successfully performed by applying appropriate molecular techniques. Induction of resistance in susceptible cultivars by using biotic and abiotic inducers of resistance is a practical proposition for several crops whose resistance levels could not be improved by breeding or transformation procedures. The risks of emergence of pathogen strains less sensitive or resistant to chemicals have been reduced appreciably by rapid identification of resistant strains and monitoring the occurrence of such strains in different geographical locations.

Plant Pathology

This fifth edition of the classic textbook in plant pathology outlines how to recognize, treat, and prevent plant diseases.

Plant Pathology

This fifth edition of the classic textbook in plant pathology outlines how to recognize, treat, and prevent plant diseases. It provides extensive coverage of abiotic, fungal, viral, bacterial, nematode and other plant diseases and their associated epidemiology. It also covers the genetics of resistance and modern management on plant disease. Plant Pathology, Fifth Edition, is the most comprehensive resource and textbook that professionals, faculty and students can consult for well-organized, essential information. This thoroughly revised edition is 45% larger, covering new discoveries and developments in plant pathology and enhanced by hundreds of new color photographs and illustrations. The latest information on molecular techniques and biological control in plant diseases Comprehensive in coverage Numerous excellent diagrams and photographs A large variety of disease examples for instructors to choose for their course

Biotechnology and Plant Protection

This volume emphasizes recent research developments in the field of plant viral pathogenesis and disease resistance, focusing on the underlying molecular biology as well as the application of recent advances to agricultural problems.

Biotechnology and Plant Protection

This volume emphasizes recent research developments in the field of plant viral pathogenesis and disease resistance, focusing on the underlying molecular biology as well as the application of recent advances to agricultural problems. Each of the following general topics is covered by four or five chapters: genome replication and expression, subviral RNA's, virus/host interactions, and expression of viral genes in transformed plants. Contents:Disassembly Mechanisms of Plant RNA Viruses: Fine-Tuning and Possible Sites for Transgenic Protection (T M A Wilson)Expression, Processing, and Transport of Tobacco Etch Potyviral Proteins (J C Carrington et al.)Properties of Genes Influencing Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus Movement Phenotypes (R G K Donald et al.)Figwort Mosaic Virus, A Caulimovirus, Regulates the Expression of Its Genes via Transactivation of a Polycistronic mRNA (S Gowda et al.)Self-Cleavage and Replication of Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus Satellite RNA (S L Silver et al.)Precise Interactions between Tobamoviruses and Plants (W O Dawson et al.)A “Gene for Gene” Interaction and Potato Virus X (D C Baulcombe et al.)and other papers Readership: Molecular biologists, plant pathologists and virologists. keywords:

Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology

The book has ‘Plant Pathology’ as a special paper in Botany and some chapters most relevant to ‘Plant Biotechnology’. The book also serves as a good reference and a text book for PG students and research scholars.

Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology

The book has 17 chapters dealing with recent developments in physiological and molecular plant pathology: the entry and establishment of pathogen, physiological disorders during the infection, mechanism of multiplication of the pathogens in the host and destabilization of the biochemical machinery of the host. The book deciphers the response and reactions of the host plant at molecular level. The chapter on ‘Mechanism of Disease Resistance’ explores its genetic basis, providing an insight into the breeding plants for disease resistance. The chapter entitled ‘Plant Pathology, Society, Ethics and Environment’ deals with all round views of applied plant pathology, issues of food safety and the role of plant pathology, bioterrorism, agroterrorism, biological warfare, etc. Four chapters comprehensively deal on latest molecular research work on: different approaches to unravel the mechanism of plant pathogenesis. The book (perhaps first such contribution) containing comprehensive text may be widely welcomed. Topics dealt in the book are relevant to the PG course content approved by ICAR in Plant Pathology and adopted in all the State Agricultural Universities (SAUs). The book has ‘Plant Pathology’ as a special paper in Botany and some chapters most relevant to ‘Plant Biotechnology’. The book also serves as a good reference and a text book for PG students and research scholars.

Plant pathogen Interactions

Understanding plant-pathogen interactions is critical to maintaining and improving the health of crops. This is particularly true in light of future pressures on agricultural systems.

Plant pathogen Interactions

Humans rely on plants for food, fiber, fuel and medicines. Understanding plant-pathogen interactions is critical to maintaining and improving the health of crops. This is particularly true in light of future pressures on agricultural systems. Broadly, plant-pathogen interactions can be viewed through three lenses: microbial pathogenesis, plant immunity, and crosstalk between pathogenesis and resistance. This work consists of three studies, each focused through one of these three lenses. The first addresses a possible role for microbial production of the small molecule salicylic acid in crosstalk signaling. The second investigates the mechanism of microbial iron acquisition from host plant tissues. The third characterizes the effects of the immune regulatory phytohormone salicylic acid in root tissues, an area that was previously largely unexplored. Together, these three studies contribute new knowledge to our understanding of plant-pathogen interactions and new tools for future investigations. Salicylic acid (SA, 2-hydroxybenzoic acid) is a small molecule with numerous known bioactivities in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans to plants. In plants the compound is considered a phytohormone because it acts at low concentrations to signal a major reprogramming of cellular activities and does so both locally and at sites distal from the site of synthesis. The best-characterized outcome of SA signaling is an activation of a plant innate immune response effective against numerous biotrophic pathogens. One such pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 infects Lycopersicon esculentum and Arabidopsis thaliana hosts and is predicted to synthesize SA as an intermediate for yersiniabactin (Ybt) biosynthesis. As a siderophore, Ybt is expected to function in high affinity iron acquisition, and several studies indicated that siderophore function is required for pathogenesis of microbial and fungal phytopathogens. Thus, if Ybt is synthesized for iron acquisition in planta, then active synthesis of SA by DC3000 may impact pathogenesis. Alternatively, plant SA could be sequestered by DC3000 through conversion to Ybt, thereby reducing host immunity. Indeed, SA is produced by DC3000 for Ybt synthesis under iron limited culture conditions (Chapter 2). However, results from a genetic approach described in Chapter 2 demonstrate that SA and Ybt from DC3000 are unlikely to play a significant role in pathogenesis. Although iron acquisition through siderophores is well established as a key virulence determinant in many mammalian pathosystems, fewer examples exist for plant pathogens. As mentioned above, the Ybt siderophore is unlikely to play a role in DC3000 pathogenesis (Chapter 2). However, DC3000 has two predicted siderophore systems for high affinity iron uptake, Ybt and pyoverdin (Pvd), raising the possibility that Pvd production is sufficient for iron acquisition from plant hosts. Therefore, we continued with a genetic investigation into DC3000 siderophores in order to determine mechanism of pathogenic iron nutrition (described in Chapter 3). Results from this approach show that loss of both siderophores did not reduce pathogenesis, but also revealed the presence of a third DC3000 siderophore, citrate. However, despite the importance of iron-citrate uptake in iron limited culture, a triple DC3000 mutant lacking all three siderophores was no less pathogenic than wt DC3000. Further experiments combined with data from others lead to a questioning of the necessity for high affinity iron uptake in plant pathogenesis, and suggest that low affinity iron uptake is sufficient for growth in planta. The finding that DC3000 siderophores are not virulence factors and the view of the plant intercellular environment as iron replete, rather than iron-limited, changes our understanding of iron physiology for DC3000 and iron relations in plant-pathogen interactions in general. Experiments described in Chapter 4 show that physiologically relevant concentrations of SA inhibit root growth in Arabidopsis primarily through a dramatic reduction in cell elongation. We could not demonstrate that this SA treatment alters auxin signaling in the root, but we do demonstrate that SA reduces root accumulation of the hydroxyl radical and other reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (Chapter 4). Interestingly, the canonical NPR1 mediated SA immune response is not required for the inhibition of root growth. In fact, an npr1 mutant is more sensitive to SA (Chapter 4). A further screening of known defense mutants revealed a role for SA responsive transcription factor WRKY38 and paralog WRKY62 in modulating SA root inhibition. The wrky38wrky62 double mutant is more resistant to SA root inhibition and WRKY38 overexpressor mutants are more sensitive (Chapter 4). Intriguingly, WRKY38 is expressed in root tips without exogenous SA application, suggesting a possible role for endogenous SA in regulating root development. Together, the results from this investigation provide first insights into the little understood root inhibition activity of SA, and establish this tractable system for future investigations into cellular targets of SA action.

Plant Pathogenesis and Disease Control

The book will be an essential reference for phytopathologists, plant biochemists, pesticide chemists, mycologists, plant cell technologists, and agricultural researchers.

Plant Pathogenesis and Disease Control

Environmental pollution resulting from widespread pesticide application has become a serious worldwide problem. Plant Pathogenesis and Disease Control is an important new reference that addresses this problem by exploring the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of plant pathogenesis and emphasizing the use of "pest control agents" rather than "pesticides" for plant disease control. Topics examined include pathogenicity, the resistance of plants against pathogens, the offensive and defensive struggle between hosts and parasites, methods for using natural defense mechanisms to develop environmentally sound disease control agents, and the use of modern biotechnology for plant disease control. The book will be an essential reference for phytopathologists, plant biochemists, pesticide chemists, mycologists, plant cell technologists, and agricultural researchers.

Viral Genes and Plant Pathogenesis

The chapters in this book represent detailed versions of papers presented at the Symposium on Viral Genes and Plant Pathogenesis held at Lexington, Kentucky on October 16 and 17, 1989.

Viral Genes and Plant Pathogenesis

The chapters in this book represent detailed versions of papers presented at the Symposium on Viral Genes and Plant Pathogenesis held at Lexington, Kentucky on October 16 and 17, 1989. In selecting topics and authors, we attempted to have represented a spectrum of systems which are at the forefront of research on plant virus genes and gene products, particularly as they relate to plant disease. The book also contains pertinent discussion of the papers presented at the symposium, as well as summaries, observations and projections of future research directions prepared by the session chairmen. We wish to express our appreciation to Dr. D. L. Davis, of the RI. Reynolds Tobacco Company for suggesting the organization of the Symposium and the publication of the proceedings, and to the R 1. Reynolds Tobacco Company for the financial support which made the symposium possible. We also wish to thank those of our colleagues in the Department of Plant Pathology, University of Kentucky, who very ably and in many ways contributed to the organization and conduct of the conference. Thomas P. Pirone lohnG. Shaw v Contents Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi INDUCTION OF HOST GENES BY THE HYPERSENSITIVE RESPONSE OF TOBACCO TO VIRUS INFECTION J. F. Bol, C. M. A. van Rossum, Bl. C. Cornelissen and H. J. M. Linthorst . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . l COAT PROTEIN MEDIATED RESISTANCE IN TRANSGENIC PLANTS Roger N. Beachy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONS OF TOBACCO MOSAIC VIRUS RNA Yoshimi Okada, Tetsuo Meshi, and Yuichiro Watanabe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Induced Resistance to Disease in Plants

Induced Resistance to Disease in Plants addresses the biology of induced resistance in legumes, solanaceae, cucurbits and monocots, since these are the families that have received the most attention, followed by a discussion of the ...

Induced Resistance to Disease in Plants

Induced or acquired resistance to disease in plants has been known for many years, but the phenomenon was studied in only a few laboratories until about a decade ago. Since then, there has been an increasing interest in induced resistance as a new, environmentally safe means of disease control, as well as a model for the study of the genes involved in host defence and the signals that control them. This increased interest led the editors of Induced Resistance to Disease in Plants to collect and summarise much of the current and older literature on the topic in a single volume. Each chapter covers its topic as comprehensively as possible, thus serving as a solid introduction to the literature, as well as expressing its writer's own views on the state of research in the area and giving an indication of where future research may lead. Induced Resistance to Disease in Plants addresses the biology of induced resistance in legumes, solanaceae, cucurbits and monocots, since these are the families that have received the most attention, followed by a discussion of the molecular basis of induced resistance, its genetic and evolutionary significance, and practical applications in disease control. The book will provide a background for those commencing work in the area, as well as a source of information for established workers who wish to learn about other areas of induced resistance.

Physiology and Biochemistry of Plant Pathogen Interactions

There has been a significant surge of interest in the study of the physiology and biochemistry of plant host-parasite interactions in recent years, as evidenced by the number of research papers currently being published on the subject.

Physiology and Biochemistry of Plant Pathogen Interactions

There has been a significant surge of interest in the study of the physiology and biochemistry of plant host-parasite interactions in recent years, as evidenced by the number of research papers currently being published on the subject. The in creased interest is probably based on the evidence that effective management of many plant diseases is, for the most part, contingent upon a clear understanding of the nature of host-parasite interactions. This intensified research effort calls for a greater number of books, such as this one, designed to compile, synthesize, and evaluate widely scattered pieces of information on this subject. The study of host-parasite interactions concerns the struggle between plants and pathogens, which has been incessant throughout their coevolution. Such in teractions are often highly complex. Pathogens have developed sophisticated of fensive systems to parasitize plants, while plants have evolved diversified defen sive strategies to ward off potential pathogens. In certain cases, the outcome of a specific host-parasite interaction seems to depend upon the presence or efficacy of the plant's defense system. A plant may become diseased when a parasite manages to invade it, unhindered by preexisting defense systems and/or without eliciting the plant's induced resistance response(s). Absence of disease may re flect the inability of the invading pathogen to overcome the plant's defense sys tem(s).

Molecular Aspects of Plant Pathogen Interaction

Providing a comprehensive picture of plant-pathogen interaction, the updated information included in this book is valuable for all those involved in crop improvement. The book offers an integrated overview of plant–pathogen interactions.

Molecular Aspects of Plant Pathogen Interaction

The book offers an integrated overview of plant–pathogen interactions. It discusses all the steps in the pathway, from the microbe–host-cell interface and the plant’s recognition of the microbe to the plant’s defense response and biochemical alterations to achieve tolerance / resistance. It also sheds light on the classes of pathogens (bacteria, fungus and viruses); effector molecules, such as PAMPs; receptor molecules like PRRs and NBS-LRR proteins; signaling components like MAPKs; regulatory molecules, such as phytohormones and miRNA; transcription factors, such as WRKY; defense-related proteins such as PR-proteins; and defensive metabolites like secondary metabolites. In addition, it examines the role of post-genomics, high-throughput technology (transcriptomics and proteomics) in studying pathogen outbreaks causing crop losses in a number of plants. Providing a comprehensive picture of plant-pathogen interaction, the updated information included in this book is valuable for all those involved in crop improvement.

Plant Hormone Signaling Systems in Plant Innate Immunity

These features and more make this book the most up to date resource in the most fascinating field of ‘Signals and Signaling Systems in Plant Innate Immunity’.

Plant Hormone Signaling Systems in Plant Innate Immunity

Plants are endowed with innate immune system, which acts as a surveillance system against possible attack by pathogens. Plant innate immune systems have high potential to fight against viral, bacterial, oomycete and fungal pathogens and protect the crop plants against wide range of diseases. However, the innate immune system is a sleeping system in unstressed healthy plants. Fast and strong activation of the plant immune responses aids the host plants to win the war against the pathogens. Plant hormone signaling systems including salicylate (SA), jasmonate (JA), ethylene (ET), abscisic acid (ABA), auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins and brassinosteroids signaling systems play a key role in activation of the sleeping immune systems. Suppression or induction of specific hormone signaling systems may result in disease development or disease resistance. Specific signaling pathway has to be activated to confer resistance against specific pathogen in a particular host. Two forms of induced resistance, systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and induced systemic resistance (ISR), have been recognized based on the induction of specific hormone signaling systems. Specific hormone signaling system determines the outcome of plant-pathogen interactions, culminating in disease development or disease resistance. Susceptibility or resistance against a particular pathogen is determined by the action of the signaling network. The disease outcome is often determined by complex network of interactions among multiple hormone signaling pathways. Manipulation of the complex hormone signaling systems and fine tuning the hormone signaling events would help in management of various crop diseases. The purpose of the book is to critically examine the potential methods to manipulate the multiple plant hormone signaling systems to aid the host plants to win the battle against pathogens.

PAMP Signals in Plant Innate Immunity

This book describes the most fascinating PAMP-PRR signaling complex and signal transduction systems.

PAMP Signals in Plant Innate Immunity

Plant innate immunity is a potential surveillance system of plants and is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. The immune system is a sleeping system in unstressed healthy plants and is activated on perception of the pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP; the pathogen’s signature) of invading pathogens. The PAMP alarm/danger signals are perceived by plant pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs). The plant immune system uses several second messengers to encode information generated by the PAMPs and deliver the information downstream of PRRs to proteins which decode/interpret signals and initiate defense gene expression. This book describes the most fascinating PAMP-PRR signaling complex and signal transduction systems. It also discusses the highly complex networks of signaling pathways involved in transmission of the signals to induce distinctly different defense-related genes to mount offence against pathogens.

Molecular Biology in Plant Pathogenesis and Disease Management

This volume focuses on the possibility of applying the knowledge on pathogenesis and molecular epidemiology to determine the vulnerable stages in the life cycles of the pathogens that can be disrupted to achieve more effective disease ...

Molecular Biology in Plant Pathogenesis and Disease Management

Studies on the phenomenon of plant pathogenesis (disease development) have been useful to have a deep insight into the interactions between host plant and the pathogen. Depending on the levels of susceptibility (compatibility) or resistance (incompatibility) of the host plant and virulence of the pathogen, disease development may progress, either leading to symptom expression or result in the suppression of pathogen proliferation. Molecular techniques have been applied to elucidate the nature of interactions between the gene products of the plant and pathogen at cellular and molecular levels. Successful evasion of host’s surveillance system and subsequent activities of metabolites of the pathogen (enzymes and toxins) encoded by pathogen genes counteracting the effects of various defense-related antimicrobial compounds present already or produced by the host plants, after initiation of infection have been critically studied by applying various molecular techniques. In addition to studying various phases of disease development in individual plants, molecular methods have been demonstrated to be effective, in gathering data on various aspects of epidemiology under natural conditions where the interaction of pathogen with populations of plants is influenced significantly by the environmental conditions existing in different ecosystems. This volume focuses on the possibility of applying the knowledge on pathogenesis and molecular epidemiology to determine the vulnerable stages in the life cycles of the pathogens that can be disrupted to achieve more effective disease control.

Switching on Plant Innate Immunity Signaling Systems

This book presents the ways and means to switch on plant immune signaling systems using PAMP-PIMP-PRR signaling complex for crop disease management.

Switching on Plant Innate Immunity Signaling Systems

This book presents the ways and means to switch on plant immune signaling systems using PAMP-PIMP-PRR signaling complex for crop disease management. It also describes bioengineering approaches to develop transgenic plants expressing enhanced disease resistance using genes encoding PAMPs, PRRs and transcription factors and genes involved in generation of PIMPs/HAMPs. It also discusses recent commercial development of PAMP products to switch on plant innate immunity for crop disease management. These unique approaches have been described with more than 100 figures and illustrations and these would make this book attractive for researchers and students to buy this book.