Knowledge and Language

Volume III: Metaphor and Knowledge F. R. Ankersmit. of metaphorical descriptions . But precisely when within ... Quite naturally , Levin associates this kind of poetic truth or knowledge with the realm of Kantian aesthetic judgment .

Knowledge and Language


The Light of Knowledge

Instead of building an embodied poetic knowledge, it followed a progression beginning with the word as vehicle of reference, moving to a graphic representation of the alphasyllable, ending with a depoeticized oral rendition: [படடா] ...

The Light of Knowledge

Since the early 1990s hundreds of thousands of Tamil villagers in southern India have participated in literacy lessons, science demonstrations, and other events designed to transform them into active citizens with access to state power. These efforts to spread enlightenment among the oppressed are part of a movement known as the Arivoli Iyakkam (the Enlightenment Movement), considered to be among the most successful mass literacy movements in recent history. In The Light of Knowledge, Francis Cody’s ethnography of the Arivoli Iyakkam highlights the paradoxes inherent in such movements that seek to emancipate people through literacy when literacy is a power-laden social practice in its own right. The Light of Knowledge is set primarily in the rural district of Pudukkottai in Tamil Nadu, and it is about activism among laboring women from marginalized castes who have been particularly active as learners and volunteers in the movement. In their endeavors to remake the Tamil countryside through literacy activism, workers in the movement found that their own understanding of the politics of writing and Enlightenment was often transformed as they encountered vastly different notions of language and imaginations of social order. Indeed, while activists of the movement successfully mobilized large numbers of rural women, they did so through logics that often pushed against the very Enlightenment rationality they hoped to foster. Offering a rare behind-the-scenes look at an increasingly important area of social and political activism, The Light of Knowledge brings tools of linguistic anthropology to engage with critical social theories of the postcolonial state.

Sensuous Knowledge

This is why black feminism offers a relevant countercultural approach against the knowledge system that governs our world ... by relying on the in-depth, intuitive, and poetic knowledge of creative expression not only Sensuous Knowledge 25.

Sensuous Knowledge

In Sensuous Knowledge, Minna Salami draws on Africa-centric, feminist-first and artistic traditions to help us rediscover inclusive and invigorating ways of experiencing the world afresh. Combining the playfulness of a storyteller with the insight of a social critic, the book pries apart the systems of power and privilege that have dominated ways of thinking for centuries – and which have led to so much division, prejudice and damage. And it puts forward a new, sensuous, approach to knowledge: one grounded in a host of global perspectives – from Black Feminism to personal narrative, pop culture to high art, Western philosophy to African mythology – together comprising a vision of hope for a fragmented world riven by crisis. Through the prism of this new knowledge, Salami offers fresh insights into the key cultural issues that affect women's lives. How are we to view Sisterhood, Motherhood or even Womanhood itself? What is Power and why do we conceive of Beauty? How does one achieve Liberation? She asks women to break free of the prison made by ingrained male-centric biases, and build a house themselves – a home that can nurture us all. Sensuous Knowledge confirms Minna Salami as one the most important spokespeople of today, and the arrival of a blistering new literary voice.

Higher Education and the Growth of Knowledge

technical knowledge), which seeks moral perfection and includes ethics and politics. Aristotle did not consider history a science because it is not universal but only of the particular. 3. Lastly, poetic knowledge (“poiesis” is the ...

Higher Education and the Growth of Knowledge

This book sketches the history of higher education, in parallel with the development of science. Its goal is to draw attention to the historical tensions between the aims of higher education and those of science, in the hope of contributing to improving the contemporary university. A helpful tool in analyzing these intellectual and social tensions is Karl Popper's philosophy of science demarcating science and its social context. Popper defines a society that encourages criticism as "open," and argues convincingly that an open society is the most appropriate one for the growth of science. A "closed society," on the other hand, is a tribal and dogmatic society. Despite being the universal home of science today, the university, as an institution that is thousands of years old, carries traces of different past cultural, social, and educational traditions. The book argues that, by and large, the university was, and still is, a closed society and does not serve the best interests of the development of science and of students' education.

Ignorance

61 Michael Wood – who opens his book on literature and knowledge with a brief consideration of this poem – comments ... the poem's absolute business is an unconceding pursuit of poetic insight and poetic knowledge' (GT 163; see also pp.

Ignorance

Andrew Bennett argues in this fascinating book that ignorance is part of the narrative and poetic force of literature and is an important aspect of its thematic focus: ignorance is what literary texts are about. He sees that the dominant conception of literature since the Romantic period involves an often unacknowledged engagement with the experience of not knowing. From Wordsworth and Keats to George Eliot and Charles Dickens, from Henry James to Joseph Conrad, from Elizabeth Bowen to Philip Roth and Seamus Heaney, writers have been fascinated and compelled by the question of ignorance, including their own. Bennett argues that there is a politics and ethics as well as a poetics of ignorance: literature’s agnoiology, its acknowledgement of the limits of what we know both of ourselves and of others, engages with the possibility of democracy and the ethical, and allows us to begin to conceive of what it might mean to be human. This exciting approach to literary theory will be of interest to lecturers and students of literary theory and criticism.

Record of Daily Knowledge and Collected Poems and Essays

In a further section, some general consideration is given to astronomy—that is, the development of the science and how, in ancient times, it formed part of the general body of knowledge rather than being an area of special expertise, ...

Record of Daily Knowledge and Collected Poems and Essays

Gu Yanwu pioneered the late-Ming and early Qing-era practice of Han Learning, or Evidential Learning, favoring practical over theoretical approaches to knowledge. He strongly encouraged scholars to return to the simple, ethical precepts of early Confucianism, and in his best-known work, Rizhi lu (Record of Daily Knowledge), he applied this paradigm to literature, government, economics, history, education, and philology. This volume includes translations of selected essays from Rizhi lu and Gu Yanwu's Shiwen Ji (Collected Poems and Essays), along with an introduction explaining the personal and political dimensions of the scholar's work. Gu Yanwu wrote the essays and poems featured in this volume while traveling across China during the decades immediately after the fall of the Ming Dynasty. They merge personal observation with rich articulations of Confucian principles and are, as Gu said, "not old coin but copper dug from the hills." Like many of his contemporaries, Gu Yanwu believed the Ming Dynasty had suffered from an overconcentration of power in its central government and recommended decentralizing authority while strengthening provincial self-government. In his introduction, Ian Johnston recounts Gu Yanwu's personal history and reviews his published works, along with their scholarly reception. Annotations accompany his translations, and a special essay on feudalism by Tang Dynasty poet and scholar Liu Zongyuan (773–819) provides insight into Gu Yanwu's later work on the subject.

Young Knowledge the Poems of Robin Hyde

... leave from the University allowed me to continue with research and preparation of the poems for publication. ... Staff at the following institutions have been involved at various points and I am grateful for their expertise and ...

Young Knowledge  the Poems of Robin Hyde

Young Knowledge presents for the first time a full chronological record of the poems of Robin Hyde, a New Zealand writer active in the 1930s whose full achievement is only now being recognised. Drawing on the 500 poems extant Michele Leggott has chosen 300 divided into five sections. Her aim is to arrive at a better understanding of the 15 years of massive production which shaped the poet and which may be her major literary work. Young Knowledge shows Robin Hyde's growth as a poet, her response to the painful events of her life and to the political and social world around her. The poems are remarkable both for their acute observation of the physical and emotional world and for their powerful prophetic and visionary elements. The introduction and notes to Young Knowledge (available here: www.nzepc.auckland.ac.nz/authors/hyde) make this an authoritative and comprehensive text and a brilliant presentation of a great poet. An extra pleasure is the inclusion of five stunning photographs of Robin Hyde, used on the cover and to head each section, which have not previously been known.

Magic

Aimé Césaire Poetry and Knowledge // 1945 Poetic knowledge is born in the great silence of scientific knowledge . Through reflection , observation and experience , man finally dominates the facts that bewilder him .

Magic

The first accessible reader on magic’s generative relationship with contemporary art practice. From the hexing of presidents to a renewed interest in herbalism and atavistic forms of self-care, magic has furnished the contemporary imagination with mysterious and often disorienting bodies of arcane thought and practice. This volume brings together writings by artists, magicians, historians, and theorists that illuminate the vibrant correspondences animating contemporary art’s varied encounters with magical culture, inspiring a reconsideration of the relationship between the symbolic and the pragmatic. Dispensing with simple narratives of reenchantment, Magic illustrates the intricate ways in which we have to some extent always been captivated by the allure of the numinous. It demonstrates how magical culture’s tendencies toward secrecy, occlusion, and encryption might provide contemporary artists with strategies of remedial communality, a renewed faith in the invocational power of personal testimony, and a poetics of practice that could boldly question our political circumstances, from the crisis of climate collapse to the strictures of socially sanctioned techniques of medical and psychiatric care. Tracing its various emergences through the shadows of modernity, the circuitries of ritual media, and declarations of psychic self-defence, Magic deciphers the evolution of a “magical-critical” thinking that productively complicates, contradicts and expands the boundaries of our increasingly weird present.

Astronomical Knowledge Transmission Through Illustrated Aratea Manuscripts

Aratus claims to have no special knowledge, but his poem provides a summary of the entire celestial phenomena as it was understood by Greek astronomers in the third-century BCE. Because Aratus lacked the expertise of a practiced ...

Astronomical Knowledge Transmission Through Illustrated Aratea Manuscripts

This carefully researched monograph is a historical investigation of the illustrated Aratea astronomical manuscript and its many interpretations over the centuries. Aratus' 270 B.C.E. Greek poem describing the constellations and astrological phenomena was translated and copied over 800 years into illuminated manuscripts that preserved and illustrated these ancient stories about the constellations. The Aratea survives in its entirety due to multiple translations from Greek to Latin and even to Arabic, with many illuminated versions being commissioned over the ages. The survey encompasses four interrelated disciplines: history of literature, history of myth, history of science, and history of art. Aratea manuscripts by their nature are a meeting place of these distinct branches, and the culling of information from historical literature and from the manuscripts themselves focuses on a wider, holistic view; a narrow approach could not provide a proper prospective. What is most essential to know about this work is that because of its successive incarnations it has survived and been reinterpreted through the centuries, which speaks to its importance in all of these disciplines. This book brings a better understanding of the history, changes and transmission of the original astronomical Phaenomena poem. Historians, art historians, astronomy lovers, and historians of astronomy will learn more specialized details concerning the Aratea and how the tradition survived from the Middle Ages. It is a credit to the poetry of Aratus and the later interpreters of the text that its pagan aspects were not edited nor removed, but respected and maintained in the exact same form despite the fact that all sixty Aratea manuscripts mentioned in this study were produced under the rule of Christianity.

Being and Predication

None of this takes us to the center of Maritain's contention that poetic knowledge involves affective connaturality. But it is the way to the center. The morally good use of the capacity the virtue of art provides is extrinsic to art as ...

Being and Predication

Brings together articles that influenced the scholarly work of Ralph McInerny.

The Poems and Prose Remains of Arthur Hugh Clough

For poetry , like science , has its final precision ; and there are expressions of poetic knowledge which can no more be rewritten than could the elements of geometry . There are pieces of poetic language which , try as men will ...

The Poems and Prose Remains of Arthur Hugh Clough


Journeys in Caribbean Thought

As we have already seen it is through the prism of poetics that Wynter approaches the transcendental domain. ... of producing poetic knowledge rather than those of producing scientific, logical, moral or mathematical knowledge.

Journeys in Caribbean Thought

For the past 30 years, Paget Henry has been one of the most articulate and creative voices in Caribbean scholarship, making seminal contributions to the study of Caribbean political economy, C.L.R. James studies, critical theory, phenomenology, and Africana philosophy. This volume includes some of his most important essays from across his remarkable career, providing an introduction to a broad range of pressing contemporary themes and to the unique mind of one of the leading Caribbean intellectuals of his generation.

Aesthetic Perception

Poetic intuition 53 Artistic creativity and knowledge through connaturality 54 Poetic intuition as cognitive 57 Conclusion 59 5: KNOWLEDGE THROUGH INCLINATION 60 The twofold manner of judging in the Summa Theologiae 60 The notion of ...

Aesthetic Perception

In his seminal work, "Truth and Method", Hans-Goerg Gadamer highlighted the misguided supposition of the Enlightenment that such a thing as 'pure reason' actually exists. The notion that 'prejudice' informs all understanding is not however a novel one in the history of Western thought; this idea is to be found in the work of Aquinas, albeit in an implicit manner. In this book the implications of this idea for a Thomistic approach to the problematic of aesthetic perception are examined. Beginning with Thomas' famous definition of beautiful things as 'those things which when seen give pleasure', the author highlights the limitations present in previous treatments of Thomas' embryonic aesthetic theory and shows how insights gleaned from Thomas' virtue ethics can contribute to a Thomistic aesthetic theory, a theory which has relevance for both philosophy and theology.

The Common Things

He says here that the end of creative intuition is the work made , the poem , the picture , or the symphony , “ which plays the role of the judgment in speculative knowledge . ” 14 So while we understand the activities of the creative ...

The Common Things

Concerned with the trendy, technocratic, and at times sophistical character of contemporary education at all levels, both public and private, the authors of this collection seek to reinvigorate a Thomistic approach to education appropriate to the problems of our day. With its main inspiration taken from the work of Jacques Maritain, especially his 1943 Education at the Crossroads, the volume presents a trenchant critique of the "privacies" of contemporary education, with its emphasis upon the conventional and useful. At the same time, the essays present the outlines of the proper alternative, an education which helps students draw out from themselves the desire for truths which transcend the contingencies of culture and utility. Such an education seeks to guide students to "the common things" available to all human beings. The essays uphold an account of man's intellectual and affective capacities which understands these capacities as naturally ordered to truth. The essays approach the task in different but complementary ways: in critiques of contemporary theories of education, in speculative accounts of knowledge and learning, in applications of theory to specific institutional settings, and in discussions of the political contexts governing modern education. In this rich variety of ways, the essays in The Common Things not only point the way back to the crossroads Maritain spoke of fifty years ago; they go on to indicate something of the landscape along the road not taken by contemporary education. ABOUT THE EDITOR: Daniel McInerny is assistant professor of philosophy at the University of St. Thomas/Center for Thomistic Studies in Houston, Texas. THE CONTRIBUTORS: In addition to the editor, the contributors to the volume are: Benedict M. Ashley, O.P., Romanus Cessario, O.P., Charles Dechert, Donald DeMarco, Curtis L. Hancock, Gregory J. Kerr, Joseph W. Koterski, S.J., Robert Lauder, Herbert I. London, Robert J. McLaughlin, Daniel McInerny, John M. Palms, Jerome Meric Pessagno, Ernest S. Pierucci, Alice Ramos, Mario Ramos-Reyes, Walter Raubicheck, Peter A. Redpath, Gregory M. Reichberg, James V. Schall, S.J., Francis Slade, Michael W. Strasser, and Henk E. S. Woldring. PRAISE FOR THE BOOK: "These essays are a considerable addition to Thomistic thought about education."--Review of Metaphysics

On the Literature and Thought of the German Classical Era

He does so in his Philosophie der Kunst of 1802–03, in the section on the didactic poem.56 His argument is complicated, but it runs in essence as follows. The didactic poem, which has a specific end, namely to impart knowledge, ...

On the Literature and Thought of the German Classical Era

This volume provides a valuable contribution to our knowledge of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century intellectual life inside and outside Germany. —Prof. Karl S. Guthke, Harvard University This elegant collection of essays ranges across eighteenth and nineteenth-century thought, covering philosophy, science, literature and religion in the ‘Age of Goethe.’ A recognised authority in the field, Nisbet grapples with the major voices of the Enlightenment and gives pride of place to the figures of Lessing, Herder, Goethe and Schiller. These eleven essays range widely in their compass of thought and intellectual discourse, dealing incisively with themes including the philosophical implications of literature and the relationship between religion, science and politics. The result is an accomplished reflection on German thought, but also on its rebirth, as Nisbet argues for the relevance of these Enlightenment thinkers for the readers of today. The first half of this collection focuses predominantly on eighteenth-century thought, where names like Lessing, Goethe and Herder, but also Locke and Voltaire, feature. The second has a wider chronological scope, discussing authors such as Winckelmann and Schiller, while branching out from discussions of religion, philosophy and literature to explore the sciences. Issues of biology, early environmentalism, and natural history also form part of this volume. The collection concludes with an examination of changing attitudes towards art in the aftermath of the ‘Age of Goethe.’ The essays in this volume have been previously published separately, but are brought together in this collection to present Nisbet’s widely-acclaimed perspectives on this fascinating period of German thought. It will be of interest to scholars and students of the intellectual life of Europe during the Enlightenment, while its engaging and lucid style will also appeal to the general reader.

Poetic Knowledge

Poetic Knowledge


Reading Roman Declamation

ative potential for poetic quotations , and gestures towards an unspoken rule that one should not requote somebody else ' s clever ... Fuscus reminds him he is not trained in these matters , and even outsmarts him in poetic knowledge .

Reading Roman Declamation

Situated at the crossroads of rhetoric and fiction, the genre of declamatio offers its practitioners the freedom to experiment with new forms of discourse. This volume places the literariness of Roman declamation into the spotlight by showcasing its theoretical influences, stylistic devices, and generic conventions as related by Seneca the Elder, the author of the Controversiae and Suasoriae, which jointly make up the largest surviving collection of declamatory speeches from antiquity. Authored by an international group of leading scholars of Latin literature and rhetoric, the chapters explore not only the historical roles of individual declaimers, but also the physical and linguistic techniques upon which they collectively drew. In addition, the 'dark side of declamation' is illuminated by contributions on the competitiveness of the arena and the manipulative potential of declamatory skill and, in keeping with the overall treatment of declamation as a literary phenomenon, a section has also been dedicated to intertextuality. Drawing on thought-provoking analyses of Seneca the Elder's works, the volume highlights the complexity of these texts and maps out, for the first time, the socio-cultural context for their composition, delivery, and reception, as well as providing a comprehensive, innovative, and up-to-date treatment of Roman declamation that will be essential for both students and scholars in the fields of Latin literature, Republican Roman history, and rhetoric.

Delmore Schwartz

The poem titled “Summer Knowledge” suggests that such knowledge— the kind that Socrates distinguishes from mere opinion in ... why it cannot be set forth in an already established poetic form: the composition, like the knowledge itself, ...

Delmore Schwartz

Taking as its starting point Delmore Schwartz's self-appointment as both a 'poet of the Hudson River' and 'laureate of the Atlantic,' this book comprehensively reassesses the poetic achievement of a critically neglected writer. Runchman reads Schwartz's poetry in relation to its national and international perspectives.

The Value of Literature

Martha Nussbaum, Love's Knowledge: Essays on Philosophy and Literature (New York: Oxford University Press, 1990); and Martha Nussbaum, Poetic Justice: The Literary Imagination and Public Life (Boston: Beacon Press, 1995). 26.

The Value of Literature

The Value of Literature provides an original and compelling argument for the historical and contemporary significance of literature to humanity.