Political Violence and the Struggle in South Africa

This book provides a unique perspective, at once scholarly and fully engaged, on the political violence in South Africa during 'The Time of the Comrades' in the mid-1980s.

Political Violence and the Struggle in South Africa

This book provides a unique perspective, at once scholarly and fully engaged, on the political violence in South Africa during 'The Time of the Comrades' in the mid-1980s. The work of a group of social scientists and professionals, whose own work and thinking have been profoundly affected by the political crisis of that time, it provides an in-depth research and analysis as well as critical reflections on the difficult political and theoretical issues raised by political violence and the struggle in South Africa.

Violence in Southern Africa

This volume examines the degree to which violence however defined has influenced political change across the region.

Violence in Southern Africa

Violence in southern Africa has occurred in a variety of modes including ethnic confrontation, liberation struggles and cross-border aggression and crime. This volume examines the degree to which violence however defined has influenced political change across the region. The contributions include analyses of the ramifications of violent disorder in Angola and Mozambique, the impact on the political economy of both states and the prospects for lasting peace following the end of civil war.

A Map of Political Violence in Contemporary South Africa

A Map of political violence in contemporary South Africa : Paper was presented to the conference on "Women in the Struggle for Peace" in Harare in April 1989 / Institute for a Democratic Alternative for South Africa.

A Map of Political Violence in Contemporary South Africa

A Map of political violence in contemporary South Africa : Paper was presented to the conference on "Women in the Struggle for Peace" in Harare in April 1989 / Institute for a Democratic Alternative for South Africa.

Making Peace with Your Enemy

In its comparative analysis of South Africa and Algeria, Making Peace with Your Enemy reveals a paradox.

Making Peace with Your Enemy

Reconciliation between political antagonists who went to war against each other is not a natural process. Hostility toward an enemy only slowly abates and the political resolution of a conflict is not necessarily followed by the immediate pacification of society and reconciliation among individuals. Under what conditions can a combatant be brought to understand the motivations of his enemies, consider them as equals, and develop a new relationship, going so far as to even forgive them? By comparing the experiences of veterans of the South African and Franco-Algerian conflicts, Laetitia Bucaille seeks to answer this question. She begins by putting the postconflict and postcolonial order that characterizes South Africa, France, and Algeria into perspective, examining how each country provided symbolic and material rewards to the veterans and how past conflict continues to shape the present. Exploring the narratives of ex-combatants, Bucaille also fosters an understanding of their intimate experiences as well as their emotions of pride, loss, and guilt. In its comparative analysis of South Africa and Algeria, Making Peace with Your Enemy reveals a paradox. In Algeria, the rhetoric of the regime is characterized by resentment toward colonizing France but relations between individuals Reconciliationare warm. However, in South Africa, democratization was based on official reconciliation but distance and wariness between whites and blacks prevail. Despite these differences, Bucaille argues, South African, Algerian, and French ex-adversaries face a similar challenge: how to extricate oneself from colonial domination and the violence of war in order to build relationships based on trust.

Urban Violence in Africa

Nevertheless, the study of urban violence qua urban violence has been rather sparse in Africa. The singular exception to this is South Africa, whose long history of structural violence dates back to the apartheid era.

Urban Violence in Africa

The urban environment is a breeding ground for various forms of violence. As the hub of political, social and economic processes, the city is the meeting point for peoples from diverse cultural, racial, and religious backgrounds. It is often the venue of intense class and social struggles for scarce economic resources as well as political power. While the daily struggle for survival is usually nonconfrontational, when the economic-cum-political situation deteriorates, the city streets provide the venue for riots, demonstrations and even revolution. Because of the relative anonymity of city-life, it is also an attractive place for the more undesirable elements in society: thieves, rapists, murderers etc., who can commit crimes without fear of recognition. The urban context of violence is well established in the literature, and has been particularly emphasized by students of social change and revolution. Nevertheless, the study of urban violence qua urban violence has been rather sparse in Africa. The singular exception to this is South Africa, whose long history of structural violence dates back to the apartheid era. This phenomenon has been fairly well studied, although not specifically as urban violence. The pilot studies on three countries in this volume are part of a continent-wide comparative research project aimed at filling this huge gap in the literature. A research project on urban violence in Africa could not be more timely: All over Africa, criminal, political, religious and other social conflicts have been on the increase. The dwindling economic capacities and governance crises prevent governments from dealing effectively with these conflicts, which have often degenerated into situations of violence. These pilot studies and the larger project are expected to highlight these linkages and suggest the way forward. By their very nature, the studies are both exploratory and empirical. Problems are identified and suggestions are being made on how to overcome them. They therefore represent a necessary first step in coming to grips with issues raised by urban violence.

People s War

Conventional wisdom has it that most died as a result of the ANC’s people’s war. Many books have been written on South Africa’s political transition, but none has dealt adequately with the people’s war. This book does.

People s War

More than 25 years have passed since South Africans were being shot or hacked or burned to death in political violence, and the memory of the trauma has faded. Nevertheless, some 20 500 people were killed between 1984 and 1994. Conventional wisdom has it that most died as a result of the ANC’s people’s war. Many books have been written on South Africa’s political transition, but none has dealt adequately with the people’s war. This book does. It shows the extraordinary success of the people’s war in giving the ANC a virtual monopoly on power, as well as the great cost at which this was done. The high price of it is still being paid. Apart from the terror and killings it sparked at the time, the people’s war set in motion forces that cannot easily be tamed. Violence, once unleashed, is not easy to stamp out. ‘Ungovernability’, once generated, is not readily reversed. For this new edition, Anthea Jeffery has revised and abridged her seminal work. She has also included a brief overview of the ANC’s National Democratic Revolution for which the people’s war was intended to prepare the way. Since 1994, the NDR has been implemented in many different spheres. It is now being speeded up in its second and more radical phase.

Stress testing South Africa

South Africa's transition from apartheid to democracy in 1994 was expected to usher in a new era of peace, stability, and accelerated development.

Stress testing South Africa

South Africa's transition from apartheid to democracy in 1994 was expected to usher in a new era of peace, stability, and accelerated development. However, despite widespread optimism, political violence has persisted. Although a fraction of that experienced under apartheid, levels of political violence are worsening and indicative of the country's potential fragility. They also map out the fault lines along which South Africa may yet stumble. Political violence in South Africa is primarily driven by poverty, inequality, and patronage. In the medium and long term catastrophic political violence may be triggered by a generalized sense that many of the promises of the anti-apartheid struggle remain at least a generation away. This realization, coupled with growing socioeconomic and political gaps between elites and the average citizen, poses the greatest threat to stability and security in South Africa. To avoid this scenario, fundamental changes to the status quo are needed. Citizens must again come to see tangible evidence that government is interested in the socioeconomic priorities of ordinary citizens. In other words, the South African government must regain public trust. This will require breaking up the current intertwining of political authority and economic opportunity. To do so will entail reducing the patronage value political office currently affords and establishing a more significant and institutionalized role for independent watchdog groups. Rebuilding the public order capacity of the South African Police Service will simultaneously enhance efforts to tamp down on the use of violence for political advantage while improving the state's effectiveness to maintain stability in the face of popular protests.

Young Warriors

Marks revisits their lives at the beginning of the third millennium in a new democratic South Africa characterised by a radical decline in this social movement."--BOOK JACKET.

Young Warriors

Marks revisits their lives at the beginning of the third millennium in a new democratic South Africa characterised by a radical decline in this social movement."--BOOK JACKET.

Dynamics of Political Violence

By considering a wide range of empirical cases, such as anarchist movements, ethno-nationalist and left-wing militancy in Europe, contemporary Islamist violence, and insurgencies in South Africa and Latin America, this pathbreaking volume ...

Dynamics of Political Violence

Dynamics of Political Violence examines how violence emerges and develops from episodes of contentious politics. By considering a wide range of empirical cases, such as anarchist movements, ethno-nationalist and left-wing militancy in Europe, contemporary Islamist violence, and insurgencies in South Africa and Latin America, this pathbreaking volume of research identifies the forces that shape radicalization and violent escalation. It also contributes to the process-and-mechanism-based models of contentious politics that have been developing over the past decade in both sociology and political science. Chapters of original research emphasize how the processes of radicalization and violence are open-ended, interactive, and context dependent. They offer detailed empirical accounts as well as comprehensive and systematic analyses of the dynamics leading to violent episodes. Specifically, the chapters converge around four dynamic processes that are shown to be especially germane to radicalization and violence: dynamics of movement-state interaction; dynamics of intra-movement competition; dynamics of meaning formation and transformation; and dynamics of diffusion.

Violence in South Africa

Violence in South Africa contains contributions on various issues related to violence in South Africa.

Violence in South Africa

Violence in South Africa contains contributions on various issues related to violence in South Africa. The variety of perspectives, explanations and intervention strategies indicates that violence, its causes and prevention are diverse and complex matters. Hence a single perspective or universal explanation cannot properly explain the phenomenon. Factors related to the micro- and macro-levels, as well as the interaction between these levels, should be considered. The contributions consequently do not deal only with violence of a structural, collective or political nature, but also the far more prevalent forms of interpersonal and small group-violence.

Into the Heart of the Whore

N. Chabani Manganyi and André du Toit (Eds), Political Violence and the Struggle in South Africa, Johannesburg: Southern Book Publishers, 1990. 11 Don Foster, Dennis Davis and Diane Sandler, Detention and Torture in South Africa.

Into the Heart of the Whore

The ongoing assassinations of anti-apartheid activists led to rumours that some kind of third force must be responsible. The South African government flatly denied any involvement. All investigations of the matter were met with stony silence. The first crack in the wall came with the publication by the Vrye Weekblad newspaper of the extraordinary story of Dirk Coetzee, former Security Branch Captain. His tale of murder, kidnapping, bombing and poisoning provided corroboration of the shocking confessions made by Almond Nofemela on death row. Slowly the dark secret started unravelling under the probing of determined journalists. In the Heart of the Whore introduces the reader to the secret underworld of the death squads. It explains when and why they were created, who ran them, what methods they employed, who the victims and perpetrators were. Jacques Pauw was more closely involved with the subject than any other person outside the police and armed forces. In this groundbreaking work he looks at the devastating effect of the secret war on the opponents of apartheid as well as the corrosive effects on the people who committed these crimes.

Young Women Against Apartheid

This book tells their story, analysing what life was like for African girls under apartheid, why some chose to join the struggle, and how they navigated the benefits and pitfalls of political activism.

Young Women Against Apartheid


The Politics of the New South Africa

This book provides an appraisal of critical moments in South Africa's history: segregation and racial supremacy, black opposition, politics under apartheid and violence and terror.

The Politics of the New South Africa

For undergraduate and taught masters courses on modern South Africa as part of a politics, area studies, development studies or combined social sciences degree. This book provides an appraisal of critical moments in South Africa's history: segregation and racial supremacy, black opposition, politics under apartheid and violence and terror. The authors include up-to-date information such as the transfer of power in 1994, enfranchisement and political realignment, the post-electoral period of adjustment and socio-economic transition, the findings of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the 1999 elections.

The Vaal Uprising of 1984 and the Struggle for Freedom in South Africa

Rueedi, F., '“They Would Remind You of 1960”: The Emergence of Radical Student Politics in the Vaal Triangle, ... to Populist Violence', in C. Manganyi and A. du Toit (eds), Political Violence and the Struggle in South Africa (London, ...

The Vaal Uprising of 1984 and the Struggle for Freedom in South Africa

Offers new insights into the struggle against Apartheid, and the poverty and inequality that instigated political resistance.

Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding

This book seeks to examine the causes of escalation and de-escalation in intrastate conflicts.

Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding

This book seeks to examine the causes of escalation and de-escalation in intrastate conflicts. Specifically, the volume seeks to map the processes and dynamics that lead groups challenging existing power structures to engage in violent struggle; the processes and dynamics that contribute to the de-escalation of violent struggle and the participation of challengers in peaceful political activities; and the processes and dynamics that sustain and nurture this transformation. By integrating the latest ideas with richly presented case studies, this volume fills a gap in our understanding of the forces that lead to moderation and constructive engagement in the context of violent, intrastate conflicts. This volume will be of great interest to students of conflict management, peace studies, conflict resolution, ethnic conflict and security studies in general.