Population Genetics

A Concise Guide

Population Genetics

This book is indispensable for students working in a laboratory setting or studying free-ranging populations.

Population Genetics

Population Genetics


Human Population Genetics

Human Population Genetics

Introductory guide to human population genetics and microevolutionary theory Providing an introduction to mathematical population genetics, Human Population Genetics gives basic background on the mechanisms of human microevolution. This text combines mathematics, biology, and anthropology and is best suited for advanced undergraduate and graduate study. Thorough and accessible, Human Population Genetics presents concepts and methods of population genetics specific to human population study, utilizing uncomplicated mathematics like high school algebra and basic concepts of probability to explain theories central to the field. By describing changes in the frequency of genetic variants from one generation to the next, this book hones in on the mathematical basis of evolutionary theory. Human Population Genetics includes: Helpful formulae for learning ease Graphs and analogies that make basic points and relate the evolutionary process to mathematical ideas Glossary terms marked in boldface within the book the first time they appear In-text citations that act as reference points for further research Exemplary case studies Topics such as Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, inbreeding, mutation, genetic drift, natural selection, and gene flow Human Population Genetics solidifies knowledge learned in introductory biological anthropology or biology courses and makes it applicable to genetic study. NOTE: errata for the first edition can be found at the author's website: http://employees.oneonta.edu/relethjh/HPG/errata.pdf

Population Genetics and Microevolutionary Theory

Population Genetics and Microevolutionary Theory

The advances made possible by the development of molecular techniques have in recent years revolutionized quantitative genetics and its relevance for population genetics. Population Genetics and Microevolutionary Theory takes a modern approach to population genetics, incorporating modern molecular biology, species-level evolutionary biology, and a thorough acknowledgment of quantitative genetics as the theoretical basis for population genetics. Logically organized into three main sections on population structure and history, genotype-phenotype interactions, and selection/adaptation Extensive use of real examples to illustrate concepts Written in a clear and accessible manner and devoid of complex mathematical equations Includes the author's introduction to background material as well as a conclusion for a handy overview of the field and its modern applications Each chapter ends with a set of review questions and answers Offers helpful general references and Internet links

Mathematical Population Genetics 1

Theoretical Introduction

Mathematical Population Genetics 1

This is the first of a planned two-volume work discussing the mathematical aspects of population genetics with an emphasis on evolutionary theory. This volume draws heavily from the author’s 1979 classic, but it has been revised and expanded to include recent topics which follow naturally from the treatment in the earlier edition, such as the theory of molecular population genetics.

Population Genetics

Population Genetics

This book aims to make population genetics approachable, logical and easily understood. To achieve these goals, the book’s design emphasizes well explained introductions to key principles and predictions. These are augmented with case studies as well as illustrations along with introductions to classical hypotheses and debates. Pedagogical features in the text include: Interact boxes that guide readers step-by-step through computer simulations using public domain software. Math boxes that fully explain mathematical derivations. Methods boxes that give insight into the use of actual genetic data. Numerous Problem boxes are integrated into the text to reinforce concepts as they are encountered. Dedicated website at www.wiley.com/go/hamiltongenetics This text also offers a highly accessible introduction to coalescent theory, the major conceptual advance in population genetics of the last two decades.

Population Genetics

A Concise Guide

Population Genetics

"In a species with a million individuals," writes John H. Gillespie, "it takes roughly a million generations for genetic drift to change allele frequencies appreciably. There is no conceivable way of verifying that genetic drift changes allele frequencies in most natural populations. Our understanding that it does is entirely theoretical. Most population geneticists are not only comfortable with this state of affairs, but revel in the fact that they can demonstrate on the back of an envelope, rather than in the laboratory, how an important evolutionary force operates." Longer than the back of an envelope but more concise than many books on the subject, this brief introduction to the field of population genetics offers students and researchers an overview of a discipline that is of growing importance. Chapter topics include genetic drift; natural selection; non-random mating, quantitative genetics; and the evolutionary advantage of sex. While each chapter treats a specific topic or problem in genetics, the common thread throughout the book is what Gillespie calls "the main obsession of our field," the recurring question, "Why is there so much genetic variation in natural populations?" "Population genetics remains the central intellectual connection between genetics and evolution. As genetics becomes integral to all aspects of biology, the unifying nature of evolutionary studies rests more and more on population genetics. This book lays out much of the foundation of population genetics augmented with interesting particulars and conceptual insight. Population genetics involves ideas that are quantitative and often difficult for biology undergraduates, but Professor Gillespie offershis characteristically clear thinking and articulate explanations." -- Charles Langley, University of California-Davis

A Primer of Molecular Population Genetics

A Primer of Molecular Population Genetics

What are the genomic signatures of adaptations in DNA? How often does natural selection dictate changes to DNA? How does the ebb and flow in the abundance of individuals over time get marked onto chromosomes to record genetic history? Molecular population genetics seeks to answer such questions by explaining genetic variation and molecular evolution from micro-evolutionary principles. It provides a way to learn about how evolution works and how it shapes species by incorporating molecular details of DNA as the heritable material. It enables us to understand the logic of how mutations originate, change in abundance in populations, and become fixed as DNA sequence divergence between species. With the revolutionary advances in genomic data acquisition, understanding molecular population genetics is now a fundamental requirement for today's life scientists. These concepts apply in analysis of personal genomics, genome-wide association studies, landscape and conservation genetics, forensics, molecular anthropology, and selection scans. This book introduces, in an accessible way, the bare essentials of the theory and practice of molecular population genetics.

The Origins of Theoretical Population Genetics

With a New Afterword

The Origins of Theoretical Population Genetics

Tracing the development of population genetics through the writings of such luminaries as Darwin, Galton, Pearson, Fisher, Haldane, and Wright, William B. Provine sheds light on this complex field as well as its bearing on other branches of biology.

Understanding Population Genetics

Understanding Population Genetics

Interpretations, extensions and comments -- Altruism and natural selection via individuals and groups -- Frequency-dependent selection and resource competition -- Rare allele advantage due to infections and self-incompatibility -- Questions -- Chapter 9 Selection on a quantitative trait -- Analysis -- Selection in quantitative genetics -- Selection in population genetics - one more time -- Notations and assumptions -- Combining the tools -- Summing up -- Interpretations, extensions and comments -- The genetic effect of selection on a quantitative trait -- The limits of selection and the nature of -- Threshold selection and disease liability -- Quantitative genetics is not suited for causal analyses -- Chapter 10 Evolutionary genetic analysis of the sex ratio -- Analysis -- Assumptions and notations -- Finding the recursion equation system -- Testing for stability -- Summing up -- Interpretations, extensions and comments -- Sex ratio selection -- An explanation of well-delimited validity -- Meiotic recombination is an evolved genetic system -- Evolutionary genetic analysis -- What's next? -- Estimates and tests in population genetics -- The mutation-selection balance -- Partial genetic isolation -- Segregation distortion and genetic conflicts -- Epilogue -- Thanks -- Glossary -- Answers -- References -- Index -- EULA