Reminiscences of an Abolitionist

WILLIAM LLOYD GARRISON , the Great American Anti- Slavery Leader . With Portrait specially engraved from a recent Photograph . A HERO FROM THE FORGE : A Biographical Sketch of Elihu Burritt , Orator , Author , and Philanthropist .

Reminiscences of an Abolitionist


Portrait of an Abolitionist

The first modern biography of George L. Stearns, the man who recruited the African-American regiment featured in the movie Glory.

Portrait of an Abolitionist

The first modern biography of George L. Stearns, the man who recruited the African-American regiment featured in the movie Glory.

Slave Portraiture in the Atlantic World

The Cinqué portrait went beyond the written and spoken antislavery rhet— oric of the times and presented Jocelyn with an opportunity to link his role as an artist with his abolitionist and Christian beliefs.

Slave Portraiture in the Atlantic World

Slave Portraiture in the Atlantic World is the first book to focus on the individualized portrayal of enslaved people from the time of Europe's full engagement with plantation slavery in the late sixteenth century to its final official abolition in Brazil in 1888. While this period saw the emergence of portraiture as a major field of representation in Western art, 'slave' and 'portraiture' as categories appear to be mutually exclusive. On the one hand, the logic of chattel slavery sought to render the slave's body as an instrument for production, as the site of a non-subject. Portraiture, on the contrary, privileged the face as the primary visual matrix for the representation of a distinct individuality. Essays address this apparent paradox of 'slave portraits' from a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives, probing the historical conditions that made the creation of such rare and enigmatic objects possible and exploring their implications for a more complex understanding of power relations under slavery.

The Abolitionists and the South 1831 1861

In attempting to integrate southern antislavery action into the existing portrait of that movement, I am indebted to the creative scholars who over the past thirty-odd years have achieved such a remarkably sophisticated understanding of ...

The Abolitionists and the South  1831 1861

Within the American antislavery movement, abolitionists were distinct from others in the movement in advocating, on the basis of moral principle, the immediate emancipation of slaves and equal rights for black people. Instead of focusing on the "immediatists" as products of northern culture, as many previous historians have done, Stanley Harrold examines their involvement with antislavery action in the South--particularly in the region that bordered the free states. How, he asks, did antislavery action in the South help shape abolitionist beliefs and policies in the period leading up to the Civil War? Harrold explores the interaction of northern abolitionist, southern white emancipators, and southern black liberators in fostering a continuing antislavery focus on the South, and integrates southern antislavery action into an understanding of abolitionist reform culture. He discusses the impact of abolitionist missionaries, who preached an antislavery gospel to the enslaved as well as to the free. Harrold also offers an assessment of the impact of such activities on the coming of the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Rendering Violence

Richard Powell, “Cinqué: Antislavery Portraiture and Patronage in Jacksonian America,” American Art 11 (Fall 1997): 48–73; ... “Cinque: A Heroic Portrait for the Abolitionist Cause,” in Slave Portraiture in the Atlantic World, ed.

Rendering Violence

Rendering Violence explores the problems and possibilities that the subject of political violence presented to American painters working between 1830 and 1890, a turbulent period during which common citizens frequently abandoned orderly forms of democratic expression to riot, strike, and protest violently. Examining a range of critical texts, this book shows for the first time that nineteenth-century American aesthetic theory defined painting as a privileged vehicle for the representation of political order and the stabilization of liberal-democratic life. Analyzing seven paintings by Thomas Cole, John Quidor, Nathaniel Jocelyn, George Henry Hall, Thomas Nast, Martin Leisser, and Robert Koehler, Ross Barrett reconstructs the strategies that American artists developed to explore the symbolic power of violence in a medium aligned ideologically with lawful democracy. He argues that American paintings of upheaval ÒrenderÓ their subjects in divergent ways. By exploring the inner conflicts that structure these painterly projects, Barrett sheds new light on the politicized pressures that shaped visual representation in the nineteenth century and on the anxieties and ambivalences that have long defined American responses to political turmoil.

OCR GCSE History SHP The Making of America 1789 1900

This portrait of Brown was painted in 1859 by Ole Peter Hansen Booling, a Norwegian artist working in the USA. It shows something of Brown's intense and fanatical devotion to the abolition of slavery in America.

OCR GCSE History SHP  The Making of America 1789 1900

Exam board: OCR (Specification B, SHP) Level: GCSE (9-1) Subject: History First teaching: September 2016 First exams: Summer 2018 An OCR endorsed textbook Let SHP successfully steer you through the OCR B specification with an exciting, enquiry-based series, combining best practice teaching methods and worthwhile tasks to develop students' historical knowledge and skills. The engaging, accessible text covers the content you need for teacher-led lessons and independent study Step-by-step enquiries inspired by best practice in KS3 help to simplify lesson planning and ensure continuous progression within and across units The scaffolded three-part task structure enables students to record, reflect on and review their learning Suitably challenging tasks encourage high achievers to excel at GCSE while clear explanations make key concepts accessible to all A range of purposeful, intriguing visual and written source material is embedded at the heart of each investigation to enhance understanding Memorable case studies, diagrams, infographics and contemporary photos bring fascinating events and people to life

Antislavery Violence

A contrary example would be Charles L. Stearns ; see Charles Heller , Portrait of an Abolitionist : A Biography of George Luther Stearns , 1809-1867 ( Westport , Conn .: Greenwood Press , 1996 ) , 69-81 . 99.

Antislavery Violence

Historians present 10 essays on violent action in the US against the institution of slavery and its defenders during the 60 years before the Civil War. Their characters include southern slave rebels, antislavery women in Kansas, violent slave rescuers in Ohio, and northern anti-slavery politicians. They show how the violence helped unite black and white enemies of slavery and how antebellum concepts of gender played a role in justifying and participating in violence.

Miscellaneous Catalogues of Autographs

Dist . antislavery politician ; took part in the anti - slavery movement in England ; in 1844 was candidate of the Liberal party for Prest . , which resulted in defeating Henry Clay . Colored portrait , photograph and cuttings .

Miscellaneous Catalogues of Autographs


The Pageant of America Builders of the Republic by F A Ogg

Popular sovereignty, 299. Postoffice, Franklin and, 135; exclusion of abolitionist mail, 262. Pownall, Thomas, portrait, 67; on repeal of Townshend Acts, 67. Pratt, H. C., “John M. Clayton,” 293. Pratt, Matthew, “Cadwallader Colden,” 50 ...

The Pageant of America     Builders of the Republic  by F  A  Ogg


Picturing Political Power

British and American reformers adopted her portrait as an antislavery icon. Wheatley was emancipated soon after her book's publication, but, without her patrons' support, she never published another volume. In 1837, the abolitionist ...

Picturing Political Power

"For as long as American women have battled for equitable political representation, those battles have been defined by images--whether drawn, etched, photographed, or filmed. Some of these have been flattering, many of them have been condescending, and some have been scabrous. They have drawn upon prevailing cultural tropes about the perceived nature of women's roles and abilities, and they have circulated both with and without conscious political objectives. Allison K. Lange takes a systematic look at American women's efforts to control the production and dissemination of images of them in the long battle for representation, from the mid-nineteenth-century onward"--

Portraits of Resistance

impassioned letter published in abolitionist newspapers : “ The negro - haters of the north , and the negro - stealers of the south will not tolerate a portrait of a negro in a picture gallery . " As Wright noted , the subject's ...

Portraits of Resistance

A highly original history of American portraiture that places the experiences of enslaved people at its center This timely and eloquent book tells a new history of American art: how enslaved people mobilized portraiture for acts of defiance. Revisiting the origins of portrait painting in the United States, Jennifer Van Horn reveals how mythologies of whiteness and of nation building erased the aesthetic production of enslaved Americans of African descent and obscured the portrait's importance as a site of resistance. Moving from the wharves of colonial Rhode Island to antebellum Louisiana plantations to South Carolina townhouses during the Civil War, the book illuminates how enslaved people's relationships with portraits also shaped the trajectory of African American art post-emancipation. Van Horn asserts that Black creativity, subjecthood, viewership, and iconoclasm constituted instances of everyday rebellion against systemic oppression. Portraits of Resistance is not only a significant intervention in the fields of American art and history but also an important contribution to the reexamination of racial constructs on which American culture was built.

Encyclopedia of the Romantic Era 1760 1850

Prior's intelligent and highly-individuated portraits argued the abolitionist cause, as- serted a black identity, and countered both the cartoon images of the ... Fabian, Monroe H. Mr. Sully, Portrait Painter: The Works of Thomas Sully.

Encyclopedia of the Romantic Era  1760   1850

In 850 analytical articles, this two-volume set explores the developments that influenced the profound changes in thought and sensibility during the second half of the eighteenth century and the first half of the nineteenth century. The Encyclopedia provides readers with a clear, detailed, and accurate reference source on the literature, thought, music, and art of the period, demonstrating the rich interplay of international influences and cross-currents at work; and to explore the many issues raised by the very concepts of Romantic and Romanticism.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Guernsey County Ohio

In politics the Doctor was first an old - line Whig , then a Free - soiler , next an Abolitionist and then a Republican . He was a delegate to the first State Convention held by the Republican party , and continued to give to it his ...

Portrait and Biographical Record of Guernsey County  Ohio


The Good Sharps

5 Johan Joseph Zoffany, The Sharp Family (1779–81), from a private collection; on loan to the National Portrait Gallery, London. 6 Johan Joseph Zoffany, Self-Portrait with His Daughter Maria Theresa, James Cervetto, and Giacobbe ...

The Good Sharps

The enthralling story of an eighteenth-century family and their extraordinary achievements. Four brothers, three sisters. Brought up in a Northumberland rectory and in the close of Durham Cathedral, the Sharps would achieve exalted positions at the heart of British society. In 1781, the celebrated painter Johan Zoffany put the final brush strokes on the luminous portrait that immortalised the siblings’ rise, and their remarkable unity and passion for life. Ambitious, free-thinking and courageous, the Sharps were pioneers in the major movements that defined the eighteenth century – from political reform and philanthropy to medicine and industry. John, an eminent priest, established a model welfare state at Bamburgh Castle and commissioned the world’s first lifeboat; William became surgeon to George III; while James was a visionary inventor, canal promoter and engineer. Most famously of all, Granville, the youngest son, battled tirelessly as Britain’s first great campaigner for the abolition of the slave trade. Despite the social strictures of their day, Elizabeth, Judith and Frances claimed significant independence, and played key roles in hosting the Sharps’ famous musical parties on barges on the Thames. In this vivid, moving biography, Hester Grant charts the siblings’ shared journey to prominence, and explores the values and enduring bonds that inspired their success. The Good Sharps brings to life not just these men and women who realised that the future could be different, but also the new world they created.

Princeton Alumni Weekly

The tion of slavery . relations and labor without the vio- abolitionists " shouted , ” " denounced . ... A T is not surprising that historians revised and purged of many of its prohostile portrait of the abolitionists is , Southern ...

Princeton Alumni Weekly


Empire and Popular Culture

Portrait of the late Stafford Allen, Esq., nephew of the noted abolitionist, William Allen, F.R.S., himself an abolitionist of over fi y years' standing. 46. Portrait of the late Rt. Hon. Sir Bartle Frere, G.C.B., G.C.S.I., ...

Empire and Popular Culture

From 1830, if not before, the Empire began to permeate the domestic culture of Empire nations in many ways. From consumables, to the excitement of colonial wars, celebrations relating to events in the history of Empire, and the construction of Empire Day in the early Edwardian period, most citizens were encouraged to think of themselves not only as citizens of a nation but of an Empire. Much of the popular culture of the period presented Empire as a force for ‘civilisation’ but it was often far from the truth and rather, Empire was a repressive mechanism designed ultimately to benefit white settlers and the metropolitan economy. This four volume collection on Empire and Popular Culture contains a wide array of primary sources, complimented by editorial narratives which help the reader to understand the significance of the documents contained therein. It is informed by the recent advocacy of a ‘four-nation’ approach to Empire containing documents which view Empire from the perspective of England, Scotland Ireland and Wales and will also contain material produced for Empire audiences, as well as indigenous perspectives. The sources reveal both the celebratory and the notorious sides of Empire. In this, the third volume of Empire and Popular Culture, documents are presented that shed light on three principal themes: The shaping of personal. collective and national identities of British citizens by the Empire; the commemoration of individuals and collective groups who were noted for their roles in Empire building; and finally, the way in which the Empire entered popular culture by means of trade with the Empire and the goods that were imported.

Roman Error

In response, abolitionist Henry Clarke Wright, a friend of Purvis, wrote a passionate letter to the Pennsylvania Freeman, a Philadelphia ... His portrait would be a standing anti-slavery lecture to slaveholders and their apologists.

Roman Error

In the eyes of posterity, ancient Rome is deeply flawed. The list of censures is long and varied, from political corruption and the practice of slavery, to religious intolerance and sexual immorality, yet for centuries the Romans' "errors" have not only provoked opprobrium, but also inspired wayward and novel forms of thought and representation, themselves errant in the broad sense of the Latin verb. This volume is the first to examine this phenomenon in depth, treating examples from history, philosophy, literature, psychoanalysis, and art history, from antiquity to the present, to examine how the Romans' faults have become the basis for creative experimentation, for rejections of prevailing ideology, even for comedy and delight. In demonstrating that the reception of Rome's missteps and mistakes has been far more complex than simply denouncing them as an exemplum malum to be shunned and avoided, it argues compellingly that these "alternative" receptions are historically important and enduringly relevant in their own right. "Roman error" comes to signify both ancient misstep and something that we may commit when engaging with Roman antiquity, whereby reception may even be conceived as "error" of a kind: while the volume ably addresses popular fascination with a wide range of Roman vices, including violence, imperial domination, and decadence, it also asks us to consider what makes certain receptions matter, how they matter, and why.

The Barbaric Punishment

The statistical portrait was as follows : Abolitionist for all crimes • Abolitionist for ordinary crimes only • • Abolitionist in practice Retentionist • Amnesty International also provided the relevant dates of abolition , where ...

The Barbaric Punishment

In this volume, Swedish human rights activist and political figure, Hans Göran Franck, examines the administration of the death penalty from a historical perspective. The author's opinions are based on his lifelong work and devotion to abolishing the 'barbaric punishment'. Building upon previously unpublished material and considerable detail drawn from Franck's personal experiences, it focuses on both the progressive developments within European countries and institutions over several decades, and the frustratingly retrograde situation that prevails in the United States. The author dedicated this book to those facing a sentence of death. During the course of his work, the author traveled to numerous countries and met many condemned men and women. Publication of this important volume, which comes a few years after Hans Göran Franck's untimely passing, coincides with a major development to which he contributed, the adoption of Protocol No. 13 to the European Convention on Human Rights, which abolishes capital punishment in both wartime and peacetime. William A. Schabas a law professor who specializes in the subject of capital punishment, has ensured that the manuscript is up to date, and contributed the introductory chapter.

First City

mittee” of the society, chaired by John Neagle, refused to exhibit the portrait. Why, asked the National Anti/Slavery Standard, was the painting banned? Certainly not because of the character of Cinqué. The Supreme Court had ruled him ...

First City

Covering more than two centuries of social, economic, and political change, and offering a challenging, innovative approach to urban as well national history, First City tells the Philadelphia story through the wealth of material culture its citizens have chosen to preserve.