Positive Solitude

A holistic approach to the challenge of loneliness, loss of community and failed relationships.

Positive Solitude

A holistic approach to the challenge of loneliness, loss of community and failed relationships.

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Solitude Silence and Loneliness

School leaders and teachers could be encouraged to promote opportunities for students to engage in positive experiences of solitude practices, because pupils who spend a moderate amount of time by themselves appear to be better adjusted ...

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Solitude  Silence and Loneliness

The Bloomsbury Handbook of Solitude, Silence and Loneliness is the first major account integrating research on solitude, silence and loneliness from across academic disciplines and across the lifespan. The editors explore how being alone – in its different forms, positive and negative, as solitude, silence and loneliness – is learned and developed, and how it is experienced in childhood and youth, adulthood and old age. Philosophical, psychological, historical, cultural and religious issues are addressed by distinguished scholars from Europe, North and Latin America, and Asia.

The Handbook of Solitude

Physical, mental, and/or emotional solitude may help effectuate these changes. Mindfulness practice provides an opportunity for people to turn inward and nonjudgmentally witness their inner experiences. Therefore, positive solitude is ...

The Handbook of Solitude

Learn more about the positive and negative psychological effects of solitude, isolation, and being alone in this expertly edited resource It has never been more important to understand the impact of solitude. The newly revised and updated second edition of The Handbook Of Solitude: Psychological Perspectives On Social Isolation, Social Withdrawal, and Being Alone delivers another comprehensive academic volume of psychological research on the topic of solitude. This second edition includes a new organizational framework that considers both contemporary and emerging conceptual perspectives along with a more nuanced approach to the significance of context in the study of solitude. There is also an increased focus on clinical, developmental, and social psychological perspectives. The latest edition also offers new discussions regarding recent trends in the positive aspects of solitude, including a new chapter on mindfulness, and provides more detailed coverage of the emerging impact of social media and computer gaming on psychological health and well-being across the lifespan. Scholars from across the world have contributed to this volume, coming from countries including Australia, Canada, China, Finland, Greece, Poland, South Korea and the USA, among others. The editors offer a broad and complete perspective that will appeal to many disciplines within psychology, and the book provides accessible content that is relatively brief in length and edited to remove unnecessary technical jargon. The book also includes: Lengthy discussions of historical and theoretical perspectives on solitude, including the phenomenon of social withdrawal in childhood An exploration of the significance of close relationships, including with peers and parents, on experiences of being alone and psychological well-being A treatment of the neuroscientific and evolutionary perspectives on shyness and social withdrawal A comprehensive section on solitude across the lifespan, including expressions of shyness in infancy and childhood, the causes and consequences of playing alone in childhood, social withdrawal in adolescence and emerging adulthood, being single in adulthood, and isolation, loneliness, and solitude in older adulthood A consideration of solitary confinement as an extreme form of social isolation Careful cultural consideration of solitude and related constructs with new chapters on immigration and hikikomori Perfect for advanced undergraduate and graduate level students taking a variety of courses in developmental, biological, social, personality, organizational, health, educational, cognitive, and clinical psychology, the second edition of The Handbook Of Solitude has also earned a place in the libraries of researchers and scholars in these, and related psychological disciplines.

Proceedings of the Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium

Such a definition , however , can apply only to positive solitude . Solitude , particularly in the form of loneliness , can be a terrifying state , and solitary confinement is one of the worst punishments that society can confer .

Proceedings of the     Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium


Solitude and its Ambiguities in Modernist Fiction

—Paul Halmos, Solitude and Privacy (1952) Our attitude to solitude . . . is extremely paradoxical. We need it; we suffer from it; and we flee from it. Potentially positive, solitude is often painful . . . —Joanne Wieland-Burston ...

Solitude and its Ambiguities in Modernist Fiction

In this study of solitude in high modernist writing, Edward Engelberg explores the ways in which solitude functions thematically to shape meaning in literary works, as well as what solitude as a condition has contributed to the making of a trope. Selected novels are analyzed for the ambiguities that solitude injects into their meanings. The freedom of solitude also becomes a burden from which the protagonists seek liberation. Although such ambiguities about solitude exist from the Bible and the Ancients through the centuries following, they change within the context of time. The story of solitude in the twentieth century moves from the self's removal from society and retreat into nature to an extra-social position within which the self confronts itself. A chapter is devoted to the synoptic analysis of solitude in the West, with emphasis on the Renaissance to the twentieth century, and another chapter analyzes the ambiguities that set the stage for modernism: Defoe's Robinson Crusoe. Selected works by Woolf, Mann, Camus, Sartre, and Beckett highlight particular modernist issues of solitude and how their authors sought to resolve them.

Positive Solitude

Positive Solitude


Loneliness

I am not aware of any academics who would call the joys that one enjoys alone 'positive loneliness', although this term appears in some lay people's discussions. To me such term is an oxymoron – loneliness is necessarily a negative ...

Loneliness

In recent years its medical implications have brought loneliness to the centre of attention of mass media, government agents, and the general public. However, as this volume demonstrates, loneliness is not merely a psychological, individual, or health issue. In multiple ways, it is a serious social problem as well. Yang urges fellow researchers and scientists to broaden the existing definition and classification of loneliness, to measure loneliness with greater accuracy, and to establish more specifically the connection between loneliness and particular illness. Drawing on vast sources of data including literary works, case studies, and large-scale sample surveys covering a broad spectrum of countries (Europe and beyond), the empirical research of this study produces and presents simple but effective evidence for the social nature and variations of loneliness. Examining loneliness at higher levels, including ethnic groups, classes, national cultures, and societies, Loneliness will appeal to students and researchers interested in areas such as sociology, pyschology, and mental health.

Solitude and Loneliness

For example, in practising generosity, we generate the positive state of mind to more effectively meditate. ... and loneliness (although, as we shall see, a sense of loneliness may initially become accentuated when we first commit ...

Solitude and Loneliness

Referencing cultural touchstones such as Into The Wild, the art of Edward Hopper, and the work of Charlie Chaplin, Sarvananda considers what we think about being alone. Buddhism suggests that solitude can bring about positive emotion and change. Exploring this idea through personal experience, psychology and myth the author shows how facing our essential aloneness can lead us to better understand our essential relatedness.

Navigating Loneliness

When we see solitude through a lens of escaping from the masses, as a place of retreat and renewal, we can more readily celebrate and appreciate the time we get ... Edgar Allan Poe The Benefits of Positive Solitude Solitude offers: 1.

Navigating Loneliness


Handbook of Adolescent Development

Additional research on the link between solitude and adjustment among adolescents is certainly in order (Buchholz & Catton, 1999). Data obtained with the experience ... This positive aftereffect of solitude does not hold for children, ...

Handbook of Adolescent Development

Handbook of Adolescent Development fills a gap in the literature on adolescent development and behaviour: all of the authors of the various chapters were invited to include as many findings on European adolescents as possible. Through this specific emphasis, the handbook provides a complement to other reviews of the literature that are mostly based on North American samples. The contributors are all eminent researchers in the field and the individual chapters cover their specific areas of expertise. Theories of adolescence, along with emotional, physical and cognitive issues, are explored. Topics covered include families, peer relations, school and leisure time, as well as problem areas such as depression, drug consumption and delinquency. Handbook of Adolescent Development also incorporates a comprehensive review of the literature in the area and considers avenues for future research. This multidisciplinary text will be of interest to those studying and researching in the fields of developmental psychology, sociology, demography, epidemiology and criminology.

Loneliness Updated

Recent research on loneliness and how it affects our lives Ami Rokach. 'When It's Just Me at Home, ... Results indicate that adolescents experience thedualityof aloneness, including both positive solitude and negative loneliness.

Loneliness Updated

"To be alone is to be different. To be different is to be alone, and to be in the interior of this fatal circle is to be lonely. To be lonely is to have failed" (Susan Schultz, 1976) Loneliness carries a significant social stigma, as lack of friendship and social ties is socially undesirable, and social perceptions of lonely people are generally unfavourable. Lonely people often have very negative self-perceptions, believing that the inability to establish social ties is due to personal inadequacies or socially undesirable attributes. This book is divided into three parts. The first part reviews loneliness in general, describing what it is and how it affects us. The second part examines loneliness throughout the life cycle, analysing how it affects us in childhood, adulthood and as we age. The final part explores the connection between loneliness and other conditions such as arthritis, eating disorders and depression. Loneliness Updated offers the latest research on how loneliness can affect us in our daily lives, and how it is expressed as we travel through life from childhood to old age. It will be a highly interesting read for scholars, students and researchers of clinical psychology, particularly those interested in further exploring the effects and consequences of loneliness. This book was originally published as a special issue of The Journal of Psychology.

Modernizing Solitude

What lies beneath the positive state of solitude is the fearsome sense of loneliness. To avoid or deal with that negative feeling, the authors in this study tried hard to transform their aloneness into solitude by their ingenious ...

Modernizing Solitude

An innovative and timely examination of the concept of solitude in nineteenth-century American literature During the nineteenth century, the United States saw radical developments in media and communication that reshaped concepts of spatiality and temporality. As the telegraph, the postal system, and public transportation became commonplace, the country achieved a level of connectedness that was never possible before. At this level, physical isolation no longer equaled psychological separation from the exterior world, and as communication networks proliferated, being disconnected took on negative cultural connotations. Though solitude, and the lack thereof, is a pressing concern in today’s culture of omnipresent digital connectivity, Yoshiaki Furui shows that solitude has been a significant preoccupation since the nineteenth-century. The obsession over solitude is evidenced by many writers of the period, with consequences for many basic notions of creativity, art, and personal and spiritual fulfillment. In Modernizing Solitude: The Networked Individual in Nineteenth-Century American Literature, Furui examines, among other works, Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Herman Melville’s “Bartleby, the Scrivener,” Emily Dickinson’s poetry and letters, and telegraphic literature in the 1870s to identify the virtues and values these writers bestowed upon solitude in a time and place where it was being consistently threatened or devalued. Although each writer has a unique way of addressing the theme, they all aim to reclaim solitude as a positive, productive state of being that is essential to the writing process and personal identity. Employing a cross-disciplinary approach to understand modern solitude and the resulting literature, Furui seeks to historicize solitude by anchoring literary works in this revolutionary yet interim period of American communication history, while also applying theoretical insights into the literary analysis.

Loneliness

Solitude is different from loneliness, although from the outside, they may look similar. Both have to do with being alone, but loneliness is negative, while solitude is positive. Loneliness feels like something bad that happens to us, ...

Loneliness

Discover how you can use loneliness to improve your life. Everyone feels lonely sometimes. Sometimes the feeling comes from being truly alone, but it has more to do with feeling alone, unconnected to other human beings. No one likes to feel lonely, but researchers have found that loneliness can actually help us to be better people. It makes us reach out to others. We don't like the way it feels, and so we form connections with other human beings—and these connections help make our world happier, safer, and more satisfying for us all. You'll find out more inside this book!

The Call Of Solitude

This psycholinguistic shift would help us in accepting alonetime as a positive need, distinguishing it from loneliness, which is a consequence of ruptures in relationships or too much immersion in aloneness, just as "merged" or ...

The Call Of Solitude

Achieving inner calm while feeling centered is a human goal that is never easy to master. But why of late do serenity and peace of mind seem further from reach than ever before? The world appears very busy, and finding moments to catch up with ourselves looks to be almost impossible. Something has occurred to change life's circumstances, to make peaceful, restorative time terribly elusive. Alonetime is a great protector of the self and the human spirit. Many in society have railed against it. Some have overused its healing potential. Others have kept it as a special resource both knowingly and unknowingly. ... (Yet) the only way we shall achieve ... ideal love is if we are allowed to flower in the due course and pace of our inner life. Whether or not we were fortunate in our growing up to blossom this way, plenty of time -- alone-times -- awaits us now to make the necessary readjustments.

The Impact of Personality on Participation Decisions in Surveys

Aloneness is neither per se positive nor negative, but it can promote feelings of either loneliness or solitude. Solitude is a positive experience which is “thought to promote individuality, creativity, and self-awareness” (Rokach 2004: ...

The Impact of Personality on Participation Decisions in Surveys

Increasing nonresponse rates in surveys are a matter of concern internationally, as low response rates put the quality of survey data into question. The risk of biased data is high if nonrespondents differ significantly from respondents. In arguing that sample persons’ personality traits are decisive in survey participation decisions, Denise Saßenroth investigates the mechanisms causing increasing nonresponse rates. Based on a modification of the Social Isolation Hypothesis, she analyses the impact of sample persons’ personality on participation decisions with data from the German General Social Survey and the LISS Panel from the Netherlands.

Psychotherapy and the Lonely Patient

Therapists also need to allow their clients the time and solitude that Jane and Mark allowed themselves.Positive solitude almost always invites presence, and a sense of presence dispells loneliness. Finally, therapists help clients find ...

Psychotherapy and the Lonely Patient

Here is an important new book focusing on the contribution of the therapist's love and empathy to the therapeutic process. Technique without dedication, discipline, and understanding will rarely benefit patients nor help resolve their conflicts. Psychoanalytic Technique demonstrates how the therapist's countertransference feelings, anxieties, wishes, and superego admonitions shape his or her therapeutic interventions.

Understand to Be Understood

People in an Imaginer Phase need positive solitude, i.e., time for themselves. The Drooper mask for the Imaginer type is subtle. This is the least obvious of all the masks, because at first glance they appear to be “Computer”.

Understand to Be Understood

In this book there is something for everyone. The theorist will have ample opportunity to test his or her current knowledge against this model, to find answers to questions and to stimulate more thinking. The person who needs to see and understand the value of committing time to learn something new will not be disappointed. You will certainly find a rich source of material that will add value when applied in the workplace. The person who likes to play with theory, tossing it around, testing it on friends and even applying it at work, will like this book, as there will be stimulation enough to satisfy. Those who care about people and want to know how to further improve on the quality of their relationships will love this book. People who need to grasp the nettle of tricky situations and apply what they know to get results quickly that make positive impact on their bottom line will grasp the power of this tool. Those who need to take time to turn things over and examine them by reflecting upon the learning points and seeing how to use the tools will find plenty to stimulate their imaginations. This book about coaching using PCM is overflowing with the complexity and at the same time the ordinariness of people in relationships. This model can help you develop skills in four areas: self-knowledge and self-awareness self-management knowledge and awareness of others relationship management Happy Coaching!

The Voice of the Heart

Thanks to the imagination working in solitude, Peake creates a work within which a work of art takes on independent life, beneath the light of the moon. For Peake, the difference between positive and negative solitude lies in the degree ...

The Voice of the Heart

The profoundly creative works of Mervyn Peake have fascinated readers for sixty years. His Gormenghast sequence of novels - recently serialized to great acclaim by the BBC - stands as one of the great imaginative accomplishments of twentieth-century literature. In The Voice of the Heart, G. Peter Winngington, the world's foremost expert on Peake, sets his subject's well-known fiction in context with the poetry, plays, and book illustrations for which Peake is equally lauded. He traces recurrent motifs through Peake's works (islands, animals, and loneliness, for example) and explores in detail Peake's long-neglected play, The Wit to Woo. Through close readings of all these elements of Peake's oeuvre, Winnington is ultimately able to offer unparalleled insight into the making of one of British literature's most vibrant imaginations.

The paradox of solitude and loneliness

Here, I would like to focus here on the importance of solitude, in other words, autonomy and withdrawal for one's own personal development. The Greek philosopher Epicurus gave solitude a positive meaning, as a form of seclusion in ...

The paradox of solitude and loneliness

Do you enjoy being alone? Are you often lonely? Regardless of how you answer these questions, I would like to offer you some new ways of seeing them. A conscious and mindful life and experience of solitude is the best way to prevent loneliness. Based on interviews with 150 people worldwide as well as current findings from international research on loneliness and results from philosophy, sociology and political science, this book encourages you to embrace and appreciate solitude and loneliness as important companions in life. Solitude is an important process and resource that enables us to become aware of our own wishes, fears and needs. By better understanding how to be alone, we can develop healthier and more self-determined ways of living and more effectively manage our own loneliness. But solitude and loneliness are not only personal feelings and states of mind but also social and political phenomena. How we as a society deal with both says a lot about us as post-modern society and about our values and human needs for connection and belonging, not only in times of Corona. Thus, the book also explores government responses to loneliness, and new initiatives for living lives in which solitude and loneliness are recast as key aspects of being human.

Are You Married or Buried

Transient Loneliness This is loneliness that last only temporarily; from a few minutes to a few months. ... It is different from solitude which is a voluntary withdrawal from others that most often is positive. Solitude can be started ...

Are You Married or Buried

"This book lays out a simple step-by-step process by which anyone can discover, pursue and achieve his or her God-given dream in marriage" Dr David Molapo You may have been through horrible love experiences to a point where your perception about a relationship or marriage is highly impaired or even damaged. You don’t believe in a woman or man anymore. You have a conflict in finding a balance between love and money. You need emotional intelligence to handle conflict with more understanding and maturity. You are frustrated by sexual burn out or sexual dysfunction. This book is for you