Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England

matrix” by allowing one “to restore faith in the goodness of one's strivings and in the kindness of the powers of the universe” (CS, p. 251). A consideration of the Puritan discouragement of selftrust in children suggests that Puritan ...

Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England

For years, scholars have attempted to understand the powerful hold that the sermon had upon the imagination of New England Puritans. In this book Emory Elliott puts forth a complex and striking thesis: that Puritan religious literature provided the myths and metaphors that helped the people to express their deepest doubts and fears, feelings created by their particular cultural situation and aroused by the crucial social events of seventeenth-century America. In his early chapters, the author defines the psychological needs of the second- and third-generation Puritans, arguing that these needs arose from the generational conflict between the founders and their children and from the methods of child rearing and religious education employed in Puritan New England. In the later chapters, he reveals how the ministers responded to the crisis in their society by reshaping theology and constructing in their sermons a religious language that helped to fulfill the most urgent psychological needs of the people. Originally published in 1975. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The New England Soul Preaching and Religious Culture in Colonial New England

20. See William Hubbard, "Sermon Notes," in Sermons Collection, AAS; and John Leverett, "Sermon Notes," 1679. 21. In Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England, 13-14, Emory Elliott classifies printed sermons according to date and ...

The New England Soul   Preaching and Religious Culture in Colonial New England

Throughout the colonial era, New England's only real public spokesmen were the Congregational ministers. One result is that the ideological origins of the American Revolution are nowhere more clearly seen than in the sermons they preached. The New England Soul is the first comprehensive analysis of preaching in New England from the founding of the Puritan colonies to the outbreak of the Revolution. Using a multi-disciplinary approach--including analysis of rhetorical style and concept of identity and community--Stout examines more than two thousand sermons spanning five generations of ministers, including such giants of the pulpit as John Cotton, Thomas Shepard, Increase and Cotton Mather, George Whitefield, Jonathan Edwards, Jonathan Mayhew, and Charles Chauncy. Equally important, however, are the manuscript sermons of many lesser known ministers, which never appeared in print. By integrating the sermons of ordinary ministers with the printed sermons of their more illustrious contemporaries, Stout reconstructs the full import of the colonial sermon as a multi-faceted institution that served both religious and political purposes, and explicated history and society to the New England Puritans for one and a half centuries.

The Puritan Tradition in America 1620 1730

... his concentration on “ non - separating Congregationalists ” as the forerunners of the New England Puritans ... in Puritan New England ( Princeton , N.J. , 1969 ) ; Emory Elliott , Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England ...

The Puritan Tradition in America  1620 1730

A classic documentary collection on New England's Puritan roots is once again available, with new material.

Female Piety in Puritan New England

Margaret Winthrop's literacy was important to John Winthrop's Puritanism because it sustained the feelings of conjugal ... See Emory Elliott, Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1975). 9.

Female Piety in Puritan New England

This treatise documents the claim that, for Puritan men and women alike, the ideals of selfhood were conveyed by female images. It argues that these images taught self-control, shaped pious ideals and established the standards against which the moral character of real women was measured.

John Eliot s Puritan Ministry to New England Indians

Puritans and Roundheads: The Harleys of Brampton Bryan and the Outbreak of the English Civil War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990. Elliott, Emory. Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England.

John Eliot s Puritan Ministry to New England  Indians

John Eliot (1604–90) has been called “the apostle to the Indians.” This book looks at Eliot not from the perspective of modern Protestant “mission” studies (the approach mainly adopted by previous research) but in the historical and theological context of seventeenth-century puritanism. Drawing on recent research on migration to New England, the book argues that Eliot, like many other migrants, went to New England primarily in search of a safe haven to practice pure reformed Christianity, not to convert Indians. Eliot’s Indian ministry started from a fundamental concern for the conversion of the unconverted, which he derived from his experience of the puritan movement in England. Consequently, for Eliot, the notion of New England Indian “mission” was essentially conversion-oriented, Word-centered, and pastorally focused, and (in common with the broader aims of New England churches) pursued a pure reformed Christianity. Eliot hoped to achieve this through the establishment of Praying Towns organized on a biblical model—where preaching, pastoral care, and the practice of piety could lead to conversion—leading to the formation of Indian churches composed of “sincere converts.”

Salvation in New England

Similarly, full sermons of the American successors of the first New England ministers are available in The Wall and ... and Emory Elliott's Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England (1975), scholars have separated sermons published ...

Salvation in New England

The sermon as crafted by the early New England preachers was the most prominent literary form of its day, yet the earliest Puritan texts have as a rule been available only in rare-book collections. This anthology of sermons of the first generation of preachers fills a serious gap in American literature. The preachers collected here, the most widely published of their time, were among the eighty or more who emigrated to Massachusetts Bay during the 1630s. They are John Cotton of Boston, Thomas Shepard of Cambridge, and Thomas Hooker of Hartford, the three foremost "lights of the western churches," and two eminent colleagues, Peter Bulkeley of Concord and John Davenport, first of New Haven and later of Boston. The selections are chosen to be representative of the lengthy works from which they are drawn, to reflect the major concerns and styles of the preachers' work as a whole, and to demonstrate the genre of the sermon as developed by the early American Puritans. Not only does this anthology represent an important contribution to literary history, but the sermons also illustrate a doctrine uniquely elaborated in this period—a consistent and emphatic narrative, mythlike in its repetition and heroics, of the progress of the soul from a state of nature to a state of salvation. This theme may be seen as a three-stage-development, although individual sermons may vary. These stages—preparation, vocation, and regeneration—determine the order of the selections. The editors' introductory material supplies a comprehensive and thorough discussion of the early New England sermons, concentrating on their role, history, structure, style, and subject matter. A separate essay on the texts of the sermons describes the relationship between the early printed versions and their form as delivered in the pulpit. The introduction preceding each selection presents original research on the historical circumstances of the preaching and publication of the work from which the sermon is drawn. The editors have also provided brief biographies of the preacfiers represented here, an annotated list of recommended background reading, and the most exhaustive checklist available of authoritative editions of the sermons of these five preachers. This book will be useful to colonial specialists as well as to students of early American literature, religion, and history. The texts are critically edited for readability, with modernized spelling and annotations of unfamiliar phrases and allusions.

Historical Dictionary of the Puritans

Light and Heat: the Puritan View of the Pulpit; and, the Focus of the Gospel in Puritan Preaching. Morgan, Pa. ... Puritan Preaching in England: A Study of Past and Present. New York: ... Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England.

Historical Dictionary of the Puritans

Members of the Church of England until the mid-16th century, the Puritans thought the Church had become too political and needed to be 'purified.' While many Puritans believed the Church was capable of reform, a large number decided that separating from the Church was their only remaining course of action. Thus the mass migration of Puritans (known as Pilgrims), to America took place. Although Puritanism died in England around 1689 and in America in 1758, Puritan beliefs, such as self-reliance, frugality, industry, and energy remain standards of the American ideal. The Historical Dictionary of Puritans tells the story of Puritanism from its origins until its eventual demise. This is done through a chronology, an introduction, a bibliography, and several hundred cross-referenced dictionary entries on important people, places, and events.

The A to Z of the Puritans

Light and Heat: the Puritan View of the Pulpit; and, the Focus of the Gospel in Puritan Preaching. Morgan, Pa. ... Puritan Preaching in England: A Study of Past and Present. New York: ... Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England.

The A to Z of the Puritans

Members of the Church of England until the mid-16th century, the Puritans thought the Church had become too political and needed to be 'purified.' While many Puritans believed the Church was capable of reform, a large number decided that separating from the Church was their only remaining course of action. Thus the mass migration of Puritans (known as Pilgrims) to America took place. Although Puritanism died in England around 1689 and in America in 1758, Puritan beliefs, such as self-reliance, frugality, industry, and energy remain standards of the American ideal. The A to Z of Puritans tells the story of Puritanism from its origins until its eventual demise. This is done through a chronology, an introduction, a bibliography, and several hundred cross-referenced dictionary entries on important people, places, and events.

The Last American Puritan

The importance of these sermons was first developed by Emory Elliott, Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1975), 133 – 134. . Increase Mather, Mystery of Christ, 139. 49. 50.

The Last American Puritan

Powerful preacher, political negotiator for New England in the halls of Parliament, president of Harvard, father of Cotton Mather, Increase Mather was the epitome of the American Puritan. He was the most important spokesman of his generation for Congregationalism and became the last American Puritan of consequence as the seventeenth century ended. The story begins in 1639 when Mather was born in the Massachusetts village of Dorchester. He left home for Harvard College when he was twelve and at twenty-two began to stir the city of Boston from the pulpit of North Church. He had written four books by the time he was thirty-two. Certain he was God’s chosen instrument and New England God’s chosen people, he disciplined mind and spirit in service to them both. Tempted to “Atheisme” and unbelief, afflicted early by nightmares and melancholy, then by hope and joy, he was a pioneer in recognizing the excitement of the new sciences and sought to reconcile them to theology. This well-wrought biography, the first of Increase Mather in forty years, draws on the extensive Mather diaries, which were transcribed by Michael Hall.

Puritan Reformed Theology

Charles L. Cohen, God's Caress: The Psychology of Puritan Religious Experience (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986); Emory Elliott, Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1975); David ...

Puritan Reformed Theology

Table of Contents: BIBLICAL STUDIES 1. The Age of the Spirit and Revival 2. Trust in the Incarnate Word 3. Our Glorious Adoption: Trinitarian-Based and Transformed Relationships 4. Paul and James: Are We Justified by Faith or by Faith and Works? 5. Gethsemane’s King-Lamb: A Sermon on John 18:7–8, 12–13a 6. The Man of Sin: 2 Thessalonians 2:1–12 7. Delighting in God: A Guide to Sabbath-Keeping SYSTEMATIC AND HISTORICAL THEOLOGY 8. God-Centered Theology in the Ministry of the Word 9. Calvin on Sovereignty, Providence, and Predestination 10. Reading the Puritans 11. Godefridus Udemans: Life, Influence, and Writings 12. John Bunyan on Justification 13. Reformed Orthodoxy in North America 14. The Perspicuity of Scripture 15. Laurence Chaderton: His Life and Ecclesiology 16. Natural Theology: Some Historical Perspective EXPERIENTIAL THEOLOGY 17. Calvin as an Experiential Preacher 18. The Puritans on Conscience and Casuistry 19. Assurance of Salvation: The Insights of Anthony Burgess 20. Wilhelmus à Brakel’s Biblical Ethics of Spirituality 21. Images of Union and Communion with Christ PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 22. Puritans on the Family: Recent Publications 23. Consider Christ in Affliction: An Open Letter to True Believers 24. Learning from the Puritans on Being Salt and Light 25. Puritans on Marital Love PASTORAL THEOLOGY AND MISSIONS 26. God-Centered Adult Education 27. Plain Preaching Demonstrating the Spirit and His Power 28. How to Evaluate Your Sermons 29. Practical Application in Preaching 30. Authentic Ministry: Servanthood, Tears, and Temptations 31. Children in the Church 32. The Minister’s Helpmeet 33. Unprofessional Puritans and Professional Pastors: What the Puritans Would Say to Modern Pastors 34. Catechism Preaching 35. A Life in the Word 36. Why You and Your Family Should Go to Church: Biblical Answers to “Churchless Christianity” CONTEMPORARY AND CULTURAL ISSUES 37. Interview with Joel Beeke about Reformed Churches and Seminaries 38. Handling Error in the Church: Martin Downes Interviewing Joel R. Beeke 39. Practical Lessons for Today from the Life of Idelette Calvin 40. Rediscovering the Laity: The Reformation in the Pew and in the Classroom 41. In Commemoration of the Heidelberg Catechism’s 450th Anniversary: The Catechism as a Confession of Faith 42. How to Battle Hostility and Secularism 43. Busy but Fruitful: How to Manage Time 44. Nurturing Intimate Communication with Your Spouse

The New England Soul

In Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England (Princeton, N.J., 1975), 88–135, Emory Elliott describes an increasingly “angry” tone in (occasional) preaching that was directed against the increasing sinfulness of the rising generation.

The New England Soul

Harry Stout's groundbreaking study of preaching in colonial New England changed the field when it first appeared in 1986. Here, twenty-five years later, is a reissue of Stout's book: a reconstruction of the full import of the colonial sermon as a multi-faceted institution that served both religious and political purposes and explained history and society to the New England Puritans for one and a half centuries.

Puritans Among the Indians

Breen , T. H. The Character of the Good Ruler : A Study of Puritan Political Ideas in New England , 1630-1730 . New Haven , 1970 . ... Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England . Princeton , N.J. , 1975 . Emerson , Everett .

Puritans Among the Indians

These eight reports by white settlers held captive by Indians gripped the imagination not only of early settlers but also of American writers through our history. Puritans among the Indians presents, in modern spelling, the best of the New England narratives. These both delineate the social and ideological struggle between the captors and the settlers, and constitute a dramatic rendition of the Puritans' spiritual struggle for redemption.

The Puritans in America

... on Puritan rationalism are Alan Simpson, Puritanism in Old and New England (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, ... and Emory Elliott, Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1975).

The Puritans in America

Exiled from England, the Puritans settled in what Cromwell called "a poor, cold, and useless" place--where they created a body of ideas and aspirations that were essential in the shaping of American religion, politics, and culture. In a felicitous blend of documents and narrative Heimert and Delbanco recapture the sweep and restless change of Puritan thought from its incipient Americanism through its dominance in New England society to its fragmentation in the face of dissent from within and without.

Pursuits of Happiness

Emory Elliott, Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England (Princeton, 1975), 8; Erikson, Wayward Puritans, 157—59, 163-81; John Demos, “Underlying Themes in the Witchcraft of Seventeenth-Century New England,”American Historical Re— ...

Pursuits of Happiness

In this book, Jack Greene reinterprets the meaning of American social development. Synthesizing literature of the previous two decades on the process of social development and the formation of American culture, he challenges the central assumptions that h

Sexual Revolution in Early America

See Emory Elliott, Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England (Princeton, N.J., 1975), chap. 3; Patricia Caldwell, The Puritan Conversion Narrative: The Beginnings of American Expression (New York, 1983), chap. 3; and David Cressy, ...

Sexual Revolution in Early America

In 1695, John Miller, a clergyman traveling through New York, found it appalling that so many couples lived together without ever being married and that no one viewed "ante-nuptial fornication" as anything scandalous or sinful. Charles Woodmason, an Anglican minister in South Carolina in 1766, described the region as a "stage of debauchery" in which polygamy was "very common," "concubinage general," and "bastardy no disrepute." These depictions of colonial North America's sexual culture sharply contradict the stereotype of Puritanical abstinence that persists in the popular imagination. In Sexual Revolution in Early America, Richard Godbeer boldly overturns conventional wisdom about the sexual values and customs of colonial Americans. His eye-opening historical account spans two centuries and most of British North America, from New England to the Caribbean, exploring the social, political, and legal dynamics that shaped a diverse sexual culture. Drawing on exhaustive research into diaries, letters, and other private papers, as well as legal records and official documents, Godbeer's absorbing narrative uncovers a persistent struggle between the moral authorities and the widespread expression of popular customs and individual urges. Godbeer begins with a discussion of the complex attitude that the Puritans had toward sexuality. For example, although believing that sex could be morally corrupting, they also considered it to be such an essential element of a healthy marriage that they excommunicated those who denied "conjugal fellowship" to their spouses. He next examines the ways in which race and class affected the debate about sexual mores, from anxieties about Anglo-Indian sexual relations to the sense of sexual entitlement that planters held over their African slaves. He concludes by detailing the fundamental shift in sexual culture during the eighteenth century towards the acceptance of a more individualistic concept of sexual desire and fulfillment. Today's moral critics, in their attempts to convince Americans of the social and spiritual consequences of unregulated sexual behavior, often harken back to a more innocent age; as this groundbreaking work makes clear, America's sexual culture has always been rich, vibrant, and contentious.

The Congregationalists

A Rational Millennium : Puritan Utopias of Seventeenth - Century England and America ( New York : Oxford University ... 1982 ) ; Emory Eliot , Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England ( Princeton : Princeton University Press , 1979 ) ...

The Congregationalists

Youngs demonstrates how the Puritan way of seeing God, humanity, and salvation has continued to influence Americans and how the unique spiritual sensibility of the early Puritans endured throughout the colonial period and long afterwards.

The Company of the Preachers

The Puritan sermon tended to be long and heavy , but it had the great advantage of being theological and doctrinal . Puritan preachers ranged over the ... Emory Elliott , Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England ( Princeton , N.J .

The Company of the Preachers

This work by a veteran pastor and professor of homiletics looks at the history of preaching from its roots in the Old Testament prophets to its continuing development in the modern era.

Tenacious of Their Liberties

See Clifford K. Shipton, "The New England Clergy of the 'Glacial Age,” Colonial Society of Massachusetts, Publications, ... See also Emory Elliot, Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England (Princeton, 1975),88-135, and Ross Beales, ...

Tenacious of Their Liberties

Although the importance of Congregationalism in early Massachusetts has engaged historians' attention for generations, this study is the first to approach the Puritan experience in Congregational church government from the perspective of both the pew and the pulpit. For the past decade, author James F. Cooper, Jr. has immersed himself in local manuscript church records. These previously untapped documents provide a fascinating glimpse of lay-clerical relations in colonial Massachusetts, and reveal that ordinary churchgoers shaped the development of Congregational practices as much as the clerical and elite personages who for so long have populated histories of this period. Cooper's new findings will both challenge existing models of church hierarchy and offer a new dimension to our understanding of the origins of New England democracy. Refuting the idea of clerical predominance in the governance of colonial Massachusetts churches, Cooper shows that the laity were both informed and empowered to rule with ministers, rather than beneath them. From the outset of the Congregational experiment, ministers articulated--and lay people embraced--principles of limited authority, higher law, and free consent in the conduct of church affairs. These principles were codified early on in the Cambridge Platform, which the laity used as their standard in resisting infringements upon their rights. By neglecting the democratic components of Congregationalism, Cooper argues, scholars have missed the larger political significance of the movement. Congregational thought and practice in fact served as one indigenous seedbed of several concepts that would later flourish during the Revolutionary generation, including the notions that government derives its legitimacy from the voluntary consent of the governed, that governors should be chosen by the governed, that rulers should be accountable to the ruled, and that constitutional checks should limit both the governors and the people. By examining the development of church government through the perspective of lay-clerical interchange, Cooper comes to a fresh understanding of the sometimes noble, sometimes sordid, and sometimes rowdy nature of church politics. His study casts new light upon Anne Hutchinson and the "Antinomian Controversy," the Cambridge Platform, the Halfway Covenant, the Reforming Synod of 1679, and the long-standing debate over Puritan "declension." Cooper argues that, in general, church government did not divide Massachusetts culture along lay-clerical lines, but instead served as a powerful component of a popular religion and an ideology whose fundamentals were shared by churchgoers and most ministers throughout much of the colonial era. His is a book that will interest students of American culture, religion, government, and history.

Providence in Early Modern England

The American Puritan Imagination : Essays in Revaluation ( Cambridge , 1974 ) , 45-55 ; Emory Elliott , Power and the Pulpit in Puritan New England ( Princeton , 1978 ) ; John F. Berens , Providence and Patriotism in Early America ...

Providence in Early Modern England

This is an extensive study of the 16th and 17th century belief that God actively intervened in human affairs to punish, reward, warn, try and chastise. It seeks to shed light on the reception, character and broader cultural repercussions of the Reformation.