The Power of Sympathy and The Coquette

Written in epistolary form and drawn from actual events, Brown’s The Power of Sympathy (1789) and Foster’s The Coquette (1797) were two of the earliest novels published in the United States.

The Power of Sympathy and The Coquette

Written in epistolary form and drawn from actual events, Brown’s The Power of Sympathy (1789) and Foster’s The Coquette (1797) were two of the earliest novels published in the United States. Both novels reflect the eighteenth-century preoccupation with the role of women as safekeepers of the young country’s morality.

The Power of Sympathy and the Coquette

Written in epistolary form and drawn from actual events, Brown’s The Power of Sympathy (1789) and Foster’s The Coquette (1797) were two of the earliest novels published in the United States.

The Power of Sympathy and the Coquette

Written in epistolary form and drawn from actual events, Brown’s The Power of Sympathy (1789) and Foster’s The Coquette (1797) were two of the earliest novels published in the United States. Both novels reflect the eighteenth-century preoccupation with the role of women as safekeepers of the young country’s morality.

Power of Sympathy and the Coquette

Written in epistolary form and drawn from actual events, The Power of Sympathy (1789) and The Coquette (1797) were two of the earliest novels published in America.

Power of Sympathy and the Coquette

Written in epistolary form and drawn from actual events, The Power of Sympathy (1789) and The Coquette (1797) were two of the earliest novels published in America. William Hill Brown's The Power of Sympathy reflects eighteenth-century America's preoccupation with the role of women as safekeepers of the country's morality. A novel about the dangers of succumbing to sexual temptations and the rewards of resistance, it was meant to promote women's moral rectitude, and the letters through which the story is told are filled with advice on the proper relationships between the sexes. Like The Power of Sympathy, Hannah Webster Foster's The Coquette is concerned with womanly virtue. Eliza Wharton is eager to enjoy a bit of freedom before settling down to domestic life and begins a flirtation with the handsome, rakish Sanford. Their letters trace their relationship from its romantic beginnings to the transgression that inevitably brings their exclusion from proper society. In her Introduction, Carla Mulford discusses the novels' importance in the development of American literature and as vivid reflections of the goal to establish a secure republic built on the virtue of its citizens.

The Power of Sympathy

The Power of Sympathy


The Power of Sympathy

The Power of Sympathy

Written in epistolary form and drawn from actual events, The Power of Sympathy (1789) and The Coquette (1797) were two of the earliest novels published in America. William Hill Brown's The Power of Sympathy reflects eighteenth-century America's preoccupation with the role of women as safekeepers of the country's morality. A novel about the dangers of succumbing to sexual temptations and the rewards of resistance, it was meant to promote women's moral rectitude, and the letters through which the story is told are filled with advice on the proper relationships between the sexes. Like The Power of Sympathy, Hannah Webster Foster's The Coquette is concerned with womanly virtue. Eliza Wharton is eager to enjoy a bit of freedom before settling down to domestic life and begins a flirtation with the handsome, rakish Sanford. Their letters trace their relationship from its romantic beginnings to the transgression that inevitably brings their exclusion from proper society. In her Introduction, Carla Mulford discusses the novels' importance in the development of American literature and as vivid reflections of the goal to establish a secure republic built on the virtue of its citizens.

The Power of Sympathy and the Coquette

However, recent criticism has suggested that these texts are not morality tales, but instead used immoral and incestuous relationships as a means to thrill readers.

The Power of Sympathy and the Coquette

American novelist William Hill Brown wrote during the eighteenth century and is credited with writing the first American novel, "The Power of Sympathy." Brown used his work to teach women the dangers of seduction and passion, attempting to lead them toward morality and propriety. The novel follows the forbidden romance of Harrington and Harriot, two young lovers who become engaged after a whirlwind romance. Much to their surprise, they discover that they are illegitimate siblings; years ago, Mr. Harrington had had an affair which resulted in Harriot's birth. The secret was kept in order to preserve the family's honor. After learning that their love is truly forbidden, Harriot dies from tuberculosis, and Harrington commits suicide after her death. In "The Coquette," Eliza Wharton begins a small relationship before getting married, which turns into an improper romance. Eventually they are banished from proper society for their sins. Both novels were created to form a foundation for the mores and virtues that many citizens wanted America to be built upon. However, recent criticism has suggested that these texts are not morality tales, but instead used immoral and incestuous relationships as a means to thrill readers. Modern readers are encouraged to judge for themselves what the author's original intention was for these dramas.

The Power of Sympathy

Written in epistolary form and drawn from actual events, The Power of Sympathy (1789) and The Coquette (1797) were two of the earliest novels published in America.

The Power of Sympathy

Written in epistolary form and drawn from actual events, The Power of Sympathy (1789) and The Coquette (1797) were two of the earliest novels published in America. William Hill Brown's The Power of Sympathy reflects eighteenth-century America's preoccupation with the role of women as safekeepers of the country's morality. A novel about the dangers of succumbing to sexual temptations and the rewards of resistance, it was meant to promote women's moral rectitude, and the letters through which the story is told are filled with advice on the proper relationships between the sexes. Like The Power of Sympathy, Hannah Webster Foster's The Coquette is concerned with womanly virtue. Eliza Wharton is eager to enjoy a bit of freedom before settling down to domestic life and begins a flirtation with the handsome, rakish Sanford. Their letters trace their relationship from its romantic beginnings to the transgression that inevitably brings their exclusion from proper society. In her Introduction, Carla Mulford discusses the novels' importance in the development of American literature and as vivid reflections of the goal to establish a secure republic built on the virtue of its citizens.

Literature American Style

Hannah Webster Foster, The Coquette, in Carla Mulford, ed., The Power of Sympathy and The Coquette (New York: Penguin, 1996), 134. 84. Tennenhouse, Importance, 45. 85. Michel Rene ́ Hilliard-d'Auberteuil, Miss McCrea: A Novel of the ...

Literature  American Style

Literature, American Style finds early U.S. authors self-consciously imitating European literary forms even as they claimed radical originality. The notion of style helped them manage this peculiar contradiction. It was their American use of style, they claimed, that marked their departure from literary precedents.

The Plight of Feeling

See Revolution and the Word, 101, and "The Power of Sympathy Reconsidered: William Hill Brown as Literary ... The Power of Sympathy; or, The Triumph of Nature, Founded on Truth, in "The Power of Sympathy" and "The Coquette," ed.

The Plight of Feeling

American novels written in the wake of the Revolution overflow with self-conscious theatricality and impassioned excess. In The Plight of Feeling, Julia A. Stern shows that these sentimental, melodramatic, and gothic works can be read as an emotional history of the early republic, reflecting the hate, anger, fear, and grief that tormented the Federalist era. Stern argues that these novels gave voice to a collective mourning over the violence of the Revolution and the foreclosure of liberty for the nation's noncitizens—women, the poor, Native and African Americans. Properly placed in the context of late eighteenth-century thought, the republican novel emerges as essentially political, offering its audience gothic and feminized counternarratives to read against the dominant male-authored accounts of national legitimation. Drawing upon insights from cultural history and gender studies as well as psychoanalytic, narrative, and genre theory, Stern convincingly exposes the foundation of the republic as an unquiet crypt housing those invisible Americans who contributed to its construction.

Death Becomes Her

Without the heroine's death, the seduction novel loses it didactic power, and, according to Bronfen, authorial power ... In The Power of Sympathy and The Coquette, both epistolary novels, Brown and Foster remove physical suffering and ...

Death Becomes Her

Dead and dying women are surely an age-old narrative trope. While associations of femininity with death have become almost prototypical in literary criticism and are familiar fodder for cultural conversations, the editors of Death Becomes Her offer us an opportunity to investigate the values that underlie such associations. But from where does our tireless investment in what constitutes a feminine death, a feminine reaction to death, and death’s courting of women emerge? These essays give voice to the idea that power and victimization are not opposites, but rather are complements in an operatic fantasy of intrigue, agency, absence and presence that pervades American writing and experience. Each chapter of Death Becomes Her offers a different lens to investigate the nature of death as surely more than just an anatomical matter: The penny press obsessively covers the death of a beautiful prostitute in 1840s Chicago; a novel of seduction becomes also a narrative of autopsy; a story of haunting allows women outlets for sexual license and the polemics of desire. Overall this volume invites readers to explore the ways in which death is portrayed as both an ornamentation of femininity and an ontological reality of it: how, put simply, “death becomes her.” Essays include analyses of women’s deathbed scenes, suicides, murders, funerals, and autopsies in literature and other nineteenth-century media. As such, the chapters in Death Becomes Her show how the authorial and readerly interest in scripting and staging women’s deaths is both intricate and abiding. They tell us that death is never, of course, simply about death, and they make relevant other issues, from linguistics to politics, as they inform the literature and lives of women from the late-eighteenth to early twentieth-century America. Taken together, the pieces in Death Becomes Her allow us greater access to the surrounding culture out of which the American woman emerges, performs, lives and dies. In doing so, they offer fresh insight into the often unsettling and highly relevant role of death in feminism.

Transamerican Sentimentalism and Nineteenth Century US Literary History

Founded in Truth , in The Power of Sympathy and The Coquette ( New York : Penguin Books , 1996 ) , 69 . 6. Hannah Webster Foster , The Coquette ; Or , The History of Eliza Wharton ; A Novel ; Founded on Fact , ed .

Transamerican Sentimentalism and Nineteenth Century US Literary History

Sentimentalism is usually studied through US-British relations after the American Revolution or in connection to national reforms like the abolitionist movement. Transamerican Sentimentalism and Nineteenth-Century US Literary History instead argues that African American, Native American, Latinx, and Anglo American women writers also used sentimentalism to construct narratives that reframed or countered the violence dominating the nineteenth-century Americas, including the Haitian Revolution, Indian Removal, the US-Mexican War, and Cuba's independence wars. By tracking the transformation of sentimentalism as the US reacted to, enacted, and intervened in conflict Transamerican Sentimentalism and Nineteenth-Century US Literary History demonstrates how marginalized writers negotiated hemispheric encounters amidst the gendered, racialized, and cultural violence of the nineteenth-century Americas. It remaps sentiment's familiar transatlantic and national scholarly frameworks through authors such as Leonora Sansay and Mary Peabody Mann, and considers how authors including John Rollin Ridge, John S. and Harriet Jacobs, María Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Victor Séjour, and Martin R. Delany adapted the mode. Transamerican sentimentalism cannot unseat the violence of the nineteenth-century Americas, but it does produce other potential outcomes-including new paradigms for understanding the coquette, a locally successful informal diplomacy, and motivations for violent slave revolt. Such transformations mark not sentiment's failures or distortions, but its adaptive attempts to survive and thrive.

LITERATURE GENDER SPACE

THE POWER OF SYMPATHY AND THE COQUETTE : Two VERSIONS OF THE SAME Tale ? Despite the critical opinions about sentimental fiction as formula literature , I wish to contend here that the deployment of sentimental fiction reached three ...

LITERATURE  GENDER  SPACE

Perhaps the most serious challenge that the present volume offers to the latest literature on the tapie is the reflection on gender, space and literature from the perspective of masculinity, a position which has been no doubt neglected by many years of feminist debate concentrating on women's positions and circumstances. This is specifically one of the novelties that the Intemational Conference on Gendered Spaces, celebrated in May 2001 at the University of Huelva, from which this work springs, introduced. The articles collected here constitute a selection of the most relevant contributions made at this Conference.

The Cambridge History of the American Novel

It is no coincidence that the first American seduction novel (William Hill Brown's The Power of Sympathy) and the ... Charlotte Temple and The Coquette were published when both the USA and England were experiencing the first wave of ...

The Cambridge History of the American Novel

This ambitious literary history traces the American novel from its emergence in the late eighteenth century to its diverse incarnations in the multi-ethnic, multi-media culture of the present day. In a set of original essays by renowned scholars from all over the world, the volume extends important critical debates and frames new ones. Offering new views of American classics, it also breaks new ground to show the role of popular genres - such as science fiction and mystery novels - in the creation of the literary tradition. One of the original features of this book is the dialogue between the essays, highlighting cross-currents between authors and their works as well as across historical periods. While offering a narrative of the development of the genre, the History reflects the multiple methodologies that have informed readings of the American novel and will change the way scholars and readers think about American literary history.

Credulity

William Hill Brown, The Power of Sympathy, in “The Power of Sympathy” and “The Coquette,” ed. Carla Mulford (New York: Penguin, 1996), 53. 129. Ibid., 95. 130. Ibid., 10. 131. Ibid., 29; Susanna Rowson, Charlotte Temple, in “Charlotte ...

Credulity

From the 1830s to the Civil War, Americans could be found putting each other into trances for fun and profit in parlors, on stage, and in medical consulting rooms. They were performing mesmerism. Surprisingly central to literature and culture of the period, mesmerism embraced a variety of phenomena, including mind control, spirit travel, and clairvoyance. Although it had been debunked by Benjamin Franklin in late eighteenth-century France, the practice nonetheless enjoyed a decades-long resurgence in the United States. Emily Ogden here offers the first comprehensive account of those boom years. Credulity tells the fascinating story of mesmerism’s spread from the plantations of the French Antilles to the textile factory cities of 1830s New England. As it proliferated along the Eastern seaboard, this occult movement attracted attention from Ralph Waldo Emerson’s circle and ignited the nineteenth-century equivalent of flame wars in the major newspapers. But mesmerism was not simply the last gasp of magic in modern times. Far from being magicians themselves, mesmerists claimed to provide the first rational means of manipulating the credulous human tendencies that had underwritten past superstitions. Now, rather than propping up the powers of oracles and false gods, these tendencies served modern ends such as labor supervision, education, and mediated communication. Neither an atavistic throwback nor a radical alternative, mesmerism was part and parcel of the modern. Credulity offers us a new way of understanding the place of enchantment in secularizing America.

The Coquette and The Boarding School

... the novel was still a new form for American authors, even though Americans had been reading imported novels for decades.13 William Hill Brown's The Power of Sympathy, published in 1789, is often cited as the first American novel, ...

The Coquette and The Boarding School

Hannah Webster Foster based The Coquette on the true story of Elizabeth Whitman, an unmarried woman who died in childbirth in New England. Fictionalizing Whitman’s experiences in her heroine, Eliza Wharton, Foster created a compelling narrative of seduction that was hugely successful with readers. The Boarding School, a less widely known work by Foster, is an experimental text, part epistolary novel and part conduct book. Together, the novels explore the realities of women’s lives in early America. The critical introduction and appendices to this edition, which explore female friendship and the education of women in the novels, frame Foster as more than a purveyor of the sentimental novel, and re-evaluate her placement in American literary history.

Grief and Genre in American Literature 1790 1870

... and should be, mourned. in The Power of Sympathy, Charlotte Temple, and The Coquette, mourning for the fallen heroine is modeled by her surviving friends and family. the heroine's death at the conclusion of the novel requires the ...

Grief and Genre in American Literature  1790   1870

Focusing on the role of genre in the formation of dominant conceptions of death and dying, Desirée Henderson examines literary texts and social spaces devoted to death and mourning in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century America. Henderson shows how William Hill Brown, Susanna Rowson, and Hannah Webster borrowed from and challenged funeral sermon conventions in their novelistic portrayals of the deaths of fallen women; contrasts the eulogies for George Washington with William Apess's "Eulogy for King Philip" to expose conflicts between national ideology and indigenous history; examines Frederick Douglass's use of the slave cemetery to represent the costs of slavery for African American families; suggests that the ideas about democracy materialized in Civil War cemeteries and monuments influenced Walt Whitman's war elegies; and offers new contexts for analyzing Elizabeth Stuart Phelps's The Gates Ajar and Emily Dickinson's poetry as works that explore the consequences of female writers claiming authority over the mourning process. Informed by extensive archival research, Henderson's study eloquently speaks to the ways in which authors adopted, revised, or rejected the conventions of memorial literature, choices that disclose their location within decisive debates about appropriate gender roles and sexual practices, national identity and citizenship, the consequences of slavery, the nature of democratic representation, and structures of authorship and literary authority.

Intricate Relations

Gustafson, Eloquence is Power: Oratory and Performance in Early America, 169–70; for a discussion of Gannett's exceptionalism, see 246–57. 50. ... Carla Mulford, Introduction, The Power of Sympathy and The Coquette, ed.

Intricate Relations

Intricate Relations charts the development of the novel in and beyond the early republic in relation to these two thematic and intricately connected centers: sexuality and economics. By reading fiction written by Americans between 1789 and 1814 alongside medical theory, political and economic tracts, and pedagogical literature of all kinds, Karen Weyler recreates and illuminates the larger, sometimes opaque, cultural context in which novels were written, published, and read. In 1799, the novelist Charles Brockden Brown used the evocative phrase “intricate relations” to describe the complex imbrication of sexual and economic relations in the early republic. Exploring these relationships, he argued, is the chief job of the “moral historian,” a label that most novelists of the era embraced. In a republic anxious about burgeoning individualism in the 1790s and the first two decades of the nineteenth century, the novel foregrounded sexual and economic desires and explored ways to regulate the manner in which they were expressed and gratified. In Intricate Relations, Weyler argues that understanding how these issues underlie the novel as a genre is fundamental to understanding both the novels themselves and their role in American literary culture. Situating fiction amid other popular genres illuminates how novelists such as Charles Brockden Brown, Hannah Foster, Samuel Relf, Susanna Rowson, Rebecca Rush, and Sally Wood synthesized and iterated many of the concerns expressed in other forms of public discourse, a strategy that helped legitimate their chosen genre and make it a viable venue for discussion in the decades following the revolution. Weyler’s passionate and persuasive study offers new insights into the civic role of fiction in the early republic and will be of great interest to literary theorists and scholars in women’s and American studies.

The History of Reading

William Hill Brown, The Power of Sympathy, or, the Triumph of Nature Founded in Truth, 2 vols (Boston: Isaiah Thomas, 1789), II, ... Coquette, ed. Carla Mulford (New York: Penguin, 1996), p. 40. Hugh Henry Brackenridge, Modern Chivalry: ...

The History of Reading

Bringing together research from a variety of countries and periods, this volume introduces readers to the diverse approaches used to recover the evidence of reading through history in different societies, and asks whether reading practices are always conditioned by specific local circumstances or whether broader patterns might emerge.

Intimacy and Family in Early American Writing

As we shall see in examining The Power of Sympathy and The Coquette, these terms are invoked repeatedly, as subject or as mode, in ways that shed some light on forms of intimacy—forms perhaps not strictly separable from sentiment and ...

Intimacy and Family in Early American Writing

Through the prism of intimacy, Burleigh sheds light on eighteenth and early-nineteenth-century American texts. This insightful study shows how the trope of the family recurred to produce contradictory images - both intimately familiar and frighteningly alienating - through which Americans responded to upheavals in their cultural landscape.