Precedent in the United States Supreme Court

This volume presents a variety of both normative and descriptive perspectives on the use of precedent by the United States Supreme Court.

Precedent in the United States Supreme Court

This volume presents a variety of both normative and descriptive perspectives on the use of precedent by the United States Supreme Court. It brings together a diverse group of American legal scholars, some of whom have been influenced by the Segal/Spaeth "attitudinal" model and some of whom have not. The group of contributors includes legal theorists and empiricists, constitutional lawyers and legal generalists, leading authorities and up-and-coming scholars. The book addresses questions such as how the Court establishes durable precedent, how the Court decides to overrule precedent, the effects of precedent on case selection, the scope of constitutional precedent, the influence of concurrences and dissents, and the normative foundations of constitutional precedent. Most of these questions have been addressed by the Court itself only obliquely, if at all. The volume will be valuable to readers both in the United States and abroad, particularly in light of ongoing debates over the role of precedent in civil-law nations and emerging legal systems.

The Supreme Court Compendium

With over 180 tables and figures, this new edition is intended to capture the full retrospective picture through the 2013-2014 term of the Roberts Court and the momentous decisions handed down within the last four years, including United ...

The Supreme Court Compendium

The Supreme Court Compendium provides historical and statistical information on the Supreme Court: its institutional development; caseload; decision trends; the background, nomination, and voting behavior of its justices; its relationship with public, governmental, and other judicial bodies; and its impact. With over 180 tables and figures, this new edition is intended to capture the full retrospective picture through the 2013-2014 term of the Roberts Court and the momentous decisions handed down within the last four years, including United States v. Windsor, National Federation of Independent Business v. Sebelius, and Shelby County v. Holder.

Rethinking Decisions

Rethinking Decisions


The Solicitor General and the United States Supreme Court

This book examines whether and how the Office of the Solicitor General influences the United States Supreme Court.

The Solicitor General and the United States Supreme Court

The United States government, represented by the Office of the Solicitor General, appears before the Supreme Court more than any other litigant. The Office's link to the president, the arguments it makes before the Court, and its ability to alter the legal and policy landscape make it the most important Supreme Court litigant bar none. As such, scholars must understand the Office's role in Supreme Court decision making and, more importantly, its ability to influence the Court. This book examines whether and how the Office of the Solicitor General influences the United States Supreme Court. Combining archival data with recent innovations in the areas of matching and causal inference, the book finds that the Solicitor General influences every aspect of the Court's decision making process. From granting review to cases, selecting winning parties, writing opinions, and interpreting precedent, the Solicitor General's office influences the Court to behave in ways it otherwise would not.

First Among Equals

In First Among Equals Ken Starr traces the evolution of the Supreme Court from its beginnings, examines major Court decisions of the past three decades, and uncovers the sometimes surprising continuity between the precedent-shattering ...

First Among Equals

Today's United States Supreme Court consists of nine intriguingly varied justices and one overwhelming contradiction: Compared to its revolutionary predecessor, the Rehnquist Court appears deceptively passive, yet it stands as dramatically ready to defy convention as the Warren Court of the 1950s and 60s. Now Kenneth W. Starr-who served as clerk for one chief justice, argued twenty-five cases as solicitor general before the Supreme Court, and is widely regarded as one of the nation's most distinguished practitioners of constitutional law-offers us an incisive and unprecedented look at the paradoxes, the power, and the people of the highest court in the land. In First Among Equals Ken Starr traces the evolution of the Supreme Court from its beginnings, examines major Court decisions of the past three decades, and uncovers the sometimes surprising continuity between the precedent-shattering Warren Court and its successors under Burger and Rehnquist. He shows us, as no other author ever has, the very human justices who shape our law, from Sandra Day O'Connor, the Court's most pivotal-and perhaps most powerful-player, to Clarence Thomas, its most original thinker. And he explores the present Court's evolution into a lawyerly tribunal dedicated to balance and consensus on the one hand, and zealous debate on hotly contested issues of social policy on the other. On race, the Court overturned affirmative action and held firm to an undeviating color-blind standard. On executive privilege, the Court rebuffed three presidents, both Republican and Democrat, who fought to increase their power at the expense of rival branches of government. On the 2000 presidential election, the Court prevented what it deemed a runaway Florida court from riding roughshod over state law-illustrating how in our system of government, the Supreme Court is truly the first among equals. Compelling and supremely readable, First Among Equals sheds new light on the most frequently misunderstood legal pillar of American life.

The United States Supreme Court and Politics

While common-sense attitudes towards the United States Supreme Court have been focused on what decisions they are likely to make, this book aims to focus on the impacts of other politicized elements of the Court.

The United States Supreme Court and Politics

While common-sense attitudes towards the United States Supreme Court have been focused on what decisions they are likely to make, this book aims to focus on the impacts of other politicized elements of the Court. Through statistical modeling and other quantitative analyses, Justin DePlato examines the ability of the presidency and the Senate to influence and shape policy through the Court’s nomination process, docket selection, and judicial retirements. The Court operating as a political institution threatens to affect, where it hasn’t already outright intervened, civil liberties and social issues in the modern era and represents a controversial mechanic in the workings of American statecraft.

Inconsistency and Indecision in the United States Supreme Court

More broadly, any understanding of the Court's role in American society should arguably include an understanding of which precedents exert the most legal ...

Inconsistency and Indecision in the United States Supreme Court

The Supreme Court cannot be both efficient and consistent, and thus fails in its Constitutional mandate

The Politics of Precedent on the U S Supreme Court

Felix (1992) positively interprets United States v. ... indicating the Court's decreasing propensity to positively interpret precedents with which they ...

The Politics of Precedent on the U S  Supreme Court

The Politics of Precedent on the U.S. Supreme Court offers an insightful and provocative analysis of the Supreme Court's most important task--shaping the law. Thomas Hansford and James Spriggs analyze a key aspect of legal change: the Court's interpretation or treatment of the precedents it has set in the past. Court decisions do not just resolve immediate disputes; they also set broader precedent. The meaning and scope of a precedent, however, can change significantly as the Court revisits it in future cases. The authors contend that these interpretations are driven by an interaction between policy goals and variations in the legal authoritativeness of precedent. From this premise, they build an explanation of the legal interpretation of precedent that yields novel predictions about the nature and timing of legal change. Hansford and Spriggs test their hypotheses by examining how the Court has interpreted the precedents it set between 1946 and 1999. This analysis provides compelling support for their argument, and demonstrates that the justices' ideological goals and the role of precedent are inextricably linked. The two prevailing, yet contradictory, views of precedent--that it acts either solely as a constraint, or as a "cloak" that never actually influences the Court--are incorrect. This book shows that while precedent can operate as a constraint on the justices' decisions, it also represents an opportunity to foster preferred societal outcomes.

SCOTUS 2018

This inaugural volume in Palgrave’s new SCOTUS series describes, explains, and contextualizes the landmark cases of the US Supreme Court in the term ending in 2018, covering issues such as gay rights, religious liberty, public sector ...

SCOTUS 2018

Each year, the Supreme Court of the United States announces new rulings with deep consequences for our lives. This inaugural volume in Palgrave’s new SCOTUS series describes, explains, and contextualizes the landmark cases of the US Supreme Court in the term ending in 2018, covering issues such as gay rights, religious liberty, public sector unions, coerced speech, digital privacy, voting rights, and the Trump travel ban. Bringing together notable scholars of the Court in one volume, the chapters in Scotus 2018 present the details of each ruling in its specific case, its meaning for constitutional debate, and its impact on public policy or partisan politics. Finally, SCOTUS 2018 offers a big-picture look at Justice Neil Gorsuch’s first full term in office, the legal and political legacy of former Justice Anthony Kennedy, and the controversial nomination and confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Without Precedent

D.C. This is the astonishing true story of how a rough-cut frontiersman - born in Virginia in 1755 and with little formal education - invented himself as one of the nation's preeminent lawyers and politicians who then reinvented the ...

Without Precedent

The remarkable story of John Marshall who, as chief justice, statesman, and diplomat, played a pivotal role in the founding of the United States. No member of America's Founding Generation had a greater impact on the Constitution and the Supreme Court than John Marshall, and no one did more to preserve the delicate unity of the fledgling United States. From the nation's founding in 1776 and for the next forty years, Marshall was at the center of every political battle. As Chief Justice of the United States - the longest-serving in history - he established the independence of the judiciary and the supremacy of the federal Constitution and courts. As the leading Federalist in Virginia, he rivaled his cousin Thomas Jefferson in influence. As a diplomat and secretary of state, he defended American sovereignty against France and Britain, counseled President John Adams, and supervised the construction of the city of Washington. D.C. This is the astonishing true story of how a rough-cut frontiersman - born in Virginia in 1755 and with little formal education - invented himself as one of the nation's preeminent lawyers and politicians who then reinvented the Constitution to forge a stronger nation. Without Precedent is the engrossing account of the life and times of this exceptional man, who with cunning, imagination, and grace shaped America's future as he held together the Supreme Court, the Constitution, and the country itself.

The Judge in a Democracy

"This book offers a plethora of intriguing examples of practical reason in the service of an eclectic mix of justice ethically conceived and of law as a body of rules and principles that bind us even when power is lacking to enforce those ...

The Judge in a Democracy

'focus[es] mainly on courts of legal systems that belong to the common law family, such as the United States, England, Canada, Australia, and a number of mixed jurisdictions, such as South Africa, Scotland, Cyorus and Israel ... [it] also applies substantially to other legal systems, such as the Roman-Germanic family, inlcuding France, Italy, Germany, Austria and the family of Scandinavian systems ... [it] is also alid for legal systems that have emerged from the family of socialist systems, such as Russia, Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic.' --p. xvii.

Judicial Politics in the United States

Not only does this book cover the nuts and bolts of the functions, structures and processes of our courts and legal system, it goes beyond other judicial process books by exploring how the courts interact with executives, legislatures, and ...

Judicial Politics in the United States

Judicial Politics in the United States examines the role of courts as policymaking institutions and their interactions with the other branches of government and other political actors in the U.S. political system. Not only does this book cover the nuts and bolts of the functions, structures and processes of our courts and legal system, it goes beyond other judicial process books by exploring how the courts interact with executives, legislatures, and state and federal bureaucracies. It also includes a chapter devoted to the courts' interactions with interest groups, the media, and general public opinion and a chapter that looks at how American courts and judges interact with other judiciaries around the world. Judicial Politics in the United States balances coverage of judicial processes with discussions of the courts' interactions with our larger political universe, making it an essential text for students of judicial politics.

The Pursuit of Justice

Reviews and discusses landmark cases heard by the United States Supreme court from 1803 through 2000.

The Pursuit of Justice

Reviews and discusses landmark cases heard by the United States Supreme court from 1803 through 2000.

Records and Briefs of the United States Supreme Court

ion has elicited new doctrines , subversive of former safe precedent . Cases may exist , also , when a cause is got up in a State court for the very purpose ...

Records and Briefs of the United States Supreme Court