Pretending to Communicate

Pretending to Communicate


Language Typology and Language Universals

Pretending to communicate. Berlin & New York: de Gruyter, 33 47. ... Heidelberg: Winter. Raible, Wolfgang. 1994. „Orality 60 II: Foundations: Points of contact between language universals/language typology and other disciplines.

Language Typology and Language Universals

This series of HANDBOOKS OF LINGUISTICS AND COMMUNICATION SCIENCE is designed to illuminate a field which not only includes general linguistics and the study of linguistics as applied to specific languages, but also covers those more recent areas which have developed from the increasing body of research into the manifold forms of communicative action and interaction. For "classic" linguistics there appears to be a need for a review of the state of the art which will provide a reference base for the rapid advances in research undertaken from a variety of theoretical standpoints, while in the more recent branches of communication science the handbooks will give researchers both an verview and orientation. To attain these objectives, the series will aim for a standard comparable to that of the leading handbooks in other disciplines, and to this end will strive for comprehensiveness, theoretical explicitness, reliable documentation of data and findings, and up-to-date methodology. The editors, both of the series and of the individual volumes, and the individual contributors, are committed to this aim. The languages of publication are English, German, and French. The main aim of the series is to provide an appropriate account of the state of the art in the various areas of linguistics and communication science covered by each of the various handbooks; however no inflexible pre-set limits will be imposed on the scope of each volume. The series is open-ended, and can thus take account of further developments in the field. This conception, coupled with the necessity of allowing adequate time for each volume to be prepared with the necessary care, means that there is no set time-table for the publication of the whole series. Each volume will be a self-contained work, complete in itself. The order in which the handbooks are published does not imply any rank ordering, but is determined by the way in which the series is organized; the editor of the whole series enlist a competent editor for each individual volume. Once the principal editor for a volume has been found, he or she then has a completely free hand in the choice of co-editors and contributors. The editors plan each volume independently of the others, being governed only by general formal principles. The series editor only intervene where questions of delineation between individual volumes are concerned. It is felt that this (modus operandi) is best suited to achieving the objectives of the series, namely to give a competent account of the present state of knowledge and of the perception of the problems in the area covered by each volume.

Pretending and Meaning

5 PRETENDING TO MEAN SAYING AND IMPLICATING Chapter 4 examined the ways in which pretending prohibits serious communication and the full success of a speaker's communicative act . As we outlined the various threats , we emphasized that ...

Pretending and Meaning

This highly original investigation into fictional discourse addresses the question: How is it possible for fiction writers to mean something serious? Drawing upon Paul Grice's interrogation of meaning and implicature, Henry offers a systematic correlation between what it is to pretend and what it is to mean.

Semiotica

Berlin New York G . Pretending to Communicate Edited by Herman Parret 1994. 23,0 x 15,5 cm . XV , 304 pages . Cloth DM 178 , - / ÖS 1.389 , - / sFr 171 ,ISBN 3-11-011832-7 ( Grundlagen der Kommunikation und Kognition / Foundations of ...

Semiotica


Seduction Community Speech

(Editor) Pretending to Communicate [Foundations of Communication and Cognition]. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter. In French (and German) [27] [28] 1972 1975 “Nouvelles contributions au débat de l'empirisme et du rationalisme en théorie ...

Seduction  Community  Speech

This volume unites various contributions reflecting the intellectual interests exhibited by Professor Herman Parret (Institute of Philosophy, Leuven), who has continued to observe, and often critically assess, ongoing developments in pragmatics throughout his career. In fact, Parret’s contributions to philosophical and empirical/linguistic pragmatics present substantive proposals in the epistemics of communication, while simultaneously offering meta-comments on the ideological premises of extant pragmatic analyses. In a lengthy introduction, an overview is provided of his achievements in promoting an integrated, “maximalist” pragmatics, as well as of the links between his own work in philosophy of language and in semiotics and aesthetics. The remaining 12 essays address relevant pragmatic themes or look into the relation between pragmatics and neighboring disciplines. They deal with grammatical deixis (Brisard, Ikegami) and mood (van der Auwera & Schalley), performativity (Harnish, Holdcroft), speech-act types and their praxeological dimensions (Roulet, Van Overbeke), Wittgensteinian language games (Marques, Parisi), cultural and intercultural identities (Vandenabeele, Verschueren), and the visual arts (Wildgen).

This Obscure Thing Called Transparency

6 The contents of sections 2 and 3 reiterate some elements of my paper: Herman Parret, “Indirection, Manipulation and Seduction in Discourse,” in Pretending to Communicate, ed. Herman Parret, Foundations of Communication and Cognition, ...

This Obscure Thing Called Transparency

The paradoxical logic of transparency and mediation Transparency is the metaphor of our time. Whether in government or corporate governance, finance, technology, health or the media – it is ubiquitous today, and there is hardly a current debate that does not call for more transparency. But what does this word actually stand for and what are the consequences for the life of individuals? Can knowledge from the arts, and its play of visibility and invisibility, tell us something about the paradoxical logics of transparency and mediation? This Obscure Thing Called Transparency gathers contributions by international experts who critically assess the promises and perils of transparency today.

The Dynamics of Interactional Humor

Why pretend? In Shaun Nichols (Ed.), The architecture of imagination (pp. 8–109). Oxford: Oxford University Press. ... Lying as pretending to give information. In Herman Parret (Ed.), Pretending to communicate (pp. 276–291).

The Dynamics of Interactional Humor

This book deals with the construction of diverse forms of humor in everyday oral, written, and mediatized interactions. It sheds light on the differences and, most importantly, the similarities in the production of interactional humor in face-to-face and various technology-mediated forms of communication, including scripted and non-scripted situations. The chapters analyze humor-related issues in such genres as spontaneous conversations, broadcast dialogues, storytelling, media blogs, bilingual conversations, stand-up comedy, TV documentaries, drama series, family sitcoms, Facebook posts, and internet memes. The individual authors trace how speakers collaboratively circulate, reconstruct, and (re)frame either personal or public accounts of reality, aiming –among other things– to produce and/or reproduce humor. Rather than being “finished” products with a “single” interpretation, humorous texts are thus approached as dynamic communicative events that give rise to diverse interpretations and meanings. The book draws on a variety of up-to-date approaches and methodologies, and will appeal to scholars in discourse analysis, conversation analysis, interactional sociolinguistics, pragmatics, ethnography of communication, and social semiotics.

An Integrated Play based Curriculum for Young Children

Itis assumed that the relationship of pretend play contributes to socialunderstanding. Pretense playobviously requirestheuse of mental representations. Whenchildren pretend, they communicate their internal,mental representation ...

An Integrated Play based Curriculum for Young Children

Play provides young children with the opportunity to express their ideas, symbolize, and test their knowledge of the world. It provides the basis for inquiry in literacy, science, social studies, mathematics, art, music, and movement. Through play, young children become active learners engaged in explorations about themselves, their community, and their personal-social world. An Integrated Play-Based Curriculum for Young Children offers the theoretical framework for understanding the origins of an early childhood play-based curriculum and how young children learn and understand concepts in a social and physical environment. Distinguished author Olivia N. Saracho then explores how play fits into various curriculum areas in order to help teachers develop their early childhood curriculum using developmentally and culturally appropriate practice. Through this integrated approach, young children are able to actively engage in meaningful and functional experiences in their natural context. Special Features Include: Vignettes of children’s conversations and actions in the classroom Suggestions for activities and classroom materials Practical examples and guidelines End-of-chapter summaries to enhance and extend the reader’s understanding of young children By presenting appropriate theoretical practices for designing and implementing a play-based curriculum, An Integrated Play-Based Curriculum for Young Children offers pre-service teachers the foundational knowledge about the field, about the work that practitioners do with young children, and how to best assume a teacher’s role effectively.

Pretend Play as Improvisation

St Berndt, 1977; Garvey & Kramer, 1989) is perhaps most responsible for the recent focus in psychology on metacommunication during pretend play. She defined play metacommunication to be the regulatory actions children perform during ...

Pretend Play as Improvisation

Everyday conversations including gossip, boasting, flirting, teasing, and informative discussions are highly creative, improvised interactions. Children's play is also an important, often improvisational activity. One of the most improvisational games among 3- to 5-year-old children is social pretend play--also called fantasy play, sociodramatic play, or role play. Children's imaginations have free reign during pretend play. Conversations in these play episodes are far more improvisational than the average adult conversation. Because pretend play occurs in a dramatized, fantasy world, it is less constrained by social and physical reality. This book adds to our understanding of preschoolers' pretend play by examining it in the context of a theory of improvisational performance genres. This theory, derived from in-depth analyses of the implicit and explicit rules of theatrical improvisation, proves to generalize to pretend play as well. The two genres share several characteristics: * There is no script; they are created in the moment. * There are loose outlines of structure which guide the performance. * They are collective; no one person decides what will happen. Because group improvisational genres are collective and unscripted, improvisational creativity is a collective social process. The pretend play literature states that this improvisational behavior is most prevalent during the same years that many other social and cognitive skills are developing. Children between the ages of 3 and 5 begin to develop representations of their own and others' mental states as well as learn to represent and construct narratives. Freudian psychologists and other personality theorists have identified these years as critical in the development of the personality. The author believes that if we can demonstrate that children's improvisational abilities develop during these years--and that their fantasy improvisations become more complex and creative--it might suggest that these social skills are linked to the child's developing ability to improvise with other creative performers.

AI IA 2001 Advances in Artificial Intelligence

1. Ballim, A., Wilks, Y.: Beliefs, stereotypes ad dynamic agent modeling. User Modeling and User-Adapted Interaction, 1, 1, 1991. 2. Castelfranchi, C., Poggi, I.: Lying as pretending to give information. Pretending to Communicate.

AI IA 2001  Advances in Artificial Intelligence

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the scientific track of the 7th Congress of the Italian Association for Artificial Intelligence, AI*IA 2001, held in Bari, Italy, in September 2001. The 25 revised long papers and 16 revised short papers were carefully reviewed and selected for inclusion in the volume. The papers are organized in topical sections on machine learning; automated reasoning; knowledge representation; multi-agent systems; natural language processing; perception, vision, and robotics; and planning and scheduling.

Pragmatics

The final part is called “ Ways and forces of pretending to communicate , ' . The papers in this part are written by Herman Parret , Haruhiko Yamaguchi , Jocelyne Vincent Marrelli , Cristiano Castelfranchi and Isabella Poggi , and Anne ...

Pragmatics


Resources in Education

Identifiers - Dyadic Communication , * Pretend Play In this paper , the authors systemize the complex phenomenon known ... The authors present data on the techniques used by the children to communicate pretending and the organization of ...

Resources in Education


Cognitive Linguistics

Pretending to Communicate Edited by Herman Parret 1994. 23,0 x 15,5 cm . XV , 304 pages . Cloth DM 178 , - / ÖS 1.389 , - / sFr 171 , - ISBN 3-11-011832-7 ( Grundlagen der Kommunikation und Kognition / Foundations of Communication and ...

Cognitive Linguistics


Play Learning

Through pretend play, young children can express and communicate their emerging concerns and interpretations of the social and cultural world. Children's pretend play also allows adults to learn about children.

Play   Learning

In Play=Learning, top experts in child development and learning contend that in over-emphasizing academic achievement, our culture has forgotten about the importance of play for children's development.

Human Sexuality

Is it because the other person is bolstering my ego by communicating desire (Nagel)? Is it because the other is ... is defined as a misuse of the body language of sexuality (e.g., pretending to communicate love when there is none).

Human Sexuality

First Published in 1994. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Theory of Cryptography

and Hellman [15] who considered a passive adversary that can eavesdrop on the honest parties' communication, ... Otherwise, there is nothing preventing an adversary from pretending to be Bob while communicating with Alice (and vice ...

Theory of Cryptography

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the Fifth Theory of Cryptography Conference, TCC 2008. It covers the paradigms, approaches and techniques used to conceptualize, define and provide solutions to natural cryptographic problems.

Pretending at Home

Traces the development of pretend play in nine children growing up in educated, middle-class European American families.

Pretending at Home

Traces the development of pretend play in nine children growing up in educated, middle-class European American families. Illuminates how pretend play is embedded in distinct sociocultural contexts: physical and social ecologies, social and communicative conventions, and a broad system of belief. Paper edition (unseen), $12.95. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Pretending and Meaning

Helen B. Schwartzman has noted the power of pretending and play in the development of social status in her essay " Play and ... She emphasizes the communicative function : For example , a child ( Linda ) must be able to communicate to ...

Pretending and Meaning


Context in Communication A Cognitive View

The assertion in this case is merely pretend, which is why we would not complain that it cannot be true or impart knowledge by its including an empty name. The speaker, the fiction-maker, is using the sentence to make a different speech ...

Context in Communication  A Cognitive View

Context is what contributes to interpret a communicative act beyond the spoken words. It provides information essential to clarify the intentions of a speaker, and thus to identify the actual meaning of an utterance. A large amount of research in Pragmatics has shown how wide-ranging and multifaceted this concept can be. Context spans from the preceding words in a conversation to the general knowledge that the interlocutors supposedly share, from the perceived environment to features and traits that the participants in a dialogue attribute to each other. This last category is also very broad, since it includes mental and emotional states, together with culturally constructed knowledge, such as the reciprocal identification of social roles and positions. The assumption of a cognitive point of view brings to the foreground a number of new questions regarding how information about the context is organized in the mind and how this kind of knowledge is used in specific communicative situations. A related, very important question concerns the role played in this process by theory of mind abilities (ToM), both in typical and atypical populations. In this Research Topic, we bring together articles that address different aspects of context analysis from theoretical and empirical perspectives, integrating knowledge and methods derived from Philosophy of language, Linguistics, Cognitive Science, Cognitive Neuroscience, Developmental and Clinical Psychology.

Communication Skills

and you reply “ Please use only necessary words ” , they will think you are pretending to be a robot . Much communication does not involve words at all . Gestures , posture , facial expression and tone of voice can communicate a great ...

Communication Skills

Rev. ed. of: Communication for engineering students / John W. Davies. 2nd ed. 1996.