Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung

As Greil Marcus writes in his introduction, 'What this book demands from a reader is a willingness to accept that the best writer in America could write almost nothing but record reviews.'

Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung

Until his death aged thirty-three in 1982, Lester Bangs wrote wired, rock 'n' roll pieces on Iggy Pop, The Clash, John Lennon, Kraftwerk, Lou Reed. As a rock critic, he had an eagle-eye for distinguishing the pre-packaged imitation from the real thing; written in a conversational, wisecracking, erotically charged style, his hallucinatory hagiographies and excoriating take-downs reveal an iconoclast unafraid to tell it like it is. To his journalism he brought the talent of a great a renegade Beat poet, and his essays, reviews and scattered notes convey the electric thrill of a music junky indulging the habit of a lifetime. As Greil Marcus writes in his introduction, 'What this book demands from a reader is a willingness to accept that the best writer in America could write almost nothing but record reviews.'

Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung

Vintage presents the paperback edition of the wild and brilliant writings of Lester Bangs--the most outrageous and popular rock critic of the 1970s--edited and with an introduction by the reigning dean of rack critics, Greil Marcus.

Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung

Vintage presents the paperback edition of the wild and brilliant writings of Lester Bangs--the most outrageous and popular rock critic of the 1970s--edited and with an introduction by the reigning dean of rack critics, Greil Marcus.

Main Lines Blood Feasts and Bad Taste

Singularly entertaining, this book is an absolute must for anyone interested in the history of rock.

Main Lines  Blood Feasts  and Bad Taste

Before his untimely death in 1982, Lester Bangs was inarguably the most influential critic of rock and roll. Writing in hyper-intelligent Benzedrine prose that calls to mind Jack Kerouac and Hunter S. Thompson, he eschewed all conventional thinking as he discussed everything from Black Sabbath being the first truly Catholic band to Anne Murray’s smoldering sexuality. In Mainlines, Blood Feasts, Bad Taste fellow rock critic John Morthland has compiled a companion volume to Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung, the first, now classic collection of Bangs’s work. Here are excerpts from an autobiographical piece Bangs wrote as a teenager, travel essays, and, of course, the music pieces, essays, and criticism covering everything from titans like Miles Davis, Lou Reed, and the Rolling Stones to esoteric musicians like Brian Eno and Captain Beefheart. Singularly entertaining, this book is an absolute must for anyone interested in the history of rock.

The Clash Takes on the World

Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung, 31–52, New York: Vintage, 1988. Bangs, Lester (1971), 'James Taylor Marked For Death', in G. Marcus (ed.), Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung, 53–81, New York: Vintage, 1988.

The Clash Takes on the World

On their debut, The Clash famously claimed to be “bored with the USA,” but The Clash wasn't a parochial record. Mick Jones' licks on songs such as “Hate and War” were heavily influenced by classic American rock and roll, and the cover of Junior Murvin's reggae hit “Police and Thieves” showed that the band's musical influences were already wide-ranging. Later albums such as Sandinista! and Combat Rock saw them experimenting with a huge range of musical genres, lyrical themes and visual aesthetics. The Clash Takes on the World explores the transnational aspects of The Clash's music, lyrics and politics, and it does so from a truly transnational perspective. It brings together literary scholars, historians, media theorists, musicologists, social activists and geographers from Europe and the US, and applies a range of critical approaches to The Clash's work in order to tackle a number of key questions: How should we interpret their negotiations with reggae music and culture? How did The Clash respond to the specific socio-political issues of their time, such as the economic recession, the Reagan-Thatcher era and burgeoning neoliberalism, and international conflicts in Nicaragua and the Falkland Islands? How did they reconcile their anti-capitalist stance with their own success and status as a global commodity? And how did their avowedly inclusive, multicultural stance, reflected in their musical diversity, square with the experience of watching the band in performance? The Clash Takes on the World is essential reading for scholars, students and general readers interested in a band whose popularity endures.

Lipstick Traces

A cult classic in a new edition. This book is about a single, serpentine fact: late in 1976 a record called 'Anarchy in the UK' was issued in London, and this event launched a transformation of pop music all over the world.

Lipstick Traces

A cult classic in a new edition. This book is about a single, serpentine fact: late in 1976 a record called 'Anarchy in the UK' was issued in London, and this event launched a transformation of pop music all over the world. The song distilled, in crudely poetic form, a critique of modern society once set out by a small group of Paris intellectuals. In Lipstick Traces, Greil Marcus's classic book on punk, Dadaism, the situationists, medieval heretics and the Knights of the Round Table (amongst others), the greatest cultural critic of our times unravels the secret history of the twentieth century.

Kathy Acker

Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung, edited by Greil Marcus, London, William Heinemann, 1988. pp. 224–259. ———. “James Taylor Marked for Death”. Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung, edited by Greil Marcus, London, ...

Kathy Acker

This project is a feminist study of the idiosyncratic oeuvre of Kathy Acker and how her unique art and politics, located at the explosive intersection of punk, postmodernism, and feminism, critiques and exemplifies late twentieth-century capitalism. There is no female or feminist writer like Kathy Acker (and probably no male either). Her body of work—nine novels, novellas, essays, reviews, poetry, and film scripts, published in a period spanning the 1970s to the mid 1990s—is the most developed body of contemporary feminist postmodernist work and of the punk aesthetic in a literary form. Some 20 years after her death, Kathy Acker: Punk Writer gives a detailed and comprehensive analysis of how Acker melds the philosophy and poetics of the European avant-garde with the vernacular and ethos of her punk subculture to voice an idiosyncratic feminist radical politics in literary form: a punk feminism. With its aesthetics of shock, transgression, parody, Debordian détournement, caricature, and montage, her oeuvre reimagines the fin-de-siècle United States as a schlock horror film for her punk girl protagonist: Acker’s cipher for herself and other rebellious and nonconformist women. This approach will allow the reader to more fully understand Acker as a writer who inhabits an explosive and creative nexus of contemporary women’s writing, punk culture, and punk feminism’s reimagining of late capitalism. This vital work will be an important text at both undergraduate and graduate levels in gender and women’s studies, postmodern studies, and twentieth-century American literature.

Let it Blurt

20-2]: “Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung"; Bangs on Davis, p. 21: letter to ]ohn Sinclair; Bangs on Mingus, p. 22: “Notes on Mingus"; Bangs on Kerouac. p. 22: book review, Doctor Sax / Mexico City Blues] Lonesome Tnn'ele1'; ...

Let it Blurt

Let It Blurt is the raucous and righteous biography of Lester Bangs (1949-82)--the gonzo journalist, gutter poet, and romantic visionary of rock criticism. No writer on rock 'n' roll ever lived harder or wrote better--more passionately, more compellingly, more penetratingly. He lived the rock 'n' roll lifestyle, guzzling booze and Romilar like water, matching its energy in prose that erupted from the pages of Rolling Stone, Creem, and The Village Voice. Bangs agitated in the seventies for sounds that were harsher, louder, more electric, and more alive, in the course of which he charted and defined the aesthetics of heavy metal and punk. He was treated as a peer by such brash visionaries as Lou Reed, Patti Smith, Richard Hell, Captain Beefheart, The Clash, Debbie Harry, and other luminaries. Let It Blurt is a scrupulously researched account of Lester Bangs's fascinating (if often tawdry and unappetizing) life story, as well as a window on rock criticism and rock culture in their most turbulent and creative years. It includes a never-before-published piece by Bangs, the hilarious "How to Be a Rock Critic," in which he reveals the secrets of his dubious, freeloading trade.

Punk Rock Warlord the Life and Work of Joe Strummer

Psychotic Reactions and Carburator dung. new york: alfred a. knopf, 1987. —. Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor dung. new york: anchor Books, 2003. Banner, Simon. “hell on Reels.” Spin 3.5 (1987): 71–3. Battaglia, andy and Scott ...

Punk Rock Warlord  the Life and Work of Joe Strummer

This collection explores the relevance of Joe Strummer within the continuing legacies of both punk rock and progressive politics. It is aimed at those interested in the Clash, punk culture, and the intersections between pop music and politics, on both sides of the Atlantic. Contributors represent a wide range of disciplines and their work examines all phases of Strummer’s career, from his early days as “Woody” the busker to the whirlwind years as front man for the Clash, to the “wilderness years” and final days with the Mescaleros. Punk Rock Warlord offers an engaging survey of its subject, while at the same time challenging some of the historical narratives that have been constructed around Strummer the Punk Icon.

From the Arthouse to the Grindhouse

Greil Marcus, “Introduction and Acknowledgements,” in Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung: The Work of a Legendary Critic: Rock 'n' Roll as Literature and Literature as Rock 'n' Roll, ed. Greil Marcus (New York: Anchor Books, 1988), ...

From the Arthouse to the Grindhouse

This collection of essays represents key contributions to 'transgression cinema:' overlooked, forgotten, or under-analyzed movies that walk the fine line between 'arthouse' and 'grindhouse' film.

A Change Is Gonna Come

... 1997 ) ; Lester Bangs's chapter on the Clash in Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung , pp . 224–59 ; and Dave Marsh's Born to Run : The Bruce Springsteen Story , volume 1 ( New York : Thunder's Mouth , 1996 ) .

A Change Is Gonna Come

The new edition of the groundbreaking chronicle of forty years of black music in America

Dirty Blvd

“Lounee Tunes”: Lester Bangs, Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung: The Work of a Legendary Critic; Rock 'n' Roll as Literature and Literature as Rock 'n' Roll, ed. Greil Marcus (New York: Anchor, 1988), 199.

Dirty Blvd


The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English

281, May 1976 the zit-pocked lumpen of Madison Square Garden — Lester Bangs, Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung, p. 209, 1977 The policeman who dropped her off at Barbary Lane was so young that he had zits — Armistead Maupin, ...

The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English

Booklist Top of the List Reference Source The heir and successor to Eric Partridge's brilliant magnum opus, The Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, this two-volume New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English is the definitive record of post WWII slang. Containing over 60,000 entries, this new edition of the authoritative work on slang details the slang and unconventional English of the English-speaking world since 1945, and through the first decade of the new millennium, with the same thorough, intense, and lively scholarship that characterized Partridge's own work. Unique, exciting and, at times, hilariously shocking, key features include: unprecedented coverage of World English, with equal prominence given to American and British English slang, and entries included from Australia, New Zealand, Canada, India, South Africa, Ireland, and the Caribbean emphasis on post-World War II slang and unconventional English published sources given for each entry, often including an early or significant example of the term’s use in print. hundreds of thousands of citations from popular literature, newspapers, magazines, movies, and songs illustrating usage of the headwords dating information for each headword in the tradition of Partridge, commentary on the term’s origins and meaning New to this edition: A new preface noting slang trends of the last five years Over 1,000 new entries from the US, UK and Australia New terms from the language of social networking Many entries now revised to include new dating, new citations from written sources and new glosses The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English is a spectacular resource infused with humour and learning – it’s rude, it’s delightful, and it’s a prize for anyone with a love of language. In addition to this hard back two volume set, The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English will also be the first slang dictionary available on-line, giving readers unprecedented access to the rich world of slang. For details, including hardback plus on-line bundle offers, please visit www.partridgeslangonline.com

American Music

[18] As early has his 1971 essay "Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung", rock critic Lester Bangs, used the term "grungy" in passing, although not to characterize a genre: "...The Count Five, who weren't so hot at it actually but ...

American Music

The music of the United States is so cool! It reflects the country’s multicultural population through a diverse array of styles. Rock and roll, hip hop, country, rhythm and blues, and jazz are among the country’s most internationally renowned genres. Since the beginning of the 20th century, popular recorded music from the United States has become increasingly known across the world, to the point where some forms of American popular music is listened to almost everywhere. A history and an introduction in the ethnic music in the United States, American Indian music, classical music, folk music, hip hop, march music, popular music, patriotic music, as well as the American pop, rock, barbershop music, bluegrass music, blues, bounce music, Doo-wop, gospel, heavy metal, jazz, R&B, and the North American Western music.

Elvis After Elvis

Reprinted (1987) in Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung (pp. 212'16). New York: Alfred A. Knopf. Bangs, L. (1980). “From Notes for Review of Peter Guralnick's Lost Highway.” Reprinted (1987) in Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor ...

Elvis After Elvis

'For a dead man, Elvis Presley is awfully noisy. His body may have failed him in 1977, but today his spirit, his image, and his myths do more than live on: they flourish, they thrive, they multiply.' Why is Elvis Presley so ubiquitous a presence in US culture? Why does he continue to enjoy a cultural prominence that would be the envy of the most heavily publicized living celebrities? In Elvis after Elvis Gil Rodman traces the myriad manifestations of The King in popular and not-so-popular culture. He asks why Elvis continues to defy our expectations of how dead stars are supposed to behave: Elvis not only refuses to go away, he keeps showing up in places where he seemingly doesn't belong. Rodman draws upon an extensive and eclectic body of Elvis 'sightings', from Elvis's appearances at the heart of the 1992 Presidential campaign to the debate over his worthiness as a subject for a postage stamp, and from Elvis's central role in furious debates about racism and the appropriation of African-American music to the world of Elvis impersonators and the importance of Graceland as a place of pilgrimage for Elvis fans and followers. Rodman shows how Elvis has become inseparable from many of the defining myths of US culture, enmeshed with the American dream and the very idea of the 'United States', caught up in debates about race, gender and sexuality and in the wars over what constitutes a national culture.

Against Ambience and Other Essays

Bangs, Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung, 75. Ibid. Migone, Christof, “Ricochets,” 2000 http://www.christofmigone.com/html/projects_gallery/ricochets.html (accessed January 1, 2013). Taussig, Michael, Mimesis and Alterity, 1993, ...

Against Ambience and Other Essays

Against Ambience diagnoses - in order to cure - the art world's recent turn toward ambience. Over the course of three short months - June to September, 2013 - the four most prestigious museums in New York indulged the ambience of sound and light: James Turrell at the Guggenheim, Soundings at MoMA, Robert Irwin at the Whitney, and Janet Cardiff at the Met. In addition, two notable shows at smaller galleries indicate that this is not simply a major-donor movement. Collectively, these shows constitute a proposal about what we wanted from art in 2013. While we're in the soft embrace of light, the NSA and Facebook are still collecting our data, the money in our bank accounts is still being used to fund who-knows-what without our knowledge or consent, the government we elected is still imprisoning and targeting people with whom we have no beef. We deserve an art that is the equal of our information age. Not one that parrots the age's self-assertions or modes of dissemination, but an art that is hyper-aware, vigilant, active, engaged, and informed. We are now one hundred years clear of Duchamp's first readymades. So why should we find ourselves so thoroughly in thrall to ambience? Against Ambience argues for an art that acknowledges its own methods and intentions; its own position in the structures of cultural power and persuasion. Rather than the warm glow of light or the soothing wash of sound, Against Ambience proposes an art that cracks the surface of our prevailing patterns of encounter, initiating productive disruptions and deconstructions.

Culturcide and Non Identity across American Culture

In Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung, edited by Greil Marcus, 301–4. New York: Vintage, 1988. ———. “The White Noise Supremacists.” In Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung, edited by Greil Marcus, 272–82.

Culturcide and Non Identity across American Culture

This book is an examination of theories and practices of non-identity in American culture, one interested in seeing identity as varied, diffuse and distorted through subjects ranging from hip hop parodies to punk preppies to pachuco-ska; thus, the work itself crosses the lines of genre, medium and discipline.

Sells Like Teen Spirit

Bangs, Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung, p. 36. 22. Ibid, p. 34. 23. Ibid, p. 32. 24. Gendron, Between Montmartre and the Mudd Club. 25. Quoted in ibid., p. 232. 26. Gendron, Between Monmartre and the Mudd Club, pp.

Sells Like Teen Spirit

Music has always been central to the cultures that young people create, follow, and embrace. In the 1960s, young hippie kids sang along about peace with the likes of Bob Dylan and Joan Baez and tried to change the world. In the 1970s, many young people ended up coming home in body bags from Vietnam, and the music scene changed, embracing punk and bands like The Sex Pistols. In Sells Like Teen Spirit, Ryan Moore tells the story of how music and youth culture have changed along with the economic, political, and cultural transformations of American society in the last four decades. By attending concerts, hanging out in dance clubs and after-hour bars, and examining the do-it-yourself music scene, Moore gives a riveting, first-hand account of the sights, sounds, and smells of “teen spirit.” Moore traces the histories of punk, hardcore, heavy metal, glam, thrash, alternative rock, grunge, and riot grrrl music, and relates them to wider social changes that have taken place. Alongside the thirty images of concert photos, zines, flyers, and album covers in the book, Moore offers original interpretations of the music of a wide range of bands including Black Sabbath, Black Flag, Metallica, Nirvana, and Sleater-Kinney. Written in a lively, engaging, and witty style, Sells Like Teen Spirit suggests a more hopeful attitude about the ways that music can be used as a counter to an overly commercialized culture, showcasing recent musical innovations by youth that emphasize democratic participation and creative self-expression—even at the cost of potential copyright infringement.

Out of Time

See Lester Bangs, “Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung,” Creem (1971), repr. in Psychotic Reactions and Carburetor Dung, (New York: Knopf, 1985), 10. Clement Greenberg, “Post Painterly Abstraction,” in CEC, 4:194.

Out of Time

Focusing on the thirty-three paintings that Philip Guston exhibited at the Marlborough Gallery in 1970, this in-depth account reconsiders the history of postwar American art and the conception of figuration in modern art history. Through a myriad of cultural touchstones, including evidence from literary and musical vogues of the period, Robert Slifkin examines the role of history as both artistic medium and creative catalyst to Guston’s practice as a painter. Slifkin employs a wealth of visual examples, archival materials, and original scholarship to situate Guston’s paintings within broader artistic debates of the time, using the cultural movement of “the sixties” as its orienting foreground. This historical framework provides an interface between the notions of time in art and time in the material world. Lively and edifying, Slifkin’s comprehensive text productively complicates the prescribed traditions of postwar art history and, in turn, shifts our perception of Guston and his place in the domain of modern art.

Listening to Van Morrison

This book is Marcus's quest to understand Van Morrison's particular genius through the extraordinary and unclassifiable moments in his long career, beginning in 1965 and continuing in full force to this day.

Listening to Van Morrison

'Van Morrison,' says Greil Marcus, 'remains a singer who can be compared to no other in the history of modern popular music.' When Astral Weeks was released in 1968, it was largely ignored. When it was re-released as a live album in 2009 it reached the top of the Billboard charts, a first for any Van Morrison recording. The wild swings in the music, mirroring the swings in Morrison's success and in people's appreciation (or lack of it) of his music, make Van Morrison one of the most perplexing and mysterious figures in popular modern music, and a perfect subject for the wise and insightful scrutiny of Greil Marcus, one of America's most dedicated cultural critics. This book is Marcus's quest to understand Van Morrison's particular genius through the extraordinary and unclassifiable moments in his long career, beginning in 1965 and continuing in full force to this day. In these dislocations Marcus finds the singer on his own artistic quest precisely to reach some extreme musical threshold, the moments that are not enclosed by the will or the intention of the performer but which somehow emerge at the limits of the musician and his song.