Publishers Weekly

... by William M. Tay- publisher.- Vational Baptist . lor . . ( Randolph ) . The design of this volume is to give a consecutive view of our Saviour's York Publishers ' Weekly , issues this year an That always valuable publication ...

Publishers  Weekly


The Publishers Weekly

RESOLVED , That this Convention recognize the PublisHERS ' WEEKLY as the established organ of the entire trade , and recommend it to publishers as the medium through which they should make their " first announcement " of books they ...

The Publishers Weekly


Publishers Weekly

Herr Lundberg urges French and Englisb publishers to enter the Scandinavian market but considering the general " on sale " custom and the consequent credit difficulties it hardly seems likely that English publishers will soon attempt to ...

Publishers Weekly


The publishers weekly

From the four corners of the book world — the publisher, book £o | store, library and school — here's vital information every month to supplement your Publishers' Weekly subscription... Join the thousands of PW subscribers who rely on ...

The publishers weekly


Publishers Weekly

THE WEEK Editor : Madalynne Reuter Authors Ask Publishers to Scrap Indemnity Clause • " to accept financial responsibility for the defense of libel suits ; " to establish a comprehensive system of libel and privacy insurance that ...

Publishers Weekly


Minders of Make believe

Selma Lanes, "Fifty Years of Viking Junior Books," Publishers Weekly (February 18, 1983) : 68-72. 12. Leonard S. Marcus, "An Interview with Walter Lorraine," The Horn Book (March-April 1998): 176-77. 13. Selma G. Lanes, The Art of ...

Minders of Make believe

Examines the dramatic changes that occurred in children's literature during the twentieth century, the growth and impact of major publishing houses, the influence of key publishing figures, and the contributions of pioneering editors, educators, and librarians.

Cather Studies Volume 12

Publishers' Weekly, 15 January 1927, 182. —. Advertisement for Sinclair Lewis's Elmer Gantry. Publishers' Weekly, 22 January 1927, 260. —. Advertisement for Sinclair Lewis's Elmer Gantry. Publishers' Weekly, 26 March 1927, 1320. —.

Cather Studies  Volume 12

Over the five decades of her writing career Willa Cather responded to, and entered into dialogue with, shifts in the terrain of American life. These cultural encounters informed her work as much as the historical past in which much of her writing is based. Cather was a multifaceted cultural critic, immersing herself in the arts, broadly defined: theater and opera, art, narrative, craft production. Willa Cather and the Arts shows that Cather repeatedly engaged with multiple forms of art, and that even when writing about the past she was often addressing contemporary questions. The essays in this volume are informed by new modes of contextualization, including the increasingly popular view of Cather as a pivotal or transitional figure working between and across very different cultural periods and by the recent publication of Cather's correspondence. The collection begins by exploring the ways Cather encountered and represented high and low cultures, including Cather's use of "racialized vernacular" in Sapphira and the Slave Girl. The next set of essays demonstrates how historical research, often focusing on local features in Cather's fiction, contributes to our understanding of American culture, from musicological sources to the cultural development of Pittsburgh. The final trio of essays highlights current Cather scholarship, including a food studies approach to O Pioneers! and an examination of Cather's use of ancient philosophy in The Professor's House. Together the essays reassess Cather's lifelong encounter with, and interpretation and reimagining of, the arts.

Who Owns the Media

Purchase ofRandom House Completed, ̄ Publisher's Weekly,July 1, 1998, both from the Web site at www.bookwire.com. ... RestructuresSales Force intoThree Groups, ̄ Publishers Weekly, March 29, 1999, found at Websiteatwww.bookwire.com. 55.

Who Owns the Media

This thorough update to Benjamin Compaine's original 1979 benchmark and 1982 revisit of media ownership tackles the question of media ownership, providing a detailed examination of the current state of the media industry. Retaining the wealth of data of the earlier volumes, Compaine and his co-author Douglas Gomery chronicle the myriad changes in the media industry and the factors contributing to these changes. They also examine how the media industry is being reshaped by technological forces in all segments, as well as by social and cultural reactions to these forces. This third edition of Who Owns the Media? has been reorganized and expanded, reflecting the evolution of the media industry structure. Looking beyond conventional wisdom and expectations, Compaine and Gomery examine the characteristics of competition in the media marketplace, present alternative positions on the meanings of concentration, and ultimately urge readers to draw their own conclusions on an issue that is neither black nor white. Appropriate for media practitioners and sociologists, historians, and economists studying mass media, this volume can also be used for advanced courses in broadcasting, journalism, mass communication, telecommunications, and media education. As a new benchmark for the current state of media ownership, it is invaluable to anyone needing to understand who controls the media and thus the information and entertainment messages received by media consumers.

The Transnational in Literary Studies

Publishers Weekly, 14 September 2018. https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/publisher-news/article/ 78023-global-publishing-leaders-2018-bertelsmann.html (15 November 2018). “Global Publishing Leaders 2018: Grupo ...

The Transnational in Literary Studies

This volume clarifies the meanings and applications of the concept of the transnational and identifies areas in which the concept can be particularly useful. The division of the volume into three parts reflects areas which seem particularly amenable to analysis through a transnational lens. The chapters in Part 1 present case studies in which the concept replaces or complements traditionally dominant concepts in literary studies. These chapters demonstrate, for example, why some dramatic texts and performances can better be described as transnational than as postcolonial, and how the transnational underlies and complements concepts such as world literature. Part 2 assesses the advantages and limitations of writing literary history with a transnational focus. These chapters illustrate how such a perspective loosens the epistemic stranglehold of national historiographies, but they also argue that the transnational and national agendas of literary historiography are frequently entangled. The chapters in Part 3 identify transnational genres such as the transnational historical novel, transnational migrant fiction and translinguistic theatre, and analyse the specific poetics and politics of these genres.

A Novel Marketplace

Publishers Weekly 10January 1953:133. “Publishers' Trade Book Sales.” Publishers Weekly 3January 1953: 25. Publishers Weekly 1872–1997: Our Industry and Its Magazine Through the Years. Spec. issue of Publishers Weekly 2July 1997.

A Novel Marketplace

As television transformed American culture in the 1950s, critics feared the influence of this newly pervasive mass medium on the nation's literature. While many studies have addressed the rhetorical response of artists and intellectuals to mid-twentieth-century mass culture, the relationship between the emergence of this culture and the production of novels has gone largely unexamined. In A Novel Marketplace, Evan Brier illuminates the complex ties between postwar mass culture and the making, marketing, and reception of American fiction. Between 1948, when television began its ascendancy, and 1959, when Random House became a publicly owned corporation, the way American novels were produced and distributed changed considerably. Analyzing a range of mid-century novels—including Paul Bowles's The Sheltering Sky, Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, Sloan Wilson's The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, and Grace Metalious's Peyton Place—Brier reveals the specific strategies used to carve out cultural and economic space for the American novel just as it seemed most under threat. During this anxious historical moment, the book business underwent an improbable expansion, by capitalizing on an economic boom and a rising population of educated consumers and by forming institutional alliances with educators and cold warriors to promote reading as both a cultural and political good. A Novel Marketplace tells how the book trade and the novelists themselves successfully positioned their works as embattled holdouts against an oppressive mass culture, even as publishers formed partnerships with mass-culture institutions that foreshadowed the multimedia mergers to come in the 1960s. As a foil for and a partner to literary institutions, mass media corporations assisted in fostering the novel's development as both culture and commodity.

Concentration Processes on the U S Book Market

Apparently, according to the Publishers Weekly, the sales of bestsellers increased much more than the total sales, indicating a growing importance of bestsellers.14 1.2 Publishing According to an estimate by The Association of American ...

Concentration Processes on the U S  Book Market

Seminar paper from the year 2008 in the subject Book Science, grade: 1,7, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, course: Bookmarkets in Germany and in English-speaking countries, 30 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: This paper will treat the theme of consolidation processes on the U.S. book mar-ket. Concentration within the book industry of course is an international phenomenon but the U.S. are of certain interest as they boast the by far largest book market in the world . Moreover, the concentration on this book market has reached a very high level and is certainly one of the highest in comparison with international book markets. And developments on U.S. markets in general often tend to influence or to anticipate those of other countries.

The Publishers Trade List Annual

This first and THE PUBLISHERS ' WEEKLY . cities ; editorial discussions on book and trade THE PUBLISHERS ' WEEKLY ... publisher's name , size , number of pages , and price : an't also descriptive notes of books receiveri . der the name ...

The Publishers  Trade List Annual


Demanding Respect

“Manga Releases Up 16% in 2007,” ICv2, http:/www.icv2.com/articles/ news/10034.html (accessed November 29, 2007); “Graphic Novels by the Numbers,” Publishers Weekly, March 5, 2007, 9. 16. “American Association of Publishers 2006 S1 ...

Demanding Respect

From pulp comics to Maus, the story of the growth of comics in American culture.

Marion Zimmer Bradley

“Review: The Forest House,” Publishers Weekly (1 April 1994). “Review: The Heirs of Hammerfell,” Publishers Weekly (29 November 1989). “Review: In the Rift,” Kirkus (1 April 1998). “Review: Lythande,” Publishers Weekly (27 June 1986): ...

Marion Zimmer Bradley

This literary companion surveys the young adult works of American author Marion Zimmer Bradley, primarily known for her work in the fantasy genre. An A to Z arrangement includes coverage of novels (The Catch Trap, Survey Ship, The Fall of Atlantis, The Firebrand, The Forest House and The Mists of Avalon), the graphic narrative Warrior Woman, the Lythande novella The Gratitude of Kings, and, from the Darkover series, The Shattered Chain, The Sword of Aldones and Traitor's Sun. Separate entries on dominant themes--rape, divination, religion, violence, womanhood, adaptation and dreams--comb stories and longer works for the author's insights about the motivation of institutions that oppress marginalized groups, especially women.

the library journal

library , more adequate accommodation for giving PUBLISHER'S NOTICE . out books , a new and more commodious room for With this ... These plans are features merged in the PUBLISHERS ' WEEKLY , comready to be submitted for the approval of ...

 the library journal


Wisconsin Library Bulletin

Publishers ' Weekly , February 5 , 1962. pp . 90-96 . Roland Baughman . " The 1959 fifty books ; a progress ( ? ) report . " Publishers ' Weekly , April 6 , 1959. pp . 56-64 . " Book Jackets '61 : the T & R competition .

Wisconsin Library Bulletin


Assessment of Library Collections in a Consortial Environment

Publishers Weekly 253 (40): 4, 6. Nelson, Sara. 2005. For love or numbers: BookScan's fickle figures of fate. Publishers Weekly 252 (10): 10. Nelson, Sara. 2006. Literary recount. Publishers Weekly 253 (23): 6. Nelson, Sara. 2006.

Assessment of Library Collections in a Consortial Environment

The consortial environment provides librarians with new ways to manage collections at their home institutions. Academic libraries in Ohio have been participating in OhioLINK since 1988, and the consortium has had an effect on shaping local collections for more than one decade. While each institution pursues its own collection management strategy, the shared resources and delivery system provided through OhioLINK influence local collections profoundly. What has been the effect? This work is a collection of articles assessing local collections within a consortial environment. The authors assess collections from their own vantage points, considering such diverse factors as cost, regional depositories, book reviews, and faculty input. The influence of consortial ties in shaping local collections is a common thread throughout the work. This book was published as a special issue of Collection Management.

The American Writer

Lisa See Kendall, “Works by Native American Writers Find Wider Audience,” Publishers Weekly, September , , . 28. Joseph Barbato, “Latino Writers in the American Market,” Publishers Weekly, February , , . 29. “The Big Aiiieeeee!:

The American Writer

"A fascinating read and impressive analysis of American literature. Beautifully written and relentlessly researched."--Bob Eckstein, New York Times bestselling author of Footnotes from the World's Greatest Bookstores. The American writer--both real and fictitious, famous and obscure--has traditionally been situated on the margins of society, an outsider looking in. From The Great Gatsby's Nick Carraway to the millions of bloggers today, writers are generally seen as onlookers documenting the human condition. Yet their own collective story has largely gone untold. Tracing the role of the writer in the United States over the last century, this book describes how those who use language as a creative medium have held a special place in our collective imagination.