Publishing in Tsarist Russia

As this volume convincingly argues, this is because the Russian language at this time was a lingua franca; it crossed borders and boundaries, reaching speakers of varying nationalities.

Publishing in Tsarist Russia

According to Benedict Anderson, the rapid expansion of print media during the late-1700s popularised national history and standardised national languages, thus helping create nation-states and national identities at the expense of the old empires. Publishing in Tsarist Russia challenges this theory and, by examining the history of Russian publishing through a transnational lens, reveals how the popular press played an important and complex Imperial role, while providing a “soft infrastructure” which the subjects could access to change Imperial order. As this volume convincingly argues, this is because the Russian language at this time was a lingua franca; it crossed borders and boundaries, reaching speakers of varying nationalities. Russian publications, then, were able to effectively operate within the structure of Imperialism but as a public space, they went beyond the control of the Tsar and ethnic Russians. This exciting international team of scholars provide a much-needed, fresh take on the history of Russian publishing and contribute significantly to our understanding of print media, language and empire from the 18th to 20th centuries. Publishing in Tsarist Russia is therefore a vital resource for scholars of Russian history, comparative nationalism, and publishing studies.

Publishing in Tsarist Russia

ones.15 As a result, a new mediasphere appeared in society, where publishers, bookshoppers and readers from ... the Russian Empire, but examines the kind of people that were involved in the development of Russian publishing networks.

Publishing in Tsarist Russia

According to Benedict Anderson, the rapid expansion of print media during the late-1700s popularised national history and standardised national languages, thus helping create nation-states and national identities at the expense of the old empires. Publishing in Tsarist Russia challenges this theory and, by examining the history of Russian publishing through a transnational lens, reveals how the popular press played an important and complex Imperial role, while providing a “soft infrastructure” which the subjects could access to change Imperial order. As this volume convincingly argues, this is because the Russian language at this time was a lingua franca; it crossed borders and boundaries, reaching speakers of varying nationalities. Russian publications, then, were able to effectively operate within the structure of Imperialism but as a public space, they went beyond the control of the Tsar and ethnic Russians. This exciting international team of scholars provide a much-needed, fresh take on the history of Russian publishing and contribute significantly to our understanding of print media, language and empire from the 18th to 20th centuries. Publishing in Tsarist Russia is therefore a vital resource for scholars of Russian history, comparative nationalism, and publishing studies.

The End of Tsarist Russia

This is history with a heartbeat, and it could not be more engrossing."—Foreign Affairs World War I and the Russian Revolution together shaped the twentieth century in profound ways.

The End of Tsarist Russia

An Economist Best Book of the Year A Financial Times Best Book of the Year Winner of the the Pushkin House Russian Book Prize Finalist for the Lionel Gelber Prize An Amazon Best Book of the Month (History) One of the world’s leading scholars offers a fresh interpretation of the linked origins of World War I and the Russian Revolution "Lieven has a double gift: first, for harvesting details to convey the essence of an era and, second, for finding new, startling, and clarifying elements in familiar stories. This is history with a heartbeat, and it could not be more engrossing."—Foreign Affairs World War I and the Russian Revolution together shaped the twentieth century in profound ways. In The End of Tsarist Russia, acclaimed scholar Dominic Lieven connects for the first time the two events, providing both a history of the First World War’s origins from a Russian perspective and an international history of why the revolution happened. Based on exhaustive work in seven Russian archives as well as many non-Russian sources, Dominic Lieven’s work is about far more than just Russia. By placing the crisis of empire at its core, Lieven links World War I to the sweep of twentieth-century global history. He shows how contemporary hot issues such as the struggle for Ukraine were already crucial elements in the run-up to 1914. By incorporating into his book new approaches and comparisons, Lieven tells the story of war and revolution in a way that is truly original and thought-provoking.

The Tsar s Armenians

Onol places the evolution within a context of wider political questions, such as the Russian revolutionary movement, Russia's nationalities question, Tsarist fears of pan-Islamism, the path to World War I and the influence of key characters ...

The Tsar s Armenians

In 1903 Tsar Nicholas II issued a decree allowing the confiscation of Armenian Church property, marking the low point in relations between imperial Russia and its Armenian subjects. Yet just over a decade later, Russian Armenians were fully supportive of the Russian war effort. Drawing on previously untouched archival material and a range of secondary sources published in English, French, Russian and Turkish, this is the first English-language study of this drastic change in relations in the Caucasus. Onur Onol explains how and why the shift took place by looking in detail at the imperial Russian authorities and their relationship with the three pillars of the Russian Armenian community: the Armenian Church, the Armenian bourgeoisie and the Armenian Revolutionary Federation (Dashnaktsutiun). Onol places the evolution within a context of wider political questions, such as the Russian revolutionary movement, Russia's nationalities question, Tsarist fears of pan-Islamism, the path to World War I and the influence of key characters in Russian policy making, from Pyotr Stolypin to Illarion Vorontsov-Dashkov.This book fills a conspicuous void in the extant historiography, and will be of interest to scholars working on Russian, Armenian and Ottoman history.

A Mennonite Family in Tsarist Russia and the Soviet Union 1789 1923

General Editor, Harvey L. Dyck; Associate Editor,_]ohn R. Staples National Library of Canada Cataloguing in Publication Rempel, David G A Mennonite family in Tsarist Russia and the Soviet Union. 1789-1923 / Daw'd G. Rempel with Cornelia ...

A Mennonite Family in Tsarist Russia and the Soviet Union  1789 1923

Rempel combines his first-hand account of life in Russian Mennonite settlements during the landmark period of 1900-1920, with a rich portrait of six generations of his ancestral family from the foundation of the first colony in 1789.

Joseph Stalin

Who was Stalin? What did he really want? In this book we explore the complexities and nuances of the living, breathing conundrum who called himself Joseph Stalin.

Joseph Stalin

There can be no doubt that Stalin is one of the most notorious and controversial figures in history. He presents a puzzling paradox for both psychologists and sociologists; he was simultaneously revered, feared, loved, and hated during his lifetime. So much has been written about the life of Joseph Stalin and yet upon closer inspection, he still seems to present us with quite an enigma. His cruelty towards his political opponents and dissidents is well known, but so are his efforts to go out of his way in lifting up the most downtrodden and desperate members of Soviet society, giving them the chance that Tsarist Russia would not. Inside you will read about... ✓ A Change of Weather ✓ The Real Revolution Begins ✓ From Exile to Supreme Leader ✓ A Brave New Word ✓ Stalin’s Gambit ✓ Stalin Makes a Comeback ✓ Defending the Capitol ✓ Going West Stalin is known as a brutish dictator who struck a bargain with Hitler as if he was an old friend, yet it was this same Stalin who would almost singlehandedly save Europe from Nazi occupation. Who was Stalin? What did he really want? In this book we explore the complexities and nuances of the living, breathing conundrum who called himself Joseph Stalin.

The Military History of Tsarist Russia

... necessarily reflect the views of any agency or department of the United States government. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data The military history of tsarist Russia / Robin Higham and Frederick W. Kagan, editors. p.

The Military History of Tsarist Russia

The Military History of Tsarist Russia examines Russian military history from the rise of the Muscovite state to the present, even peeking briefly into the future. The volume covers Russia's land forces extensively, but also covers the development of the Russian Navy, and the creation and development of the Russian Air Force - parts of the Russian military machine that are frequently neglected in general writings. The historical analysis addresses the development and function of the Russian military whether in peace or in war, as well as the impact of war and changes in the military upon Russian society and politics. Questions of military organization, doctrine, and technique are paramount, as well as the critical question of the interface between the armed forces and society.

Voluntary Associations in Tsarist Russia

Its chief publication was the Journal of Agriculture ( Zemledel'cheskii zhurnal ) , which commenced publication in 1821 and was Russia's first journal devoted exclusively to agriculture ; Nicholas I was one of its most avid readers .

Voluntary Associations in Tsarist Russia

This text investigates the role of learned, mostly scientific societies in building civil society in imperial Russia. It challenges the idea that Russia did not have the building blocks of a democratic society.

My Life for the Book

Available at long last, this volume is the posthumous memoir of a peasant from the depths of old Russia who rose to great wealth and influence as his country's most successful publisher.

My Life for the Book

Available at long last, this volume is the posthumous memoir of a peasant from the depths of old Russia who rose to great wealth and influence as his country's most successful publisher. Though never fully literate, Ivan Dmitrievich Sytin (1851-1934) was a shrewd businessman who made millions by publishing books for all manner of readers. My Life for the Book makes available the full text of Sytin's unpublished memoir, along with various writings by those who knew him. Through sharp and unremittingly ironic observations, Sytin describes with insight and amusement or dismay Tsarist Russia's bureaucracy, the Orthodox Church, the Imperial court, and a number of the country's most renowned writers, including Anton Chekhov, Leo Tolstoy, Maxim Gorky, and journalist Vlas Doroshevich. Sytin's memoir, a tale of Great Russian society voiced by a parvenu, depicts a pre-Revolutionary Russia of small shops, churches, convents, deep religious faith, and flawed rulers. While the Revolution eventually deprived Sytin of all means to continuing publishing, his resilience and enterprise remain a lasting legacy.

La Plevitskaya

For the first time told in full, this historical novel, or work of narrative history, offers an insight into the life of a revered performer who fell from grace in exile. The book was written to entertain, astound, and enjoy.

La Plevitskaya

Extraordinary biographical novel of Gypsy singer Nadezhda Plevitskaya (1884 - 1940) who rose from the camps to become the inspiration of composers Serguey Rakhmaninoff and Yigor Stravinsky. As Plevitskomania swept over Russia she became accredited to the Tsar's Court. For the first time told in full, this historical novel, or work of narrative history, offers an insight into the life of a revered performer who fell from grace in exile. The book was written to entertain, astound, and enjoy. 'LA PLEVITSKAYA' is meant for a readership between 12 and 82 and offers an insight into the time of Tsarist Russia which saw so many leave for far away shores. It contains a glossary and a relationship diagram how Plevitskaya related to the movers and shakers in her lifetime.

Mother

A novel of Tsarist Russia in upheaval.

Mother

A novel of Tsarist Russia in upheaval.

Visions of the Revolution

VISIONS OF THE REVOLUTIONJeffrey MinucciIvan is a destitute, orphaned boy who witnessed the murder of his parents at the hands of a mysterious cult.

Visions of the Revolution

VISIONS OF THE REVOLUTION Jeffrey Minucci Ivan is a destitute, orphaned boy who witnessed the murder of his parents at the hands of a mysterious cult. Yet he is gifted with a rare genius and a keen sense of intuition. He has visions, seeing disturbing things that elude others. After a chance encounter with the Tsar's cousin, Ivan is propelled into the world of Tsarist Russia on the brink of a catastrophic event - the Russian Revolution. Soon he must deal with his sudden fame and rise in the Imperial order, as well as the suffering of his people. As revolution erupts and creates chaos everywhere, Ivan is faced with a stark, possibly irredeemable choice... "Fascinating! History as it might have been..." - Robin Moreton, author of Assignment Kilimanjaro Solstice Publishing - www.solsticepublishing.com

Diasporic Modernisms

... he was unable to find a Yiddish publishing venue.6 The scant publishing opportunities available to Yiddish writers, ... censorship of Yiddish publications in tsarist Russia, motivated them to seek Hebrew publishing opportunities, ...

Diasporic Modernisms

Pairing the two concepts of diaspora and modernism, Allison Schachter formulates a novel approach to modernist studies and diasporic cultural production. Diasporic Modernisms illuminates how the relationships between migrant writers and dispersed readers were registered in the innovative practices of modernist prose fiction. The Jewish writers discussed-including S. Y. Abramovitsh, Yosef Chaim Brenner, Dovid Bergelson, Leah Goldberg, Gabreil Preil, and Kadia Molodowsky--embraced diaspora as a formal literary strategy to reflect on the historical conditions of Jewish language culture. Spanning from 1894 to 1974, the book traces the development of this diasporic aesthetic in the shifting centers of Hebrew and Yiddish literature, including Odessa, Jerusalem, Berlin, Tel Aviv, and New York. Through an analysis of Jewish writing, Schachter theorizes how modernist literary networks operate outside national borders in minor and non-national languages. Offering the first comparative literary history of Hebrew and Yiddish modernist prose, Diasporic Modernisms argues that these two literary histories can no longer be separated by nationalist and monolingual histories. Instead, the book illuminates how these literary languages continue to animate each other, even after the creation of a Jewish state, with Hebrew as its national language.

Performing Tsarist Russia in New York

In Theorizing Diaspora: A Reader, edited by Jana Evans Braziel and Anita Mannur, 119–131. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2003. Raeff, Marc. Russia Abroad: A Cultural History of the Russian Emigration, 1919–1939.

Performing Tsarist Russia in New York

An examination of the popular music culture of the post-Bolshevik Russian emigration and the impact made by this group on American culture and politics. Performing Tsarist Russia in New York begins with a rich account of the musical evenings that took place in the Russian émigré enclave of Harlem in the 1920s and weaves through the world of Manhattan’s Russian restaurants, Tin Pan Alley industry, Broadway productions, 1939 World’s Fair, Soviet music distributors, postwar Russian parish musical life, and Cold War radio programming to close with today’s Russian ball scene, exploring how the idea of Russia Abroad has taken shape through various spheres of music production in New York over the course of a century. Engaging in an analysis of musical styles, performance practice, sheet music cover art, the discourses surrounding this music, and the sonic, somatic, and social realms of dance, author Natalie K. Zelensky demonstrates the central role played by music in shaping and maintaining the Russian émigré diaspora over multiple generations as well as the fundamental paradox underlying this process: that music’s sustaining power in this case rests on its proclivity to foster collective narratives of an idealized prerevolutionary Russia while often evolving stylistically to remain relevant to its makers, listeners, and dancers. By combining archival research with fieldwork and interviews with Russian émigrés of various generations and emigration waves, Zelensky presents a close historical and ethnographic examination of music’s potential as an aesthetic, discursive, and social space through which diasporans can engage with an idea of a mythologized homeland, and, in turn, the vital role played by music in the organization, development, and reception of Russia Abroad.

The Occult in Tsarist Russia

In The Occult in Tsarist Russia, author Thomas E. Berry offers a fascinating historical expose of this widespread and somewhat forgotten phenomenon; even providing some insight into how the occult might have ultimately influenced the ...

The Occult in Tsarist Russia

Witches had been burned at the stake in Medieval Russia, as they were throughout Europe. However by the 18th century the occult had become fashionable and spiritualist groups were common throughout Russia. Mediums and secretive societies were particularly popular during the reign of Catherine the Great. Occultists like Cagliostro ultimately ran afoul of the Empress, leading Catherine to author plays condemning the occult. But such was not the case by the end of the Romanov dynasty, when occultists such as Dr. Philippe and Rasputin wielded enormous influence. Nineteenth century literary figure such as Tolstoy, Turgenev, and Dostoevsky attended séances, while Pushkin shared his own family's belief in ghosts. There was even an occult newsletter called The Rebus that was published for over 40 years. In The Occult in Tsarist Russia, author Thomas E. Berry offers a fascinating historical expose of this widespread and somewhat forgotten phenomenon; even providing some insight into how the occult might have ultimately influenced the decline of the Tsarist era. Dr. Thomas E. Berry is a retired Professor of Russian language and literature who lectures in the Odssey Program of Johns Hopkins University, the Smithsonian Institution and the Russian Cultural Center of the Russian Embassy, Washington DC. He was granted a "Gramota," an award for service started by Catherine the Great, by the Russian Government for promoting relations between the US and Russia. He has lectured on many cruise lines and his books are available on Amazon.com. Publisher's website: http: //sbpra.com/ThomasEBerry

Contemporary Studies on Modern Chinese History II

The most influential works include Liu Danian's History of America's Invasion of China (People's Publishing House, ... In the middle and late 1960s, studies on Tsarist Russia's invasion of China began to heat up because of the sharp ...

Contemporary Studies on Modern Chinese History II

The study of modern Chinese history has developed rapidly in recent decades and has seen increased exploration of new topics and innovative approaches. Resulting from a special issue of Modern Chinese History Studies, this volume is devoted to showcasing the healthy development of Chinese modern history studies, and has already been revised twice in the original language. This volume exhibits major achievements on the study of modern Chinese history and shows how the role of history was in debate, transformation and re-evaluation throughout this tortuous yet prosperous period. Articles on seven different topics are collected from over ten prominent historians in order to represent their insights on the developmental paths of Chinese historical studies. Drawing on a large number of case studies of critical historical events, such as imperial China and the Chinese Workers’ Movement, this volume sets out to explore topics such as the history of Sino-foreign relations as well as the history of workers’ movements and youth movements. This book will be a valuable reference for scholars and students of Chinese history.

Popular Theater and Society in Tsarist Russia

Educated Russians, who often felt a strong sense of obligation to help the narod, dreamed of ending the perceived ... and in the 1880s it began publishing inexpensive editions of the Russian classics in a not terribly successful bid to ...

Popular Theater and Society in Tsarist Russia

This is the most comprehensive study available of the popular theater that developed during the last decades of tsarist Russia. Swift examines the origins and significance of the new "people's theaters" that were created for the lower classes in St. Petersburg and Moscow between 1861 and 1917. His extensively researched study, full of anecdotes from the theater world of the day, shows how these people's theaters became a major arena in which the cultural contests of late imperial Russia were played out and how they contributed to the emergence of an urban consumer culture during this period of rapid social and political change. Swift illuminates many aspects of the story of these popular theaters—the cultural politics and aesthetic ambitions of theater directors and actors, state censorship politics and their role in shaping the theatrical repertoire, and the theater as a vehicle for social and political reform. He looks at roots of the theaters, discusses specific theaters and performances, and explores in particular how popular audiences responded to the plays.

Rewriting Capitalism

In this ground-breaking book, Beth Holmgren examines how—in turn-of-the-century Russia and its subject, the Kingdom of Poland—capitalism affected the elitist culture of literature, publishing, book markets, and readership.

Rewriting Capitalism

In this ground-breaking book, Beth Holmgren examines how—in turn-of-the-century Russia and its subject, the Kingdom of Poland—capitalism affected the elitist culture of literature, publishing, book markets, and readership. Rewriting Capitalism considers how both “serious” writers and producers of consumer culture coped with the drastic power shift from “serious” literature to market-driven literature.