Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination

"Kenyon Gradert investigates how the nineteenth-century abolitionist movement-whether iconic figures of it like Ralph Waldo Emerson and William Lloyd Garrison or lesser-known writers and orators-drew on aspects of American Puritanism in ...

Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination

"Kenyon Gradert investigates how the nineteenth-century abolitionist movement-whether iconic figures of it like Ralph Waldo Emerson and William Lloyd Garrison or lesser-known writers and orators-drew on aspects of American Puritanism in shaping its political persona. From this angle, we can see a movement usually identified with liberal Protestantism in a radically new light; it also recasts our understanding of puritanism, often seen as a conservative force, little interested in worldly rebellion of the sort the abolitionists championed. As Gradert writes, 'By reimagining a pervasive narrative of Puritan origins, abolitionists urged the nation to war with its original sin.'"--

Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination

39 This is thus not a study of “the Puritan origins of abolition” but of the resonance of the Puritan past within the abolitionist imagination.40 To clarify this distinction, I shift terminology away from “origins” to what I call ...

Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination

The Puritans of popular memory are dour figures, characterized by humorless toil at best and witch trials at worst. “Puritan” is an insult reserved for prudes, prigs, or oppressors. Antebellum American abolitionists, however, would be shocked to hear this. They fervently embraced the idea that Puritans were in fact pioneers of revolutionary dissent and invoked their name and ideas as part of their antislavery crusade. Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination reveals how the leaders of the nineteenth-century abolitionist movement—from landmark figures like Ralph Waldo Emerson to scores of lesser-known writers and orators—drew upon the Puritan tradition to shape their politics and personae. In a striking instance of selective memory, reimagined aspects of Puritan history proved to be potent catalysts for abolitionist minds. Black writers lauded slave rebels as new Puritan soldiers, female antislavery militias in Kansas were cast as modern Pilgrims, and a direct lineage of radical democracy was traced from these early New Englanders through the American and French Revolutions to the abolitionist movement, deemed a “Second Reformation” by some. Kenyon Gradert recovers a striking influence on abolitionism and recasts our understanding of puritanism, often seen as a strictly conservative ideology, averse to the worldly rebellion demanded by abolitionists.

City on a Hill

For the positive use of an imagined Puritan heritage by abolitionists of all different sorts—white and black, male and female—see the excellent new book by Kenyon Gradert, Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination (Chicago: ...

City on a Hill

A fresh, original history of America's national narratives, told through the loss, recovery, and rise of one influential Puritan sermon from 1630 to the present day In this illuminating book, Abram C. Van Engen shows how the phrase "city on a hill," from a 1630 sermon by Massachusetts Bay governor John Winthrop, shaped the story of American exceptionalism in the twentieth century. By tracing the history of Winthrop's speech, its changing status through time, and its use in modern politics, Van Engen asks us to reevaluate our national narratives. He tells the story of curators, librarians, collectors, archivists, antiquarians, and other often anonymous figures who emphasized the role of the Pilgrims and Puritans in American history, paving the way for the saving and sanctifying of a single sermon and its eventual transformation into an American tale. This sermon's rags-to-riches rise reveals the way national stories take shape and shows us how they continue to influence competing visions of the country--the many different meanings of America that emerge from its literary past.

Faith in Exposure

Kenyon Gradert, Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2020), 4, 7. 53. Henry David Thoreau, “A Plea for Captain John Brown,” in Walden and Other Writings, ed. Brooks Atkinson (New York: ...

Faith in Exposure


Neue Aspekte der Zinzendorf Forschung

International contributions to this work focus on current research on Zinzendorf's classifications of church, theology, and literature, as well as on important developments of his life and work.

Neue Aspekte der Zinzendorf Forschung

As founder of the Moravian Church, Nicolas Ludwig von Zinzendorf and Pottendorf (1700-1760) is considered one of the central figures of European pietism. International contributions to this work focus on current research on Zinzendorf's classifications of church, theology, and literature, as well as on important developments of his life and work. External relationship to the Bohemians and Schwenckfelders, to the Lutheran critics and the English, as well as to Goethe and Karl Barth are addressed. The central commonality of all contributions is Zinzendorf's effect on historical development and his relevance in today's times. German text.

Wives Not Slaves

... 1497–1662 by Evan Haefeli The Province of Affliction: Illness and the Making of Early New England by Ben Mutschler Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination by Kenyon Gradert Trading Spaces: The Colonial Marketplace and the ...

Wives Not Slaves

Wives not Slaves begins with the story of John and Eunice Davis, a colonial American couple who, in 1762, advertised their marital difficulties in the New Hampshire Gazette—a more common practice for the time and place than contemporary readers might think. John Davis began the exchange after Eunice left him, with a notice resembling the ads about runaway slaves and servants that were a common feature of eighteenth-century newspapers. John warned neighbors against “entertaining her or harbouring her. . . or giving her credit.” Eunice defiantly replied, “If I am your wife, I am not your slave.” With this pointed but problematic analogy, Eunice connected her individual challenge to her husband’s authority with the broader critiques of patriarchal power found in the politics, religion, and literature of the British Atlantic world. Kirsten Sword’s richly researched history reconstructs the stories of wives who fled their husbands between the mid-seventeenth and early nineteenth centuries, comparing their plight with that of other runaway dependents. Wives not Slaves explores the links between local justice, the emerging press, and transatlantic political debates about marriage, slavery and imperial power. Sword traces the relationship between the distress of ordinary households, domestic unrest, and political unrest, shedding new light on the social changes imagined by eighteenth-century revolutionaries, and on the politics that determined which patriarchal forms and customs the new American nation would—and would not—abolish.

Trading Freedom

... 1497–1662 by Evan Haefeli The Province of Affliction: Illness and the Making of Early New England by Ben Mutschler Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination by Kenyon Gradert Trading Spaces: The Colonial Marketplace and the ...

Trading Freedom

Trading Freedom explores the surprisingly rich early history of US-China trade and its unexpected impact on the developing republic. The economic and geographic development of the early United States is usually thought of in trans-Atlantic terms, defined by entanglements with Europe and Africa. In Trading Freedom, Dael A. Norwood recasts these common conceptions by looking to Asia, making clear that from its earliest days, the United States has been closely intertwined with China—monetarily, politically, and psychologically. Norwood details US trade with China from the late eighteenth through the late nineteenth centuries—a critical period in America’s self-definition as a capitalist nation—and shows how global commerce was central to the articulation of that national identity. Trading Freedom illuminates how debates over political economy and trade policy, the building of the transcontinental railroad, and the looming sectional struggle over slavery were all influenced by Sino-American relations. Deftly weaving together interdisciplinary threads from the worlds of commerce, foreign policy, and immigration, Trading Freedom thoroughly dismantles the idea that American engagement with China is anything new.

A Great and Rising Nation

... and the Making of Early New England by Ben Mutschler Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination by Kenyon Gradert Trading Spaces: The Colonial Marketplace and the Foundations of American Capitalism by Emma Hart Urban Dreams, ...

A Great and Rising Nation

A Great and Rising Nation illuminates the unexplored early decades of the United States’ imperialist naval aspirations. Conventional wisdom holds that, until the Spanish-American War of 1898, the United States was a feeble player on the world stage, with an international presence rooted in commerce rather than military might. Michael A. Verney’s A Great and Rising Nation flips this notion on its head, arguing that early US naval expeditions, often characterized as merely scientific, were in fact deeply imperialist. Circling the globe from the Mediterranean to South America and the Arctic, these voyages reflected the diverse imperial aspirations of the new republic, including commercial dominance in the Pacific World, religious empire in the Holy Land, proslavery expansion in South America, and diplomatic prestige in Europe. As Verney makes clear, the United States had global imperial aspirations far earlier than is commonly thought.

Accidental Pluralism

A Series Edited by Edward Gray, Emma Hart, Stephen Mihm, and Mark Peterson ALSO IN THE SERIES: The Province of Affliction: Illness and the Making of Early New England by ben mutschler Puritan Spirits in the Abolitionist Imagination by ...

Accidental Pluralism

The United States has long been defined by its religious diversity and recurrent public debates over the religious and political values that define it. In Accidental Pluralism, Evan Haefeli argues that America did not begin as a religiously diverse and tolerant society. It became so only because England’s religious unity collapsed just as America was being colonized. By tying the emergence of American religious toleration to global events, Haefeli creates a true transnationalist history that links developing American realities to political and social conflicts and resolutions in Europe, showing how the relationships among states, churches, and publics were contested from the beginning of the colonial era and produced a society that no one had anticipated. Accidental Pluralism is an ambitious and comprehensive new account of the origins of American religious life that compels us to refine our narratives about what came to be seen as American values and their distinct relationship to religion and politics.

The Old Guard

It comes up out of an unnatural loveism , and every sort of diabolism combination of the worst elements of which the imagination of man can conpuritanism with the most grotesque and ceive . All these restless spirits , ani . licentious ...

The Old Guard


National Character and the Factors in Its Formation

Perhaps it is in the United States that we may trace the effects of the Puritan spirit most clearly today , alike in its ... but sometimes letting practice fall behind ideals , sometimes obscurantist in its clinging to imagined .

National Character and the Factors in Its Formation


Images of American Radicalism

Utopian Imagination The radical , utopian tradition is near the tap - root of American society . ... And they mistrusted the deepest impulses of the Puritan spirit : mortal fear of the forest and corresponding ethnocidal hatred toward ...

Images of American Radicalism


New Outlook

... and going to see “ an estate —the friendless Spanish waif thrown on that Puritan coastthat afterward figured as ... she would seemingly Mr. Whittier , who “ were condrop out of the conversation genial spirits , and their faand be ...

New Outlook


The Outlook

... and going to see “ an estate —the friendless Spanish waif thrown on that Puritan coastthat afterward figured as ... spirits , and their faand be intent on her thoughts vorite amusement when they - perhaps , if in her own chanced to ...

The Outlook


Race and Religion in Early Nineteenth Century America 1800 1850

Yankee Channing they were figments of the imagination at best -- and worse than unrewarding at the very least . His deprecation of the deep and abiding political potential of sacred Calvinism and secular - religious Puritanism left ...

Race and Religion in Early Nineteenth Century America  1800 1850


New Outlook

... and going to see “ an estate —the friendless Spanish waif thrown on that Puritan coastthat afterward figured as that ... the conversation genial spirits , and their faand be intent on her thoughts vorite amusement when they -perhaps ...

New Outlook


The Independent

It must be biblical by the spirit of the the first three , but only in all four of these ** Friendships may change ... while an imagination Competition encourages pretense , and ligious printing ; that is as luminous as vision throws ...

The Independent


America History and Life

America  History and Life

Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

The New Yorker

Progressive secularization is of good , embodied only in the actions and | Arcati in “ Blithe Spirit , ” Mrs. Malaprop Delbanco's inevitable theme , as the na- hearts of sinners . The Puritans ...

The New Yorker


Harper s Weekly

It is a spirit Bethune . The outside meetings were highly interestas anti - Puritan as the music of the Miserere ; and ing , several speakers of distinction and popularity enout being robbed once or more : equally impos- the tariff of ...

Harper s Weekly