Rabies in the Tropics

Main entry under title: Rabies in the tropics. Proceedings of an international conference on rabies control in the tropics, held at the Hilton Hotel, Tunis, Oct. 3–6, 1983. English and French. Includes bibliographies and indexes. 1.

Rabies in the Tropics

Rabies-as in former times-is still today a major killer affecting man and animals especially in many tropical and sub-tropical countries of Asia, Africa and South America. Some 50,000 people and literally millions of animals suffer and die of this disease each year. This dramatic death toll and the enormous economic losses which ensue are nowadays un tolerable and no longer justified. Worldwide strategy for Rabies control has been established and the World Health Organization recently formulated an elimination programme for dog Rabies. Methods for wildlife Rabies control are also under way. For the realisation of control campaigns, careful epid emiological analysis is necessary. This involves: - antigenical characterisation of Rabies Virus Strains using monoclonal antibodies, - observation of foci, - follow-up of the front wave of the disease, - specific ecology of target populations and Rabies carrier species. The financial point of view of such campaigns has of course to be ascertained. It is for the first time ever that representatives and specialists of different biological disciplines from nearly 70 countries have had the opportunity in Tunis to discuss these important issues and to evaluate, on the basis of their own experimental results and personal epidemiological observations, the possibility of ultimate elimination of Rabies in tropical and sub-tropical countries and also to contribute their share for a better understanding of the natural history of this disease.

Rabies in the Tropics

Rabies in the Tropics


Diseases of Cattle in the Tropics

The number of infected cattle and human exposures follow the same cyclic patterns when rabies prevalence is followed over a number of years. Epidemiology The epidemiology of rabies will vary depending on the vector species that is ...

Diseases of Cattle in the Tropics

Most of the future increase in livestock production is expected to occur in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Cattle are the most numerous of the ruminant species in the tropics and provide the largest quantity of animal food products. More than one-third of the world's cattle are found in the tropics. Disease is the major factor which prohibits full utilization of these regions for cattle production. Various infectious and transmissible viral, rick ettsial, bacterial, and particularly protozoan and helminthic diseases, are widespread in the tropics and exert a heavy toll on the existing cattle industry there. This uncontrolled disease situation also discourages investment in cattle industries by private and government sectors. In Africa alone, it is estimated that 125 million head of cattle could be accommodated in the tropical rainbelt if the disease and other animal husbandry factors could be resolved. The potential of efficient cattle production under more favorable conditions prompted various international agencies to establish a multi million dollar International Laboratory for Research in Animal Diseases (lLRAD) in Nairobi, Kenya, Africa. In South America, principal sites for raising cattle are shifting to the savannah lands because the more fertile soils are being used for crop produc tion, however, in the savannahs also, disease remains the most powerful deterrent in implementing the cattle industry.

Zoonoses and Communicable Diseases Common to Man and Animals

Rabies in the tropics—history and current status. In: Kuwert, E., C. Merieux, H. Koprowski, K. Bögel, eds. Rabies in the Tropics. Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1985. Aguilar-Setien, A., Y.C. Leon, E.C. Tesoro, R. Kretschmer, B. Brochier, ...

Zoonoses and Communicable Diseases Common to Man and Animals

In recent years, zoonoses and communicable diseases common to man and animals have gained increasing attention worldwide. Human diseases that have their origins in infected animals, such as AIDS or Creutzfeldt-Jakob, have highlighted the need for a better understanding of animal diseases in terms of their epidemiology, mechanism of transmission to man, diagnosis, prevention and control. Encroachment into formerly little known ecological areas has increased exposure to such diseases. Also, the speed of modern travel facilitates the spread of the diseases once confined to specific geographic areas. Animal migration and trade pose a similar threat. This new edition provides a detailed overview of the most important zoonotic diseases including: its first appearance, most important outbreaks, latest scientific knowledge, and causative agents. It includes etiology, geographic distribution, symptoms and occurrence in man and animals, source of infection, mode of transmission, role of animals in the epidemiology of the disease, diagnostic techniques and prevention and control measures; name and number according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD -10.). It also includes an index covering synonyms and etiologic agents' names.

Rabies

Epidemiology of paralytic bovine rabies and bat rabies. Bulletin de l' Office International des Epizooties 67, 343–382. Acha, P.N. and Arambulo, P.V. III (1985). Rabies in the Tropics – history and current status.

Rabies

Rabies is the most current and comprehensive account of one of the oldest diseases known that remains a significant public health threat despite the efforts of many who have endeavored to control it in wildlife and domestic animals. During the past five years since publication of the first edition there have been new developments in many areas on the rabies landscape. This edition takes on a more global perspective with many new authors offering fresh outlooks on each topic. Clinical features of rabies in humans and animals are discussed as well as basic science aspects, molecular biology, pathology, and pathogenesis of this disease. Current methods used in defining geographic origins and animal species infected in wildlife are presented, along with diagnostic methods for identifying the strain of virus based on its genomic sequence and antigenic structure. This multidisciplinary account is essential for clinicians as well as public health advisors, epidemiologists, wildlife biologists, and research scientists wanting to know more about the virus and the disease it causes. * Offers a unique global perspective on rabies where dog rabies is responsible for killing more people than yellow fever, dengue fever, or Japanese encephalitis * More than 7 million people are potentially exposed to the virus annually and about 50,000 people, half of them children, die of rabies each year * New edition includes greatly expanded coverage of bat rabies which is now the most prominent source of human rabies in the New World and Western Europe, where dog rabies has been controlled * Recent successes of controlling wildlife rabies with an emphasis on prevention is discussed * Approximately 40% updated material incorporates recent knowledge on new approaches to therapy of human rabies as well as issues involving organ and tissue transplantation * Includes an increase in illustrations to more accurately represent this diseases’ unique horror

The Natural History of Rabies

Barth, R., Gruschkau, H., and Jaeger, O., Chick-embryo-cell inactivated rabies vaccine for veterinary use. Laboratory and field experience, in Rabies in the Tropics, Kuwert, E., Merieux, C., Koprowski, H., and Bogel, Κ., Eds., ...

The Natural History of Rabies

This book provides essential worldwide reference information regarding rabies for public health officials, veterinarians, physicians, virologists, epidemiologists, infectious disease specialists, laboratory diagnosticians, and wildlife biologists. The book is divided into six main sections, covering topics such as the rabies virus, including antigenic and biochemical characteristics; pathogenesis, including the immune response to the infection, pathology, and latency; diagnostic techniques; rabies epidemiology in a variety of wild and domestic animals; rabies control, including vaccination of wild and domestic animals, as well as control on the international level; and finally a discussion of rabies in humans, local wound and serum treatment, and human post-exposure vaccination. Natural History of Rabies, First Edition has been the principal worldwide reference since 1975. The new Second Edition has been completely updated, providing current information on this historically deadly disease.

Neurology in Tropics e Book

Ugolini G. Specificity of rabies virus as a transneuronal tracer of motor networks: Transfer from hypoglossal motor neurons to connected second order and higher order central nervous system cell groups. J Comp Neurol 1995;356:457–80.

Neurology in Tropics  e Book


Taking the Bite out of Rabies

Rabies in the Tropics: History and current status. In E. Kuwert, C. Mérieux, H. Koprowski, & K. Bögel (Eds.), Rabies in the Tropics (pp. 343–359). Berlin, Germany: Springer. Anderson, R. M., Jackson, H. C., May, R. M., & Smith, ...

Taking the Bite out of Rabies

Taking the Bite out of Rabies records the evolution of rabies management and control in Canada.

Recent Developments in Prophylactic Immunization

A case of human rabies with prolonged survival. Intervirology, 1, 60–72 . MMWR. (1977). Human rabies, Texas, 26, 31 Lintjorn, B. (1982). Clinical features of rabies in man. Tropical Doctor, 12, 9–12 WHO. (1982).

Recent Developments in Prophylactic Immunization

It has been said that "never in the history of human progress has a better and cheaper method of preventing illness been developed than immunization". This is well illustrated by the WHO Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) which in developing countries is now preventing nearly a million deaths annually from measles, pertussis and neonatal tetanus, and for which there is a commitment by the WHO and UNICEF to protect all children by immunization by the end of the decade. This enormous undertaking will be facilitated by the rapid advances in molecular biology and recombinant DNA technology, in the understanding of immunological mechanisms and by the production and application of monoclonal antibodies so that the structure and location of important antigenic determinants or epitopes can be determined. Chemical synthesis of oligopeptides has been simplified, and computer programmes and X-ray crystallography provide the tools for the determination of three-dimensional structure of proteins, so that the structure and location of important antigenic determinants or epitopes can be predicted. These techniques have opened the way to the improvement of existing vaccines and to the development and production of new vaccines against infections for which vaccines are not available. New vaccines under development include vaccines against hepatitis B, hepatitis A, malaria, vaccines for typhoid, cholera, rota virus infection and other diarrhoeal diseases, leprosy, rabies, the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), rubella, EB virus, schistosomiasis and other infections. These recent developments are discussed in the volume by internationally recognized experts assembled from several countries.

Clinical and Molecular Aspects of Neurotropic Virus Infection

Nicholson, K. In: Rabies, A Growing Threat (Ed. J.R. Pattison), Won Nostrand Reinhold (UK) Co. Ltd, 1983, pp. 6-17. Acha, P.N. and Arambulo, P.W. III. In: Rabies In The Tropics (Eds. E. Kuwert, C. Merieux, H. Koprowski and K. Bogel), ...

Clinical and Molecular Aspects of Neurotropic Virus Infection

In the summer of 1984, both of us were working with Professor Yechiel Becker in the Laboratory for Molecular Virology at the Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical center in Jerusalem. During a discussion about the increasing number of specialized journals and monographs, Dr. Becker pointed out that none covered both the clinical and molecular aspects of neurotropic virus infections, and he urged us to develop such a book with the help of colleagues who were conducting highly-regarded research in their individual areas related to neurotropic viruses. The responses to our request were gratifying, and each contribution provided both a comprehensive clinical description of the neurologic disease produced by a specific virus and an up-to-date review of the current research in the pathogenesis of the disease, with particular attention given to molecular mechanisms. Most, but not all chapters were written by clinical neurologists who applied basic science strategies and methodologies to the question of how neurotropic viruses produce disease. other chapters were written by virologists known for their longstanding commitment and expertise in the analysis of the pathogenesis of neurotropic virus infections. Thus, this unique monograph should be valuable to all clinicians caring for patients with CNS viral diseases and to "neurovirologists" needing an update of the clinical and molecular pathogenesis of neurotropic virus infections. While this monograph was being prepared, a rapidly expanding literature indicated that the human lenteviruses, human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and HTLV-1 were highly neurotropic.

Wildlife and Emerging Zoonotic Diseases The Biology Circumstances and Consequences of Cross Species Transmission

Kariuki DP, Ngulo WK (1985) Epidemiology of animal rabies in Kenya (1900–1983). In: Kuwert E, Mérieux C, Koprowski H, Bögel K (eds) Rabies in the tropics. SpringerVerlag, Berlin Heidelberg New York Kemp GE, Causey OR, Moore DL, ...

Wildlife and Emerging Zoonotic Diseases  The Biology  Circumstances and Consequences of Cross Species Transmission

This volume offers an overview of the processes of zoonotic viral emergence, the intricacies of host/virus interactions, and the role of biological transitions and modifying factors. The themes introduced here are amplified and explored in detail by the contributing authors, who explore the mechanisms and unique circumstances by which evolution, biology, history, and current context have contrived to drive the emergence of different zoonotic agents by a series of related events.

Rabies

In E. Kuwert, C. Merieux, H. Koprowski, & K. Bogel (Eds.), Rabies in the tropics (pp. 49–53). Berlin: Springer-Verlag. Schneider, L. G., & Cox, J. H. (1994). Bat lyssaviruses in Europe. Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, ...

Rabies

Rabies: Basis of the Disease and Its Management, Fourth Edition is an authoritative reference on the current status of rabies, including the virological, clinical, and public health aspects and management recommendations. Rabies remains one of the most important global public health problems worldwide. Although many important developments have been made over the past century to combat this disease, rabies has become a re-emergent infection in the resource-constrained countries. The Fourth Edition updates this classic reference with comprehensive coverage of the molecular virology, pathogenesis, immunology, vaccines, public health aspects, and epidemiology of rabies and is completely revised, with new chapters that will cover historical developments in rabies intervention strategies, the evolution of rabies virus, modeling rabies control, and on the strategy for rabies elimination. Rabies, Fourth Edition, provides physicians, veterinarians, public health advisors, epidemiologists, and research scientists with a single source for authoritative and up-to-date information on the diagnosis, treatment, control, and prevention of this fatal infectious virus. Edited by renowned researchers in this subject and has gathered a team of experts to detail the science, treatment, and control of rabies Completely revised, the Fourth Edition presents rabies as a re-emergent infection with emphasis on a global perspective of the disease Includes new chapters the evolution of the rabies virus and on modeling rabies control and includes many full-color figures that highlight important information

Natural History of Vampire Bats

Manrique, G. and Parra, A. D., Controle de la Rage en Colombia, in Rabies in the Tropics, Kuwert, E et al., Eds., SpringerVerlag, Heidelberg, 1985, 592 Mitchell, G. C. and Burns, R. J., Chemical control of vampire bats, ...

Natural History of Vampire Bats

A major problem with vampire bats is that whatever information exists is scattered throughout the literature or is not recorded. There are some excellent books on the ecology and biology of bats with very little on vampire bats. This volume fills that gap to provide an in-depth presentation of these unique animals.

Applied Virology

In “Rabies in the Tropics” (Tunis Congress). Lang, R. (1974). Symp. Immunobiol. Stand. 21, 347—370. Larghi, O. P., and Fuenzalida, E. (1972). Ann. Inst. Pasteur Paris 123, 421—426. Larghi, O. P., VareIa-Diaz, V. M., Soto, E., Imas B., ...

Applied Virology

Applied Virology covers the practical applications of the developments in basic virology, not only to virology but to other disciplines as well, and demonstrates the impact of virus diseases on the environment, economy, and the health of man, animals, and plants. The book discusses topics on new virus vaccine technology and chemotherapy; the status of vaccination against viral diseases; and the epidemiology and diagnosis of viral diseases. The text provides information on the strategy used to produce virus vaccines; on antiviral chemical compounds; on simple, rapid, and specific diagnostic techniques; and on epidemiology in relation to the prevention and control of virus diseases. Noninfectious, synthetized peptides used as safe virus vaccines are reviewed with special attention to their immunogenicity, multispecificity, and usefulness in case of epidemics. Virologists will find the book useful.

Medical Virology 9

Nature 256,495-497. Koprowski H (1988) Glimpses into the future of rabies research. Rev Infect Dis 10 (Suppl 4):S810-S813. Kuwert E, Merieux C, Koprowski H, Bögel K (Eds)(1985) Rabies in the Tropics. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, ...

Medical Virology 9

It would have been difficult at the beginning of the 80's to have predicted that by the end of the decade, Medical Virology would have become one of the most important topics in the area of both basic and clinical research. Although we were expecting a progressive increase in awareness of the role played by viruses in different diseases, we did not expect the outbreak of a fatal disease that was going to shake the roots of our society. The appearance of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in the early 80's, has prompted a unique re search impetus in the area of Medical Virology. The knowledge that we are gaining in our attempt to understand the biology of HIV-1 and the immuno logical response to this virus should not only help us control the spread of this virus, but should also help us to better understand other viral infections. Let us hope that during the 1990's we can learn how to control HIV-1 infections so that by the end of the decade, no more human lives succumb to an infection with this virus. Luis M. de la Maza Irvine, California Ellena M. Peterson March, 1990 v ACKNO~EDGEMENTS We would like to thank all the speakers that came to San Francisco and shared their knowledge during the lectures and for writing the chapters in this book.

Infectious Diseases of Wild Mammals

The epidemiology of rabies in Indonesia. In Rabies in the tropics, ed. E. Kuwert, C. Mérieux, H. Koprowski, and K. Bogel. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, pp. 545-555. Koprowski, H. 1996. The mouse inoculation test. In Laboratory techniques in ...

Infectious Diseases of Wild Mammals

Infectious Diseases of Wild Mammals, Third Edition presents the latest information on the diagnosis and treatment of infectious disease in both free-ranging and captive wild mammals. Editors Elizabeth Williams and Ian Barker have recruited 71 contributors, all noted experts in their fields, to update this new edition. This reference provides valuable information on each disease, including Etiology History Distribution Epidemiology Clinical signs Pathology Immunity Diagnosis Treatment Control This latest edition is a leading reference book for Wildlife biologists, managers, and rehabilitators Biology students Conservationists Public health workers

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Neurological Diseases in Tropics

The term rabies is derived from the old Indian root word rabh, meaning to 'make violent'. The disease is also known as hydrophobia or aquifuga.125 It is caused by neurotropic RNA viruses in the family Rhabdoviridae, ...

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Neurological Diseases in Tropics

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a scan that uses strong magnetic fields and radio waves to produce detailed images of the inside of the body. This book is a comprehensive guide to the diagnosis and management of neurological infectious diseases using MRI. Divided into four sections, the text begins with an introduction to tropical diseases of the central nervous system, and their epidemiology. The second section provides in depth coverage of the technique of MRI, from the basic principles, to clinical application and more advanced features. The following sections describe use of the technique for both infectious diseases, including tuberculosis, HIV and parasitic diseases; and noninfectious conditions, such as stroke, poisoning and epilepsy. Each chapter features numerous MRI and pathological images and extensive references. Key points Comprehensive guide to diagnosis and management of neurological infectious diseases in tropics using MRI In depth coverage of the technique, from basics to more advanced aspects Covers MRI for both infectious and noninfectious conditions Includes nearly 300 MRI and pathological images

Advances in Virus Research

In "Rabies in the Tropics" (E. Kuwert, C. Merieux, H. Koprowski, and K. Bogel, eds.), pp. 30-39. SpringerVerlag, Berlin. Lafon, M., and Sureau, P. (1988). In "Impact of Viral Diseases on the Development of Asian Countries" (E. Kurstak ...

Advances in Virus Research

Advances in Virus Research

Dogs Zoonoses and Public Health

Acha, P.N. and Arambulo III, P.V. (1985) Rabies in the tropics - history and current status. In: Kuwert, E., Mérieux, C., Koprowski, H. and Bögel, K. (eds) Rabies in the Tropics. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Germany, Animal Health Australia ...

Dogs  Zoonoses and Public Health

Zoonotic diseases constitute a public health problem throughout the world. Addressing a little studied area of veterinary and medical science, this book covers the viruses, bacteria and protozoan and helminth parasites that are transmitted between man and dogs, discussing population management, control disease agents and human-dog relationships. Fully updated throughout, this new edition also includes two new chapters on benefits of the human-dog relationship and non-infectious disease issues with dogs. It is a valuable resource for researchers and students of veterinary and human medicine, microbiology, parasitology and public health.