Race in the 21st Century

Ethnographic Approaches

Race in the 21st Century

What is the state of race relations in the U.S.? Are we making progress toward ending racial discrimination and prejudice? What, exactly, does "race" mean? In Race in the 21st Century: Ethnographic Approaches, John Hartigan takes an anthropological look at questions such as these by introducing students to the study of race through qualitative approaches. In the first text to take an explicitly ethnographic approach, Hartigan summarizes and explains the current state of social science knowledge on race in the United States. In the process of surveying this research, Hartigan guides readers to think through basic important questions about race in relation to their own circumstances. Unlike many texts, however, this one focuses not on essential differences between racial or ethnic groups, but rather on the commonalities. The author concentrates on the particular contexts where people actively engage and respond to racial meanings and identities. In this way, he encourages readers to think critically about the meaning of race. Ideal for undergraduate courses in race and ethnicity, the anthropology of race, and cultural/human diversity, Race in the 21st Century seamlessly brings together classic and contemporary studies in one accessible volume. The author is also hosting a companion website http://www.raceinthe21stcentury.com/ that features useful web links, sample assignments, and reviews of ethnographies not covered in the text.

Race in the 21st Century

Ethnographic Approaches

Race in the 21st Century

What is the state of race relations in the U.S.? Are we making progress toward ending racial discrimination and prejudice? What, exactly, does "race" mean? In Race in the 21st Century: Ethnographic Approaches, Second Edition, John Hartigan, Jr., takes an anthropological look at such questions by introducing students to the study of race through qualitative methods. In the first text to take an explicitly ethnographic approach, Hartigan summarizes and explains the current state of social science knowledge on race in the U.S., motivating students to think through essential questions about race in relation to their own lives. In contrast with many texts, Race in the 21st Century focuses not on essential differences between racial or ethnic groups, but rather on the commonalities. Hartigan concentrates on the particular contexts in which people actively engage and respond to racial meanings and identities. In this way, he encourages readers to think critically about the meaning of race. The second edition of Race in the 21st Century features a new chapter, "Postracial America," which examines contentious arguments about whether or how race still matters in the U.S. today. It engages students fully in the important question of what "postracial America" might mean or look like.

New Directions in Race, Ethnicity and Crime

New Directions in Race, Ethnicity and Crime

The disproportionate criminalisation and incarceration of particular minority ethnic groups has long been observed, though much of the work in criminology has been dominated by a somewhat narrow debate. This debate has concerned itself with explaining this disproportionality in terms of structural inequalities and socio-economic disadvantage or discriminatory criminal justice processing. This book offers an accessible and innovative approach, including chapters on anti-Semitism, social cohesion in London, Bradford and Glasgow, as well as an exploration of policing Traveller communities. Incorporating current empirical research and new departures in methodology and theory, this book also draws on a range of contemporary issues such as policing terrorism, immigration detention and youth gangs. In offering minority perspectives on race, crime and justice and white inmate perspectives from the multicultural prison, the book emphasises contrasting and distinctive influences on constructing ethnic identities. It will be of interest to students studying courses in ethnicity, crime and justice.

Cultural Politics and Resistance in the 21st Century

Community-Based Social Movements and Global Change in the Americas

Cultural Politics and Resistance in the 21st Century

Cultural Politics and Resistance in the 21st Century demonstrates that twenty-first-century social struggles organize themselves around a distinct set of political discourses and practices. By analyzing the cases present in this volume, the editors develop important steps towards a theory of social change that can adequately address the complex realities and intersectionality of identity (race, gender, class, sexuality, nationality) within and among these new movements.

Canadian Counselling and Counselling Psychology in the 21st Century

Canadian Counselling and Counselling Psychology in the 21st Century

Canadian counsellors and counselling psychologists have made significant advances in mental health services and the broader field of applied psychology, but much of the counselling and counselling psychology scholarship has been published outside of Canada, rendering it difficult to identify as distinctly Canadian. This path-breaking book highlights the work of Canadian counsellors and counselling psychologists and focuses on issues pertinent to practising in Canada. Key topics such as scientific issues, health, wellness, prevention, career psychology, assessment, training and supervision, and social justice and multiculturalism are explored in detail. Using a strength-based framework, each chapter attends to societal factors, diversity of methodological frameworks, and an analysis of the challenges and future directions for the disciplines. Providing a common voice for a diverse group of students and professionals, Canadian Counselling and Counselling Psychology in the 21st Century will be of interest to counsellor educators, faculty in counsellor and counselling psychology training programs, and counsellors interested in advancing their understanding of the current state of the field. Contributors include Kevin G. Alderson (University of Calgary), Nancy Arthur (University of Calgary), Bill Borgen (University of British Columbia), Marla Buchanan (University of British Columbia), Erin Buhr (Trinity Western University), Lee Butterfield (Adler School of Professional Psychology), Sharon Cairns (University of Calgary), Sandra Collins (Athabasca University), Jose Domene (University of New Brunswick), Marilyn Fitzpatrick (McGill University), Nick Gazzola (University of Ottawa), Freda Ginsberg (SUNY Plattsburgh), Liette Goyer (Universite Laval), Bryan Hiebert (University of Victoria), George Hurley (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Anusha Kassan (University of British Columbia), Patricia Keats (Simon Frazer University), Audrey Kinzel (University of Saskatoon), Vivian Lalande (University of Calgary, Sasha Lerner (McGill University), Anne Marshall (University of Victoria), Marv McDonald (Trinity Western University), Louise Overington (McGill University), Jane M. Oxenbury (Independent Practice), Sharon Robertson (University of Calgary), Ada L. Sinacore (McGill University), Suzanne L. Stewart (OISE, University of Toronto), and Jessica Van Vliet (University of Alberta).

The Future of Visual Anthropology

Engaging the Senses

The Future of Visual Anthropology

From an eminent author in the field, The Future of Visual Anthropology develops a new approach to visual anthropology and presents a groundbreaking examination of developments within the field and the way forward for the subdiscipline in the twenty-first century. The explosion of visual media in recent years has generated a wide range of visual and digital technologies which have transformed visual research and analysis. The result is an exciting new interdisciplinary approach of great potential influence for the future of social/cultural anthropology. Sarah Pink argues that this potential can be harnessed by engaging visual anthropology with its wider contexts, including: the increasing use of visual research methods across the social sciences and humanities the growth in popularity of the visual as methodology and object of analysis within mainstream anthropology and applied anthropology the growing interest in 'anthropology of the senses' and media anthropology the development of new visual technologies that allow anthropologists to work in new ways. This book has immense interdisciplinary potential, and is essential reading for students, researchers and practitioners of visual anthropology, media anthropology, visual cultural studies, media studies and sociology.

Harlem on Our Minds

Place, Race, and the Literacies of Urban Youth

Harlem on Our Minds

Ginwright examines the role of community based organizations (CBOs) in the lives and development of black urban youth. The author argues that these organizations have the potential to provide a powerful influence in "how young people choose to participate in schooling and civic life." Ginwright bases his observations on a five-year study of a CBO he created in Oakland, California. The book shows readers that the lives of poor, black, urban youth are not quite as determined by locale and income as more deterministic readings have argued, and that there is real hope for positive change in these urban communities.

21st Century Geography

21st Century Geography

This is a theoretical and practical guide on how to undertake and navigate advanced research in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

Working-class White

The Making and Unmaking of Race Relations

Working-class White

"Fresh and thought-provoking. McDermott contributes to the understanding of how even small daily encounters can be powerfully affected by racial stereotypes and preconceptions."--Julia Wrigley, author of Other People's Children "A true 'insider's' account of how many whites now live and negotiate the color-line, McDermott deftly lifts the veil of the public ideology of tolerance to reveal the gritty durability of the racial divide. This book provides an important new sociological approach on racial attitudes and relations."--Lawrence D. Bobo, Martin Luther King Jr. Centennial Professor, Stanford University "This bold new urban ethnography reveals the meaning of whiteness for the working class in their everyday lived experiences. McDermott offers an insightful, honest, and comprehensive account of everyday black-white interactions. This is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the tangled realities of race and class in 21st century America."--Mary C. Waters, author of Black Identities: West Indian Immigrant Dreams and American Realities "Working Class White is an essential read for anyone concerned about the enduring problem of race in America."--Katherine S. Newman, author of Chutes and Ladders: Navigating the Low Wage Labor Market

Gypsies and the British Imagination, 1807-1930

Gypsies and the British Imagination, 1807-1930

Gypsies and the British Imagination, 1807-1930, is the first book to explore fully the British obsession with Gypsies throughout the nineteenth century and into the twentieth. Deborah Epstein Nord traces various representations of Gypsies in the works of such well-known British authors John Clare, Walter Scott, William Wordsworth, George Eliot, Arthur Conan Doyle, and D. H. Lawrence. Nord also exhumes lesser-known literary, ethnographic, and historical texts, exploring the fascinating histories of nomadic writer George Borrow, the Gypsy Lore Society, Dora Yates, and other rarely examined figures and institutions. Gypsies were both idealized and reviled by Victorian and early-twentieth-century Britons. Associated with primitive desires, lawlessness, cunning, and sexual excess, Gypsies were also objects of antiquarian, literary, and anthropological interest. As Nord demonstrates, British writers and artists drew on Gypsy characters and plots to redefine and reconstruct cultural and racial difference, national and personal identity, and the individual's relationship to social and sexual orthodoxies. Gypsies were long associated with pastoral conventions and, in the nineteenth century, came to stand in for the ancient British past. Using myths of switched babies, Gypsy kidnappings, and the Gypsies' murky origins, authors projected onto Gypsies their own desires to escape convention and their anxieties about the ambiguities of identity. The literary representations that Nord examines have their roots in the interplay between the notion of Gypsies as a separate, often despised race and the psychic or aesthetic desire to dissolve the boundary between English and Gypsy worlds. By the beginning of the twentieth century, she argues, romantic identification with Gypsies had hardened into caricature-a phenomenon reflected in D. H. Lawrence's The Virgin and the Gipsy-and thoroughly obscured the reality of Gypsy life and history.