Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope

Unforgivable cruelty and willed stupidity are called radical evil because by bursting rational bounds of guilt, they cannot be repented ethically. The human possibility of diabolical evil re- visits us as a religious phenomenon after ...

Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope

Opens a way for hope, forgiveness, redemption, and love to spring from evil

Das B se erz hlen

For Bernstein's reading of Kant's theory of radical evil, see ibid., Ch. 1. On Kant, Job and radical evil, cf. M. B. Matuštík: Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope: Postsecular Meditations, Bloomington 2008. 23 Ibid., 21. 24V.

Das B  se erz  hlen

Philosophische Reflexion allein kann das Böse nicht (be-)greifen. Es sind oft Geschichten, die helfen, sich dem Phänomen anzunähern. Der Band hat sich das Ziel gesetzt, ein tieferes Verständnis des Bösen zu erreichen, indem neben philosophischen auch literarische und filmische Zugänge daraufhin befragt werden, was sie uns über das Böse zu erzählen haben, und sie mit philosophischen Theorien in ein produktives Gespräch gebracht werden. Dabei wird sich herausstellen, dass die Philosophie selbst durchaus narrativ und die Narration durchaus reflexiv sein kann. (Quelle: Homepage des Verlags).

Phenomenology and Existentialism in the Twenthieth Century

PHENOMENOLOGY AND THE TASK OF REDEMPTIVE CRITICAL THEORY As Martin Matuštík writes in his recently published book, Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope, “[w]ith ethnic and religious wars and the permanent war on terror in the ...

Phenomenology and Existentialism in the Twenthieth Century

The discussion on the phenomenology of life will continue to be crucial to the general outlook and direction of phenomenological investigations. The imp- tance of it is not only the fact that it is an innovation in the philosophical circle, but it is also an effort that contributes to the re-reading of the hitherto ex- gerated differences between phenomenology and metaphysics. What is new and signi?cant about life is that even though it is evident in the ?ow of the history of philosophy, no philosopher has seriously addressed it. Not many philosophers have said something in particular about life in serious philoso- ical re?ection. The discussion on life by Henri Bergson attests to this and one 3 can hardly point to other deep re?ections elsewhere about the subject. The advantage here about our area is not only that it has extended the horizon of phenomenological thinking, it has also helped to lead phenomenology from the constitutive analysis to a creative impetus that has brought a new point of view to the ?eld, hence raising questions about the general philosophical t- dition from ancient times. This is a reading which my philosophy attempts to investigate about Tymienieckan thought. The emphasis in philosophy till now has been more on reason in its int- lection and pure rational dimension based on the earliest conception of the human person distinguished by rationality.

Redemptive Hope

For more on Kant's philosophy of hope and radical evil, see Martin Beck Matustik, Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008). 53. For more on Kant's rationalization of religion, ...

Redemptive Hope

This is a book about the need for redemptive narratives to ward off despair and the dangers these same narratives create by raising expectations that are seldom fulfilled. The quasi-messianic expectations produced by the election of President Barack Obama in 2008, and their diminution, were stark reminders of an ongoing struggle between ideals and political realities. Redemptive Hope begins by tracing the tension between theistic thinkers, for whom hope is transcendental, and intellectuals, who have striven to link hopes for redemption to our intersubjective interactions with other human beings. Lerner argues that a vibrant democracy must draw on the best of both religious thought and secular liberal political philosophy. By bringing Richard Rorty’s pragmatism into conversation with early-twentieth-century Jewish thinkers, including Martin Buber and Ernst Bloch, Lerner begins the work of building bridges, while insisting on holding crucial differences in dialectical tension. Only such a dialogue, he argues, can prepare the foundations for modes of redemptive thought fit for the twenty-first century.

From Misery to Hope

In sum , the ambiguity in human beings , who though created good become evil because of their attempts to be God ... See Ricoeur , The Symbolism of Evil , 246 and 250 ; and Matušík , Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope , 132–133 .

From Misery to Hope

How can one believe in a God of love amid all the evil and suffering found in the world? How does one do theology 'after Auschwitz', while vast numbers of people still have to endure violent oppression every day? This book seeks to address such questions from a standpoint informed by life in Africa, which in the face of extraordinary difficulties bears witness to Gospel hope by demonstrating forgiveness in action and promoting reconciliation. The work unfolds in two parts. In the first part, a description of the misery that characterises much of life in Africa in the recent past opens up to a theological consideration of the underlying causes and of God's response to them. In the second part, the joy which is so characteristic of life in Africa even in places of immense suffering sets the scene for detailed reflections on liturgy, memory, forgiveness and hope.

Law and Evil

Whitney, Barry, What are they Saying about God and Evil? ... Wodzinski, Cesary, Heidegger i problem zla [Heidegger and the problem of evil]. Warsaw, 1994. ... Maturstik, Martin Beck, Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope.

Law and Evil

Law and Evil opens, expands and deepens our understanding of the phenomenon of evil by addressing the theoretical relationship between this phenomenon and law. Hannah Arendt said 'the problem of evil will be the fundamental question of post-war intellectual life in Europe'. This statement is, unfortunately, more than valid in the contemporary world: not only in the events of war, crimes against humanity, terror, repression, criminality, violence, torture, human trafficking, and so on; but also as evil is used rhetorically to condemn these acts, to categorise their perpetrators, and to justify forcible measures, both in international and domestic politics and law. But what is evil? Evil as a concept is too often taken as something that is self-evident, something that is always already defined. Taking Kant’s concept of radical evil as a starting point, this volume counters such a tendency. Bringing together philosophical, political, and psychoanalytical perspectives, in analysing both the concept and the phenomenon of evil, the contributors to this volume offer a rich and thoroughgoing analysis of the multifaceted phenomenon of evil and its relationship to law.

The Gift of Beauty and the Passion of Being

Silence about this question should not exist at all, if we are honest about the evil itself which, ... Rethinking Evil; Neiman, Evil in Modern Thought; Bernstein, Radical Evil; Matuštík, Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope. 9.

The Gift of Beauty and the Passion of Being

This book gathers a set of reflections on the gift of beauty and the passion of being. There is something surprising about beauty that we receive and that moves the passion of being in us. The book takes issue with an ambiguous attitude to beauty among some who proclaim their advanced aesthetic authenticity. Beauty seems bland and lacks the more visceral thrill of the ugly, indeed the excremental. We crave what disrupts and provokes us, not what gives delight or even consoles. By contrast, attention is given to how beauty arouses enigmatic joy in us, and we enjoy an elemental rapport with it as other. Surprised by beauty, our breath is taken away, but we are more truly there with the beautiful when we are taken outside of ourselves. We are first receivers of the gift of surprise and only then perceivers and conceivers. My attention to the passion of being stresses a patience, a receptivity to what is other. What happens is not first our construction. There is something given, something awakening, something delighting, something energizing, something of invitation to transcendence. The theme is amplified in diverse reflections: on life and its transient beauty; on soul music and its relation to self; on the shine on things given in creation; on beauty and Schopenhauer’s dark origin; on creativity and the dynamis in Paul Weiss’s creative ventures; on redemption in Romanticism in the thought of Stanley Cavell; on theater as a between or metaxu; on redeeming laughter and its connection with the passion of being.

Our Only Hope

Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope: Postsecular Meditations. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008. McIntosh, Mark A. Mystical Theology: The Integrity of Spirituality and Theology. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 1998.

Our Only Hope

The most popular source of theological hope for modern Christians is that of Jurgen Moltmann. Preachers, teachers, and lay people reflect Moltmann's influence, with their hope in a this-worldly eschatology and suffering God. However, an exclusive reliance on that hope deprives the church of crucial resources in the face of global economic, environmental, and military crises. Our Only Hope explores Moltmannian hope and considers its costs before looking elsewhere for additional contributions, from Thomas Aquinas' theological virtue of hope to nihilism and beyond, in order to encourage the church to sustain and practise hope in Jesus Christ, our only hope.

Kantian Antitheodicy

much-discussed theory of radical evil in this chapter. ... On Kant, Job, and radical evil, see also Martin Beck Matuštík, Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope: Postsecular Meditations (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008). 5.

Kantian Antitheodicy

This book defends antitheodicism, arguing that theodicies, seeking to excuse God for evil and suffering in the world, fail to ethically acknowledge the victims of suffering. The authors argue for this view using literary and philosophical resources, commencing with Immanuel Kant’s 1791 “Theodicy Essay” and its reading of the Book of Job. Three important twentieth century antitheodicist positions are explored, including “Jewish” post-Holocaust ethical antitheodicism, Wittgensteinian antitheodicism exemplified by D.Z. Phillips and pragmatist antitheodicism defended by William James. The authors argue that these approaches to evil and suffering are fundamentally Kantian. Literary works such as Franz Kafka’s The Trial, Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot, and George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, are examined in order to crucially advance the philosophical case for antitheodicism.

Evil

Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008. Mayrhofer, Manfred. Etymologisches Wörterbuch des Altindoarischen. Winter: Heidelberg, 1986–2001. McLaughlin, Peter. “Descartes on Mind-Body Interaction ...

Evil

The code of conduct for a leading tech company famously says "Don't Be Evil." But what exactly is evil? Is it just badness by another name--the shadow side of good? Or is it something more substantive--a malevolent force or power at work in the universe? These are some of the ontological questions that philosophers have grappled with for centuries. But evil also raises perplexing epistemic and psychological questions. Can we really know evil? Does a victim know evil differently than a perpetrator or witness? What motivates evil-doers? Satan's rebellion, Iago's machinations, and Stalin's genocides may be hard to understand in terms of ordinary reasons, intentions, beliefs, and desires. But what about the more "banal" evils performed by technocrats in a collective: how do we make sense of Adolf Eichmann's self-conception as just an effective bureaucrat deserving of a promotion? Evil: A History collects thirteen essays that tell the story of evil in western thought, starting with its origins in ancient Hebrew wisdom literature and classical Greek drama all the way to Darwinism and Holocaust theory. Thirteen interspersed reflections contextualize philosophical developments by looking at evil through the eyes of animals, poets, mystics, witches, librettists, film directors, and even a tech product manager. Evil: A History will enlighten readers about one of the most alluring and difficult topics in philosophy and intellectual life, and will challenge their assumptions about the very nature of evil.

New Directions in Jewish American and Holocaust Literatures

11. Michaels, Fugitive Pieces, 109. 12. Ibid., 17. 13. Martin Beck Matuštik, Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope: Postsecular Meditations (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008), 10. 14. It is worth noting that many of the ...

New Directions in Jewish American and Holocaust Literatures

Surveys the current state of Jewish American and Holocaust literatures as well as approaches to teaching them. What does it mean to read, and to teach, Jewish American and Holocaust literatures in the early decades of the twenty-first century? New directions and new forms of expression have emerged, both in the invention of narratives and in the methodologies and discursive approaches taken toward these texts. The premise of this book is that despite moving farther away in time, the Holocaust continues to shape and inform contemporary Jewish American writing. Divided into analytical and pedagogical sections, the chapters present a range of possibilities for thinking about these literatures. Contributors address such genres as biography, the graphic novel, alternate history, midrash, poetry, and third-generation and hidden-child Holocaust narratives. Both canonical and contemporary authors are covered, including Michael Chabon, Nathan Englander, Anne Frank, Dara Horn, Joe Kupert, Philip Roth, and William Styron. “The range of critical approaches and authors examined makes this a valuable resource for scholars and teachers. Particularly in this troubling political moment, meditations on the new and continued relevance of Jewish American and Holocaust literatures for scholars, students, and the American public in general are invaluable.” — Sharon B. Oster, author of No Place in Time: The Hebraic Myth in Late Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Past and Present Political Theology

Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope: Postsecular Meditations. Indianapolis: Indiana University Press. Michalson, Gordon. 1999. Kant and the Problem of God. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. Neill, Alex and Christopher Janaway (eds.).

Past and Present Political Theology

This book demonstrates how discussions of Political Theology have been a constant feature throughout philosophical modernity and that they continue to impact contemporary political debates. By tracing the historical roots and detailing the contemporary outworking of Political Theology in Europe, it contends that this growing field requires a broader "canon" in order for it to mature. Political Theology is shown here to be about the diversity of relationships between religious beliefs and political orientations. First engaging with historical debates, chapters re-examine the relationship between personal conviction and societal orientation on such topics as the will to believe, evil, individualism, the relationship between church and state, and the relationship between belief and natural science. The volume then establishes the relevance of these debates for the present day. As such, it invites engagement on the back and forth between religion and politics in a liberal democracy and a communist state, on how communitarianism relates to religious language, on the diversity of Christian and Jewish political theology, and the politics of toleration. By broadening out the field of Political Theology this book offers the reader a more nuanced understanding of its sustained influence on public life. As such it will be of interest to academics working in Political Theology, but also Theology, Philosophy and Political Science more generally.

Thinking of Questions

If you believe there is 'radical evil', what implications would this have for any view of hope you may hold? Try M. B. Matustik, Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope: Postsecular Meditations, Indiana University Press, 2008. 4.

Thinking of Questions

This is not a conventional book. It is designed to stimulate and challenge all people who are curious to find out about the world they inhabit and their place within it. It does this by suggesting questions and lines of questioning on a wide range of topics. The book does not provide answers or model arguments but prompts people to create their own questions and a reading log or journal. To this end, almost all questions have a list of books or articles to provide a starter for stimulating further reading. Once you start, you will be hooked! Never stop questioning.

The Journal of Speculative Philosophy

But the aggravated scarcity of hope makes hope " impossible ” because one positively wills it so . .. . Yet what can one desire without concept ... What is the relation between any existence of radical evil and a scarcity of hope ?

The Journal of Speculative Philosophy


Camus Philosophe

Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope (Bloomington/Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2008); Sharon Anderson-Gold and Pablo Muchnik (eds). Kant's Autonomy of Evil: Interpretive Essays and Contemporary Applications.

Camus  Philosophe

In Camus, Philosophe: To Return to our Beginnings Matthew Sharpe reads Camus as a philosophe in the classical and enlightenment lineages, arguing that his defense of mesure singles him out amidst 20th century French thought and makes him of renewed relevance today.

Comprehensive Commentary on Kant s Religion Within the Bounds of Bare Reason

Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope: Postsecular Meditations. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. McCarty, Richard. 2009. Kant's Theory of Action. Oxford: Oxford University Press. (Citations are to section numbers.) ...

Comprehensive Commentary on Kant s Religion Within the Bounds of Bare Reason

Palmquist’s Commentary provides the first definitive clarification on Kant’s Philosophy of Religion in English; it includes the full text of Pluhar’s translation, interspersed with explanations, providing both a detailed overview and an original interpretation of Kant’s work. Offers definitive, sentence-level commentary on Kant’s Religion within the Bounds of Bare Reason Presents a thoroughly revised version of Pluhar’s translation of the full text of Kant’s Religion, including detailed notes comparing the translation with the others still in use today Identifies most of the several hundred changes Kant made to the second (1794) edition and unearths evidence that many major changes were responses to criticisms of the first edition Provides both a detailed overview and original interpretation of Kant’s work on the philosophy of religion Demonstrates that Kant’s arguments in Religion are not only cogent, but have clear and profound practical applications to the way religion is actually practiced in the world today Includes a glossary aimed at justifying new translations of key technical terms in Religion, many of which have previously neglected religious and theological implications

Recognizing the Gift

Martin Beck Matuštík outlines a similar concept of “negative saturation” in dialogue with Marion in Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008), 83: “I mean by 'radical evil' the negatively ...

Recognizing the Gift

Recognizing the Gift puts twentieth-century Catholic theological conversations on nature and grace, particularly those of Henri de Lubac and Karl Rahner, into dialogue with Continental philosophy, notably the thought of Jean-Luc Marion and Paul Ricoeur. It argues that a renewed theology of nature and grace must build on the accomplishments of the recent past while acknowledging that an engagement with the political is unavoidable for theology. Ultimately, the aim is to revive and broaden discussion of nature and grace by drawing together the insights of contemporary theologians and Continental philosophers. Too often these areas of inquiry remain quite separate, in part due to differing priorities. This work tries to open that conversation, in part by critically pointing out, in dialogue with Ricoeur, the need in Marion’s work for an acknowledgment of recognition, reciprocity, and the political. It thus argues for a theology of nature and grace in terms of recognition of the gift, drawing out the reciprocal and political nature of gift and givenness in opposition to those, including Marion, who would seek to avoid politics and reciprocity as a proper avenue of inquiry for theology.

M bian Nights

Hope is in relatively short supply these days. There is indeed a “scarcity of hope” as Martin Matuštik notes, so that it is important that we recognize and acknowledge all ... 37 Martin Matuštik, Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope.

M  bian Nights

"I died at Auschwitz,†? French writer Charlotte Delbo asserts, "and nobody knows it.†? Möbian Nights: Reading Literature and Darkness develops a new understanding of literary reading: that in the wake of disasters like the Holocaust, death remains a premise of our experience rather than a future. Challenging customary "aesthetic†? assumptions that we write in order not to die, Sandor Goodhart suggests (with Kafka) we write to die. Drawing upon analyses developed by Girard, Foucault, Blanchot, and Levinas (along with examples from Homer to Beckett), Möbian Nights proposes that all literature works "autobiographically†?, which is to say, in the wake of disaster; with the credo "I died; therefore, I am†?; and for which the language of topology (for example, the "Möbius strip†?) offers a vocabulary for naming the "deep structure†? of such literary, critical, and scriptural sacrificial and anti-sacrificial dynamics.

Kant and Religion

Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. Mendelssohn, Moses (1969). Jerusalem and Other Jewish Writings. Translated and edited by Alfred Jospe. New York: Shocken. Mendelssohn, Moses (1983 [1783]).

Kant and Religion

This masterful work on Kant's Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason explores Kant's treatment of the Idea of God, his views concerning evil, and the moral grounds for faith in God. Kant and Religion works to deepen our understanding of religion's place and meaning within the history of human culture, touching on Kant's philosophical stance regarding theoretical, moral, political, and religious matters. Wood's breadth of knowledge of Kant's corpus, philosophical sharpness, and depth of reflection sheds light not only on Kant, but also on the fate of religion and its relation to philosophy in the modern world.

Imagining Law

Among his books are JurgenHabermas: A Philosophical-Political Profile, Postnational Identity: Critical Theory and Existential Philosophy in Habermas, Kierkegaard, and Havel, and, most recently, Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope: ...

Imagining Law