Reading Matthew with Monks

gain from the text of Matthew by engaging early medieval monastic readers on their own terms? MaTThew 4:1-11 Introduction Matthew 4:1-11 relates the temptation of Jesus in the wilderness by Satan. A self-contained narrative incident, ...

Reading Matthew with Monks

In Reading Matthew with Monks, Derek Olsen seeks to evaluate whether early medieval monastic biblical interpreters can serve as effective conversation partners for modern readers who are committed to broadening their reading of Scripture. Olsen puts the interpretations of four modern Scripture commentaries in conversation with Ælfric of Eynsham’s medieval monastic interpretations of four texts from the Gospel of Matthew. In so doing, he clarifies early medieval interpretive contexts and assesses their usefulness in modern scholarship. As outsiders in modern critical debates, Ælfric and his sources may provide alternative approaches or perspectives that open interpretive possibilities where modern interpreters are locked in disagreement. Early medieval monastic interpreters can serve as excellent guides for understanding the potential for moral, spiritual, or formative meanings of a biblical text. They can help modern readers who are attempting to conform their lives to the biblical text.

Learning as Shared Practice in Monastic Communities 1070 1180

three years ».41 The Regula Magistri explicitly recommends that the monks help each other in memorizing the Psalter.42 Training ... Derek Olsen, Reading Matthew with Monks: Liturgical Interpretation in Anglo-Saxon England, Collegeville, ...

Learning as Shared Practice in Monastic Communities  1070 1180

In this study, Micol Long looks at Latin letters written in Western Europe between 1070 and 1180 to reconstruct how monks and nuns learned from each other in a continuous, informal and reciprocal way during their daily communal life.

Beyond Mary or Martha

This means that the Bible was being read and interpreted within a community of faith whose members were constantly ... 14. see derek olsen, Reading Matthew with Monks: Liturgical Interpretation in Anglo-Saxon England (Collegeville, ...

Beyond Mary or Martha

Explore a tale of two sisters Beyond Mary or Martha: Reclaiming Ancient Models of Discipleship dives into the complicated reception history of Mary and Martha of Bethany, who have been at the center of many debates for almost two thousand years. Jennifer S. Wyant begins her study with a close reading of the sisters’ first encounter with Jesus in Luke 10:38-42, then moves on to patristic, medieval, and modern interpretations of that narrative. Wyant tracks how Mary and Martha both became paradigms of discipleship, revealing the inherent tension within Christianity between contemplative practices and acts of service. By placing ancient debates alongside more modern ones, she argues that, contrary to discussions today within academic and religious circles, gender is not the most important aspect of their story. Features: A thorough examination of the textual variants in the passage to show how variants affected interpretation throughout history Interpretations from medieval women and their contributions to interpretation of Mary and Martha A visual exegesis of the art representing the passage throughout history

The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church The medieval church

These are , after all , the closing words of the Gospel of Matthew . The monks must have known them well ! From the time Gregory the Great sent a band of them to evangelize the Anglo - Saxons , the sons of Saint Benedict had been a ...

The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church  The medieval church

The Reading and Preaching of the Scriptures in the Worship of the Christian Church is a multivolume study by Hughes Oliphant Old that canvasses the history of preaching from the words of Moses at Mount Sinai through modern times. In Volume 1, The Biblical Period, Old begins his survey by discussing the roots of the Christian ministry of the Word in the worship of Israel. He then examines the preaching of Christ and the Apostles. Finally, Old looks at the development and practice of Christian preaching in the second and third centuries, concluding with the ministry of Origen.

Imagining an English Reading Public 1150 1400

This set of associations reveals that there is nothing particularly unusual in Matthew Paris's decision, ... clerks or laymen second.27 Although Matthew wrote in French and Latin for a primarily monastic (and secondarily royal and ...

Imagining an English Reading Public  1150 1400

This original study explores the importance of the concept of habitus - that is, the set of acquired patterns of thought, behavior and taste that result from internalizing culture or objective social structures - in the medieval imagination. Beginning by examining medieval theories of habitus in a general sense, Katharine Breen goes on to investigate the relationships between habitus, language, and Christian virtue. While most medieval pedagogical theorists regarded the habitus of Latin grammar as the gateway to a generalized habitus of virtue, reformers increasingly experimented with vernacular languages that could fulfill the same function. These new vernacular habits, Breen argues, laid the conceptual foundations for an English reading public. Ranging across texts in Latin and several vernaculars, and including a case study of Piers Plowman, this interdisciplinary study will appeal to readers interested in medieval literature, religion and art history, in addition to those interested in the sociological concept of habitus.

The Honey of Souls

The Honey of Souls is the first full-length study of the Explanation of the Psalms by Cassiodorus.

The Honey of Souls

The Honey of Souls is the first full-length study of the Explanation of the Psalms by Cassiodorus. While the Explanation became a seminal document for the monastic movement in the West and was eagerly read and widely quoted for centuries, it has languished in relative obscurity in the modern period. Derek Olsen explores Cassiodorus and his strategies for reading as a window into a spirituality of the psalms that defined early Western biblical interpretation.

Reading Renunciation

troubled by a dispute among some monks in his community.146 One faction had disdained physical labor, citing Jesus' words in Matthew 6 on the carefree habits of the birds of the air and the lilies of the field, who did not sow, reap, ...

Reading Renunciation

A study of how asceticism was promoted through Biblical interpretation, Reading Renunciation uses contemporary literary theory to unravel the writing strategies of the early Christian authors. Not a general discussion of early Christian teachings on celibacy and marriage, the book is a close examination, in the author's words, of how "the Fathers' axiology of abstinence informed their interpretation of Scriptural texts and incited the production of ascetic meaning." Elizabeth Clark begins with a survey of scholarship concerning early Christian asceticism that is designed to orient the nonspecialist. Section Two is organized around potentially troubling issues posed by Old Testament texts that demanded skillful handling by ascetically inclined Christian exegetes. The third section, "Reading Paul," focuses on the hermeneutical problems raised by I Corinthians 7, and the Deutero-Pauline and Pastoral Epistles. Elizabeth Clark's remarkable work will be of interest to scholars of late antiquity, religion, literary theory, and history.

The Fourth Part of the World

Monks in monastery libraries read aloud to themselves, and the din they created would have exasperated modern library patrons. Matthew read to himself, to his fellow monks, and to special guests visiting the monastery, ...

The Fourth Part of the World

"Old maps lead you to strange and unexpected places, and none does so more ineluctably than the subject of this book: the giant, beguiling Waldseemüller world map of 1507." So begins this remarkable story of the map that gave America its name. For millennia Europeans believed that the world consisted of three parts: Europe, Africa, and Asia. They drew the three continents in countless shapes and sizes on their maps, but occasionally they hinted at the existence of a "fourth part of the world," a mysterious, inaccessible place, separated from the rest by a vast expanse of ocean. It was a land of myth—until 1507, that is, when Martin Waldseemüller and Matthias Ringmann, two obscure scholars working in the mountains of eastern France, made it real. Columbus had died the year before convinced that he had sailed to Asia, but Waldseemüller and Ringmann, after reading about the Atlantic discoveries of Columbus’s contemporary Amerigo Vespucci, came to a startling conclusion: Vespucci had reached the fourth part of the world. To celebrate his achievement, Waldseemüller and Ringmann printed a huge map, for the first time showing the New World surrounded by water and distinct from Asia, and in Vespucci’s honor they gave this New World a name: America. The Fourth Part of the World is the story behind that map, a thrilling saga of geographical and intellectual exploration, full of outsize thinkers and voyages. Taking a kaleidoscopic approach, Toby Lester traces the origins of our modern worldview. His narrative sweeps across continents and centuries, zeroing in on different portions of the map to reveal strands of ancient legend, Biblical prophecy, classical learning, medieval exploration, imperial ambitions, and more. In Lester’s telling the map comes alive: Marco Polo and the early Christian missionaries trek across Central Asia and China; Europe’s early humanists travel to monastic libraries to recover ancient texts; Portuguese merchants round up the first West African slaves; Christopher Columbus and Amerigo Vespucci make their epic voyages of discovery; and finally, vitally, Nicholas Copernicus makes an appearance, deducing from the new geography shown on the Waldseemüller map that the earth could not lie at the center of the cosmos. The map literally altered humanity’s worldview. One thousand copies of the map were printed, yet only one remains. Discovered accidentally in 1901 in the library of a German castle it was bought in 2003 for the unprecedented sum of $10 million by the Library of Congress, where it is now on permanent public display. Lavishly illustrated with rare maps and diagrams, The Fourth Part of the World is the story of that map: the dazzling story of the geographical and intellectual journeys that have helped us decipher our world.

Disrupted Patterns

A novel such as Matthew Lewis's The Monk is suggestive of an impressive spectrum of conventional and transgressive ... rather , we as readers are often left translating a series of signifiers , some subtle , some not - rent clothing ...

Disrupted Patterns

This collection of essays explores the significance of modern chaos theory as a new paradigm in literary studies and argues for the usefulness of borrowings from one discipline to another. Its thesis is that external reality is real and is not merely a social construct. On the other hand, this volume reflects the belief that literature, as a social and cultural construct, is not unrelated to that external reality. The authors represented here furthermore believe that learning to communicate across disciplinary divides is worth the risk of looking silly to purists and dogmatists. In applying a contemporary scientific grid to a by-gone era, the authors play out Steven Weinberg's exhortation to mind the clues to the past that cannot be obtained in any other way. It is of course necessary to get the science right, yet the essays in this collection do not seek to do science, but rather to suggest that science and literature often share common assumptions and realities. Thus there is no attempt to legitimize literary study through the adoption of a scientific approach. Interaction between the disciplines requires mutual respect and a willingness to investigate the broader implications of scientific research. Consequently, this volume will be of interest to students and scholars of the long eighteenth century whether the focus is on England (Locke, Milton, Radcliffe, Lewis), France (Crébillion, Diderot, Marivaux, Montesquieu) or Germany (Kant, Moritz, Goethe, Fr. Schlegel). Moreover, given its multiple thrust in employing mythological, philosophical, and scientific notions of chaos, this volume will appeal to historians and philosophers of the European Enlightenment as well as to literary historians. The volume ultimately aspires to promote communication across centuries and across disciplines.

The Song of Songs in the Early Middle Ages

32 Mary Agnes Edsall, Reading like a Monk: Lectio divina, Religious Literature and Lay Devotion ... (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2011), 200–16; Derek A. Olsen, Reading Matthew with Monks: Liturgical Interpretation in ...

The Song of Songs in the Early Middle Ages

Hannah Matis examines how a biblical text was read by the most important figures within the ninth-century Carolingian Reform to think about the nature of Christ and the church.

Historical Writing in England

... Matthew must have known it could have no immediate effect on those it criticized most (the king, magnates and the rest), because they would never read it. But as the Gesta was intended for the monks of St Albans, Matthew no doubt ...

Historical Writing in England

Using a variety of sources including chronicles, annals, secular and sacred biographies and monographs on local histories Historical Writing in England by Antonia Gransden offers a comprehensive critical survey of historical writing in England from the mid-sixth century to the early sixteenth century. Based on the study of the sources themselves, these volumes also offer a critical assessment of secondary sources and historiographical development.

A Monastic Renaissance at St Albans

Monastic reading as Benedict described it was a spiritual exercise, a lectio divina involving intense meditative reflection ... in his De professione monachorum John Matthew defined reading in terms indistinguishable from the Rule of St ...

A Monastic Renaissance at St Albans

A Monastic Renaissance at St Albans is a study of intellectual life at the abbey of St Albans - one of Britain's greatest Benedictine monasteries - during the lifetime of Thomas Walsingham (c.1340-1422), one of the most prolific scholars of the later middle ages. It has always been assumed that the monasteries fell into decline long before the dissolution and that cultural and intellectual activities were largely abandoned as the monks surrendered themselves tohigh living and low morals. This study challenges this view. Drawing on a wide variety of manuscript sources, it shows that education, independent study, and even the co-ordinated copying of books continued to flourish at St Albans (and its affiliate houses) for much of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. In fact theabbey emerged as one of the country's most influential centres of learning, a clearing-house for books and ideas in Ricardian and Lancastrian England.Thomas Walsingham himself played a key part in this renaissance in monastic studies; his works were copied and circulated throughout the St Albans network and his influence acted upon the next generation of monastic readers and writers. Walsingham was not only a compiler of contemporary chronicles but also a Classical scholar of extraordinary originality. His commentary on Ovid's Metamorphoses, his re-working of the histories of Alexander of Macedon and the Trojan War, and hisGenealogia deorum gentilium, are discussed in detail here for the first time. Walsingham's interest in the Classics was shared by many of his St Albans colleagues, and they in turn were members of a wider circle of literary scholars, which included the London schoolmaster, John Seward. The work of these scholars,monastic and secular, points towards a revival of Classical and literary scholarship in England long before Italian humanism and other traces of the continental Renaissance first found their way into the country.

A Disimprisoned Epic

“ The other night I sat up till four o'clock , reading Matthew Lewis's Monk , ” he writes to a friend : “ It is the most stupid & villanous novel that I have read for a great while . Considerable portions of it are grossly indecent ...

A Disimprisoned Epic

In A Disimprisoned Epic, Mark Cumming elucidates the formal genesis of the French Revolution in Carlyle's literary criticism and reestablishes it as an epic experiment in literary form.

Wordsworth s Monastic Inheritance

In this sense, it is not absurd that a poet should invite readers to close their books: reading poetry is valuable but ... WORD SWORTHIAN 'MONKS' In his essay on Heinrich Heine' (1863), Matthew Arnold distinguishes between writers who ...

Wordsworth s Monastic Inheritance

The first extended examination of the influence of monasticism on Wordsworth's writing. Covering the poet's development between 1806 and 1822, it considers how a series of sources describing medieval monastic life in the north of England influenced Wordsworth's thinking about regional attachment, trans-historical community, and national cohesion.

Gonzalo de Berceo and the Latin Miracles of the Virgin

In the late twelfth century a Carthusian monk named Guigo wrote a treatise in part about monastic reading entitled Scala Claustralium1 (The Ladder of Monks). ... are the pure in heart, for they shall see God” (Matthew 5:8).

Gonzalo de Berceo and the Latin Miracles of the Virgin

In Gonzalo de Berceo and the Latin Miracles of the Virgin, Patricia Timmons and Robert Boenig present the first English translation of a twelfth-century Latin collection of miracles that Berceo, the first named poet in the Spanish language, used as a source for his thirteenth-century Spanish collection Milagros de Nuestra Señora. Using the MS Thott 128, close to the one Berceo must have used, Timmons and Boenig provide both translation and analysis, exploring the Latin Miracles, suggesting how it was used as a sacred text, and placing it within the history of Christians' evolving understanding of the Virgin's role in their lives. In addition, this volume explores Berceo's reaction to the Latin Miracles, demonstrating that he reacted creatively to his source texts as well as to changes in Church culture and governance that occurred between the composition of Latin Miracles and the thirteenth century, translating it across both language and culture. Accessible and useful to students and scholars of medieval and Spanish studies, this book includes the original Latin text, translations of the Latin Miracles, including analyses of 'Saint Peter and the Lustful Monk,' 'The Little Jewish Boy,' and 'The Jews of Toledo.'

Chronica Johannis de Reading et Anonymi Cantuariensis

John (of Reading), Stephen Birchington, Johannes (de Reading.), John Of Reading. attributed never had any existence . Matthew Paris , on whose work its earlier portion was founded , became “ Matthew monk of Westminster ” when the St.

Chronica Johannis de Reading et Anonymi Cantuariensis

Excerpt from Chronica Johannis De Reading Et Anonymi Cantuariensis, 1346-1367 II. - The Anonymous Canterbury Chronicle Appendices. A. Extracts from the Westminster chronicle, 1325-45 B. Addition to character of Edward III from Brit. Mus. Addit. Ms. 12118 Chronological Summary of Reading's Chronicle Chronological Summary of the Canterbury Chronicle Chronicon Johannis de Reading Chronicon Anonymi Cantuariensis. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Chronica Johannis de Reading et Anonymi Cantuariensis

Matthew Paris , on whose work its earlier portion was founded , became “ Matthew monk of Westminster ” when the St. Albans origin of the well - known Westminster chronicle was forgotten . At Westminster the St. Albans manuscript was ...

Chronica Johannis de Reading et Anonymi Cantuariensis


Monastic Hospitality

Bishop Silvester of Worcester's confirmation of various appropriations his predecessor had made to Reading Abbey evokes the community's great works of charity . Silvester quotes Matthew 25 : 35 to underline the importance of their ...

Monastic Hospitality

How guests were cared for in medieval monasteries, exploring the administrative, financial, spiritual and other implications.

Life Stories A Guide to Reading Interests in Memoirs Autobiographies and Diaries

Polly, Matthew American Shaolin: Flying Kicks, Buddhist Monks, and the Legend of Iron Crotch; An Odyssey in the New China. Gotham Books, 2008, 2007. 366pp. ill. 16pp. of plates. 9781592403370. Also available in e-book.

Life Stories  A Guide to Reading Interests in Memoirs  Autobiographies  and Diaries

Memoirs, autobiographies, and diaries represent the most personal and most intimate of genres, as well as one of the most abundant and popular. Gain new understanding and better serve your readers with this detailed genre guide to nearly 700 titles that also includes notes on more than 2,800 read-alike and other related titles. • A list of subjects and suggested "read-alikes" accompany each title • Appendixes cover awards, websites, and resources • Detailed indexes provide further points of access

Medievalism

... they were depicted as lazy , and at worst as depraved , as in Matthew Lewis's The Monk of 1796. For educated eighteenthcentury Protestant readers , English monasticism lay below the horizon of worthwhile historical enquiry .

Medievalism

Cover page -- Halftitle page -- Title page -- Copyright page -- Dedication -- Contents -- Illustrations -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Chronology -- Introduction -- Plates -- chapter 1 The Advent of the Goths the medieval in the 1760s -- chapter 2 Chivalry, Romances and Revival chaucer into scott: the lay of the last minstrel and ivanhoe -- chapter 3 Dim Religious Lights the lay, christabel and 'the eve of st agnes' -- chapter 4 'Residences for the Poor' the pugin of contrasts -- chapter 5 Back to the Future in the 1840s carlyle, ruskin, sybil, newman -- chapter 6 'The Death of Arthur was the Favourite Volume' malory into tennyson -- chapter 7 History, the Revival and the PRB westminster, ivanhoe, visions and revisions -- chapter 8 History and Legend the subjects of poetry and painting -- chapter 9 The Working Men and the Common Good madox brown, maurice, morris, hopkins -- chapter 10 Among the Lilies and the Weeds hopkins, whistler, burne-jones, beardsley -- chapter 11 'I Have Seen ... A White Horse' chesterton, yeats, ford, pound -- chapter 12 Modernist Medievalism eliot, pound, jones -- chapter 13 Twentieth-century Christendom waugh, auden, inklings, hill -- epilogue 'Riding through the glen' -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index