Reading William Gilmore Simms

By William Gilmore Simms. The Literary World: A Gazette for Authors, Readers and Publishers (29 Jan. 1847). Rev. of The Life of the Chevalier Bayard; “The Good Knight,” “Sans peur et sans reproche.” By William Gilmore Simms.

Reading William Gilmore Simms

William Gilmore Simms was the best known and certainly the most accomplished writer of the mid-nineteenth-century South. His literary ascent began early, with his first book being published when he was nineteen years old and his reputation as a literary genius secured before he turned thirty. Over a career that spanned nearly forty-five years, he established himself as the American South's premier man of letters—an accomplished poet, novelist, short fiction writer, essayist, historian, dramatist, cultural journalist, biographer, and editor. In Reading William Gilmore Simms, Todd Hagstette has created an anthology of critical introductions to Simms's major publications, including those recently brought back into print by the University of South Carolina Press, offering the first ever primer compendium of the author's vast output. Simms was a Renaissance man of American letters, lauded in his time by both popular audiences and literary icons alike. Yet the author's extensive output, which includes nearly eighty published volumes, can be a barrier to his study. To create a gateway to reading and studying Simms, Hagstette has assembled thirty-eight essays by twenty-four scholars to review fifty-five Simms works. Addressing all the author's major works, the essays provide introductory information and scholarly analysis of the most crucial features of Simms's literary achievement. Arranged alphabetically by title for easy access, the book also features a topical index for more targeted inquiry into Simms's canon. Detailing the great variety and astonishing consistency of Simms's thought throughout his long career as well as examining his posthumous reconsideration, Reading William Gilmore Simms bridges the author's genius and readers' growing curiosity. The only work of its kind, this book provides an essential passport to the far-flung worlds of Simms's fecund imagination.

Long Years of Neglect the Work and Reputation of William Gilmore Simms c

Paul Hamilton Hayne and William Gilmore Simms : Friends , Colleagues , and Members of the Guild RAYBURN S. MOORE As a schoolboy , Paul Hamilton Hayne read William Gilmore Simms's romances , heard Simms make a political speech in 1847 ...

Long Years of Neglect  the Work and Reputation of William Gilmore Simms  c


The Simms Reader

Selections from the Writings of William Gilmore Simms William Gilmore Simms John Caldwell Guilds. reading and keep peace with his grandmother at the same time . The young scholar's initiative here anticipates the drive and inventiveness ...

The Simms Reader

Long considered a leading literary figure of the Old South, William Gilmore Simms (1806-1870) wrote letters, novels, short fiction, drama, essays, and poetry in his prolific career. Born in Charleston to an old South Carolina family of modest means and raised by a grandmother with whom his father left him after his mother's death, Simms felt a simultaneous sense of loyalty to and alienation from his native region. He was a major intellectual figure on the East Coast before the Civil War but saw his New York publishers abandon him after secession, of which he was a vocal supporter. Simms's novels and poetry have been published in modern editions, and he has been the subject of numerous biographies and critical studies, but until now there has been no collection covering the broad spectrum of his writings. The Simms Reader presents a selection of his nonnovelistic work--letters, short fiction, essays, historical writings, poetry, and epigrams--chosen and introduced by the preeminent Simms scholar John Caldwell Guilds.

Imagining Southern Spaces

read as signs of a change in Simms's overall patriotism from unionism to secessionism, I argue that Simms promotes a ... In 2017, J. Weber contributed to T. Hagstette's Reading William Gilmore Simms with a detailed article on the ...

Imagining Southern Spaces

Identifying the antebellum era in the United States as a transitional setting, Imagining Southern Spaces ́investigates spatialization processes about the South during a time when intensifying debates over the abolition of slavery led to a heightened period of (re)spatialization in the region. Taking the question of abolition as a major factor that shaped how different actors responded to these processes, this book studies spatial imaginations in a selection of abolitionist and proslavery literature of the era. Through this diversity of imaginations, the book points to a multitude of Souths in various economic, political, and cultural entanglements in the American Hemisphere and the Circumatlantic. Thus, it challenges monolithic and provincial representations of the South as a provincial region distinct from the rest of the country.

Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms

Due to his cultural loyalty to the South , Simms won praise from Northern readers as a respected creator of belles lettres throughout the first half of the nineteenth century . With the advent of the Civil War , however , Simms's ...

Visions of Order in William Gilmore Simms

One of nineteenth-century America's foremost men of letters, William Gilmore Simms (1806-1870) of Charleston, South Carolina, distinguished himself as a historian, poet, and novelist; yet his stalwart allegiance to the ideals of the Confederacy have kept him largely marginalized from the modern literary canon. In this engaging study, Masahiro Nakamura seeks to reinsert Simms in current American literary and cultural studies through a careful consideration of Simms's southern conservatism as a valuable literary counterpoint to the bourgeois individualist ideology of his northern contemporaries. For Nakamura, Simms's vision of social order runs contrary to the staunch individualism expressed in traditional American romances by authors such as James Fenimore Cooper and Nathaniel Hawthorne. In his thoughtful approaches to Simms's historical depictions of the making of American history and society, Nakamura finds consistent assertions of social order against the perils of literal and metaphoric wilderness, a conservative vision that he traces to the influence of Simms's southern genius loci. To understand how this southern conservatism also manifests itself in Simms's fiction, Nakamura contrasts Simms's historical romances with those of Hawthorne, as representative of the New England romance tradition, to differentiate the ways in which the two writers interpret the dynamic between the individual and society. Nakamura finds that Simms's protagonists struggle to establish their places within their culture while Hawthorne's characters are often at odds with their culture. The resulting comparison enriches our understanding of both writers.

William Gilmore Simms

They had to read sometimes , and tradition and the fact that as aristocrats they were born leaders of men , naturally turned their reading to political lines . They never failed to read the political leaders in their favorite newspaper ...

William Gilmore Simms


Writing War and Reunion

Selected Civil War and Reconstruction Newspaper Editorials by William Gilmore Simms Jeffery J. Rogers ... Reading William Gilmore Simms: Essays of Introduction to the Author's Canon. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2017.

Writing War and Reunion

A collection of Civil War and Reconstruction era journalism by one of the most popular and acclaimed authors of the antebellum South. Nineteenth-century writer William Gilmore Simms was once considered the South’s premier literary figure, with achievements including more than twenty major novels, several volumes of poetry, and biographies of important figures in American history. Less well known are his newspaper writings, which include fascinating and trenchant work from the era of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Writing War and Reunion offers a selection of the best of Simms’s articles and editorials from that period, offering a window into his thoughts on the conflict and its deeply fraught resolution. In the decades following the Civil War, Simms’s reputation suffered a steady decline. Because of his associations with the antebellum South, slavery, and Confederate defeat, as well as changes in literary tastes, Simms came to be regarded as a talented but failed Southern author of a bygone era. Today a robust scholarly literature has reexamined Simms and finds him to have been an important figure in the development of nineteenth-century American literature and worthy of serious study.

William Gilmore Simms s Selected Reviews on Literature and Civilization

William Gilmore Simms James E. Kibler, Jr., David Moltke-Hansen ... The accuser urged that the said Lever was a sort of Proteus in authorship, leaving his readers half the time doubtful where, or in what humor to find him;— that, ...

William Gilmore Simms s Selected Reviews on Literature and Civilization

During William Gilmore Simms’s life (1806–1870), book reviews and critical essays became vital parts of American literary culture and intellectual discourse. Simms was an assiduous reviewer and essayist, proving by example the importance of those genres. William Gilmore Simms’s Selected Reviews on Literature and Civilization publishes for the first time in book form sixty-two examples of the writer’s hundreds of newspaper and periodical reviews and book notes as well as four important critical essays. Together, the reviews and essays reveal the regional, national, and international dimensions of Simms’s intellectual interests. To frame the two distinct parts of Selected Reviews, James Everett Kibler, Jr., and David Moltke-Hansen have written a general introduction that considers the development of book reviewing and the authorship of essays in cultural and historical contexts. In part one, Kibler offers an introduction that examines Simms’s reviewing habits and the aesthetic and critical values that informed the author’s reviews. Kibler then publishes selected texts of reviews and provides historical and cultural backgrounds for each selection. Simms was an early proponent of the critical theories of Romantics such as William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Edgar Allan Poe. Widely read in European history and literature, he reviewed works published in French, German, and classics in original Greek and Latin and in translation. Simms also was an early, ardent advocate of works of local color and of southern “backwoods” humorists of his day. Simms published notices of seven of Herman Melville’s novels, the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, and favorably reviewed Henry David Thoreau’s Walden; or, Life in the Woods. Simms published numerous review essays of twenty thousand or more words in literary journals and also republished two collections in book form. These volumes treated such subjects as Americanism in literature and the American Revolution in South Carolina. Yet, as part two of Selected Reviews demonstrates, Simms ranged much more widely in the intellectual milieu. Such cultural and political topics as the 1848 revolution in France, the history of the literary essay, the roles of women in the American Revolution, and the activities of the southern convention in Nashville in 1850 captured Simms’s attention. Moltke-Hansen’s introduction to part two examines Simms’s roles in, and responses to, the Romantic critical revolution and the other revolutions then roiling Europe and America.

The Letters of William Gilmore Simms 1867 1870

William Gilmore Simms Mary Chevillette Simms Oliphant, Alfred Taylor Odell, Thomas Cary Duncan Eaves ... to them still remain to be corrected , and we believe additional information would in some instances be useful to readers .

The Letters of William Gilmore Simms  1867 1870


William Gilmore Simms s Selected Reviews on Literature and Civilization

These volumes treated such subjects as Americanism in literature and the American Revolution in South Carolina. Yet, as part two of Selected Reviews demonstrates, Simms ranged much more widely in the intellectual milieu.

William Gilmore Simms s Selected Reviews on Literature and Civilization

During William Gilmore Simms's life (1806-1870), book reviews and critical essays became vital parts of American literary culture and intellectual discourse. Simms was an assiduous reviewer and essayist, proving by example the importance of those genres. William Gilmore Simms's Selected Reviews on Literature and Civilization publishes for the first time in book form sixty-two examples of the writer's hundreds of newspaper and periodical reviews and book notes as well as four important critical essays. Together, the reviews and essays reveal the regional, national, and international dimensions of Simms's intellectual interests. To frame the two distinct parts of Selected Reviews, James Everett Kibler, Jr., and David Moltke-Hansen have written a general introduction that considers the development of book reviewing and the authorship of essays in cultural and historical contexts. In part one, Kibler offers an introduction that examines Simms's reviewing habits and the aesthetic and critical values that informed the author's reviews. Kibler then publishes selected texts of reviews and provides historical and cultural backgrounds for each selection. Simms was an early proponent of the critical theories of Romantics such as William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Edgar Allan Poe. Widely read in European history and literature, he reviewed works published in French, German, and classics in original Greek and Latin and in translation. Simms also was an early, ardent advocate of works of local color and of southern "backwoods" humorists of his day. Simms published notices of seven of Herman Melville's novels, the writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson, and favorably reviewed Henry David Thoreau's Walden; or, Life in the Woods. Simms published numerous review essays of twenty thousand or more words in literary journals and also republished two collections in book form. These volumes treated such subjects as Americanism in literature and the American Revolution in South Carolina. Yet, as part two of Selected Reviews demonstrates, Simms ranged much more widely in the intellectual milieu. Such cultural and political topics as the 1848 revolution in France, the history of the literary essay, the roles of women in the American Revolution, and the activities of the southern convention in Nashville in 1850 captured Simms's attention. Moltke-Hansen's introduction to part two examines Simms's roles in, and responses to, the Romantic critical revolution and the other revolutions then roiling Europe and America.

The Nascence of American Literature

Kennedy was an estimable mediocrity, whose faded work, except for some early descriptive passages of Swallow Barn, is scarcely worth reading. WILLIAM GILMORE SIMMS □ 1806-1870 The best of the romancers of the Old South, ...

The Nascence of American Literature

Early Writings about exploration and settlement of America, and discussion of the careers and writings of Edwards, Franklin, Paine, Jefferson, Taylor, Wigglesworth, the Mathers, Byrd, Hamilton, Brown, Freneau, Irving, Cooper, Bryant, and many others. The book traces the progress from writings about America by foreign observers to the emergence of belletristic literature by native Americans.

The New Franklin Fifth Reader

With a New Elocutionary Treatise, Essentials of Reading, by Mark Bailey Loomis Joseph Campbell. XCI . — MARION'S PARTISAN WARFARE . SIMMS . WILLIAM GILMORE SIMMS was born in * tou , South Carolina , April 17 , 1804 , and died there ...

The New Franklin Fifth Reader


American Literature in Transition 1820 1860 Volume 2

29 Todd Hagstette, ed., Reading William Gilmore Simms: Essays of Introduction to the Author's Canon (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2017). 30 Michael D. Green, The Politics of Indian Removal: Creek Government and Society ...

American Literature in Transition  1820   1860  Volume 2

The essays in American Literature in Transition, 1820-1860 offer a new approach to the antebellum era, one that frames the age not merely as the precursor to the Civil War but as indispensable for understanding present crises around such issues as race, imperialism, climate change, and the role of literature in American society. The essays make visible and usable the period's fecund imagined futures, futures that certainly included disunion but not only disunion. Tracing the historical contexts, literary forms and formats, global coordinates, and present reverberations of antebellum literature and culture, the essays in this volume build on existing scholarship while indicating exciting new avenues for research and teaching. Taken together, the essays in this volume make this era's literature relevant for a new generation of students and scholars.

Within the Plantation Household

When in company, she could not read; when alone, she suffered too much from loneliness for him. ... Eliza Clitherall took a more secular pleasure in reading William Gilmore Simms's The Forayers, the revolutionary narratives of which ...

Within the Plantation Household

Documenting the difficult class relations between women slaveholders and slave women, this study shows how class and race as well as gender shaped women's experiences and determined their identities. Drawing upon massive research in diaries, letters, memoirs, and oral histories, the author argues that the lives of antebellum southern women, enslaved and free, differed fundamentally from those of northern women and that it is not possible to understand antebellum southern women by applying models derived from New England sources.

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier

This collection of essays emphasizes his portrayal of America's westward migration.

William Gilmore Simms and the American Frontier

William Gilmore Simms (1807-1870), the antebellum South's foremost author and cultural critic, was the first advocate of regionalism in the creation of national literature. This collection of essays emphasizes his portrayal of America's westward migration.

In Pursuit of a Phantom

Although it is impossible to determine whether Stuart or Mosby ever read William Gilmore Simms's novels, which portrayed guerrilla warfare in South Carolina during the American Revolution, the novelist's works were very popular and ...

In Pursuit of a Phantom


Literary News

From the Boston Gazette . on a reputation he knew to be second to none , mental in good reading or speaking is common ... Its pages are indeed enterWilliam Gilmore Simms was long entitled to taining as well as instructive , and may be ...

Literary News


Cleanth Brooks and Robert Penn Warren

I've been reading William Gilmore Simms in the hope of finding a short story from his The Wigwam and the Cabin that might deserve our reprinting . I'm not sure that I can find anything good enough and short enough at the same time .

Cleanth Brooks and Robert Penn Warren

James A. Grimshaw, Jr., brings together for the first time more than 350 letters exchanged by two scholars who altered the way literature is taught in this country. The selected letters focus on the development of their five major textbooks--the rationale for selections, the details involved in obtaining permissions and preparing indexes, and the demands of meeting deadlines. More important, these letters reveal their attitudes toward literature, teaching, and scholarship. Providing insight into two of the most influential literary minds of this century, these letters show two men who were deeply involved in research and writing, and who were committed to a life of travel, conversation, and learning. Their zest for life and their love of literature explain, in part, their uncanny ability to persevere and to succeed. Yet their human qualities are also present in the letters, which bring Brooks and Warren to life as rare individuals able to sustain a deep, lifelong friendship. Cleanth Brooks and Robert Penn Warren will help readers better understand the critical work of Brooks and the creative work of Warren. Students and teachers of American literature will find this book indispensable.

The Writings of William Gilmore Simms Voltmeier or The mountain men

William Gilmore Simms John Caldwell Guilds, James B. Meriwether. “ And who's ' Mephistopheles ' ? ” " What ! have you never read the “ Fausť of Goethe ? ” “ Never ! ” “ Oh ! how charming ! You ignorant cousin ! Well , I will teach you .

The Writings of William Gilmore Simms  Voltmeier  or  The mountain men