Reclaiming the Sufficiency of Scripture

Reclaiming the Sufficiency of Scripture

Christians share a commitment to the inerrancy of Scripture, but have we slipped on our commitment and understanding of sufficiency? We believe the Bible is true, but do we believe it is enough for every matter of faith and practice? Rob Rienow allows us to reexamine this vital doctrine and understand the foundation it sets for all future ministry. This book asks the reader to go beyond the knowledge of the authority of God's Word and let it shape and determine how ministry is carried out in the life of the church. Rienow gives a concise explanation of the sufficiency of Scripture. He also goes beyond that foundation to examine how it impacts all of ministry. Discover not only what God is calling you to do, but how He wants you to do it.

Why Biblical Counseling?: An Appeal for Scriptural Sufficiency

Why Biblical Counseling?: An Appeal for Scriptural Sufficiency

Why Biblical Counseling? Because God's Word is fully sufficient for the counseling task and is superior to any secular method of care the world can provide. In his new book, Dr. Ab Abercrombie draws a clear contrast between the temporal provision of humanism and the transformational authority of the Bible. The reader is trained and encouraged to think and respond biblically in all matters of biblical care and discipleship, for the restoration of the fallen believer (Gal 6:1-2) and the evangelism of those yet to encounter Christ (Matt 28:19-20). The text serves as an invaluable resource, suitable for pastors, ministry students, and lay leaders within the Church. To learn more about the Biblical Counseling Institute, please visit their website: www.bcinstitute.com

Reclaiming Faith

Essays on Orthodoxy in the Episcopal Church and the Baltimore Declaration

Reclaiming Faith

The essays in this volume together commend the usefulness of traditional Christian language and doctrine for articulating the gospel today. Taking as their point of departure the Baltimore Declaration, a manifesto made by a group of Episcopal priests in 1991; the "post-liberal" theologians contributing to Reclaiming Faith explore such issues as the exclusivity of salvation in Christ, the proper limit to doctrinal reformulation, the authoritative forms of biblical language, and the nature of the church community as a confessing body of Christians.