Reconciliation, Justice, and Coexistence

Theory and Practice

Reconciliation, Justice, and Coexistence

Since the end of the Cold War several political agreements have been signed in attempts to resolve longstanding conflicts in such volatile regions as Northern Ireland, Israel-Palestine, South Africa, and Rwanda. This is the first comprehensive volume that examines reconciliation, justice, and coexistence in the post-settlement context from the levels of both theory and practice. Mohammed Abu-Nimer has brought together scholars and practitioners who discuss questions such as: Do truth commissions work? What are the necessary conditions for reconciliation? Can political agreements bring reconciliation? How can indigenous approaches be utilized in the process of reconciliation? In addition to enhancing the developing field of peacebuilding by engaging new research questions, this book will give lessons and insights to policy makers and anyone interested in post-settlement issues.

Peace and Reconciliation as a Paradigm

A Philosophy of Peace and Its Implications on Conflict, Governance, and Economic Growth in Africa

Peace and Reconciliation as a Paradigm


Transitional Justice Theories

Transitional Justice Theories

Transitional Justice Theories is the first volume to approach the politically sensitive subject of post-conflict or post-authoritarian justice from a theoretical perspective. It combines contributions from distinguished scholars and practitioners as well as from emerging academics from different disciplines and provides an overview of conceptual approaches to the field. The volume seeks to refine our understanding of transitional justice by exploring often unarticulated assumptions that guide discourse and practice. To this end, it offers a wide selection of approaches from various theoretical traditions ranging from normative theory to critical theory. In their individual chapters, the authors explore the concept of transitional justice itself and its foundations, such as reconciliation, memory, and truth, as well as intersections, such as reparations, peace building, and norm compliance. This book will be of particular interest for scholars and students of law, peace and conflict studies, and human rights studies. Even though highly theoretical, the chapters provide an easy read for a wide audience including readers not familiar with theoretical investigations.

Jordanian-Israeli Relations

The Peacebuilding Experience

Jordanian-Israeli Relations

Jordan’s peace treaty with Israel was unique as it bore the promise of what was termed a "warm" peace between the two warring countries. With legitimacy provided by Madrid and Oslo, hopes for "true" peace, as the Israelis would describe it, were high. This book explores the Jordanian-Israeli relations from a Jordanian perspective, focusing on the peacebuilding experience since 1994. In examining the reasons why a warm peace has not developed, the book focuses on the interplay between agency and structure on the Jordanian side, in relation to the Israeli-Palestinian context. In doing so, the book discusses the role of the various Jordanian leadership layers in the process and brings to the light intra-societal dynamics and particularities of the Jordanian social construct. With research based on the premise that international relations are social constructions, meaning that facts are theory-laden and contexts matter to political actors since they influence their understanding of conflict and impact upon their decisions, the book also serves as an example of the application of an inter-disciplinary approach to analyzing conflicts and subsequent peacebuilding experiences. This book will be of interests to students of Politics and International Relations, History, Middle Eastern Studies and Social Studies, in particular those interested in the areas of Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding.

Reconciliation after Terrorism

Strategy, possibility or absurdity?

Reconciliation after Terrorism

Reconciliation after Terrorism brings together scholars from the hitherto disparate fields of terrorism and reconciliation studies, in order to examine whether reconciliation is a possible strategy for dealing with and ending a terrorist conflict. Although terrorist activities often play a role in situations of conflict and transition, terrorists are generally not taken into consideration as active participants by researchers and practitioners. In some cases, the terrorists turn into political actors during the reconciliation process and their past is not an issue anymore, as it was the case with the ANC in South Africa. This book examines the notion of reconciliation with terrorists from a theoretical and empirical perspective. The notion of engagement and reconciliation with terrorist groups is generally seen as problematic, if not impossible. This is somewhat surprising, given that the idea of societal reconciliation has become a common response to state terror- although not usually in situations of conflict with sub-state terrorist actors. Similar to state terror, sub-state terrorism is a sign of a deep societal rift which reconciliation measures may help to overcome. The text investigates the reconciliatory process further, raising the central questions: (a) what constitutes ‘reconciliation’ as a process and an outcome; and (b) how can reconciliation be facilitated in a situation of social conflict. This book will be of much interest to students of terrorism studies, transitional justice, conflict resolution, peace and conflict studies and IR in general. * * *Reconciliation after Terrorism was featured in the Terrorism Bookshelf: Top 150 Books on Terrorism and Counterterrorism, selected and reviewed by Joshua Sinai. -Perspectives on Terrorism , Vol. 6, No 2, 2012* * *

Roads to Reconciliation: Conflict and Dialogue in the Twenty-first Century

Conflict and Dialogue in the Twenty-first Century

Roads to Reconciliation: Conflict and Dialogue in the Twenty-first Century

Unlike other books on conflict resolution that focus on particular places and moments in history, this original work attempts to understand the process from many different perspectives and in many different contexts - from international political conflicts, to racial and religious struggles within one culture, to the internal conflicts of individuals struggling with the desire for revenge in the wake of 9/11. Designed as a starting point for meaningful dialogue on the elusive concept of reconciliation, the book includes views from Christians and Muslims, scholars and politicians, and draws on religion, psychology, cultural studies, education theory, history, and law.

Families of the Missing

A Test for Contemporary Approaches to Transitional Justice

Families of the Missing

Families of the Missing interrogates the current practice of transitional justice from the viewpoint of the families of those disappeared and missing as a result of conflict and political violence. Studying the needs of families of the missing in two contexts, Nepal and Timor-Leste, the practice of transitional justice is seen to be rooted in discourses that are alien to predominantly poor and rural victims of violence, and that are driven by elites with agendas that diverge from those of the victims. In contrast to the legalist orientation of the global transitional justice project, victims do not see judicial process as a priority. Rather, they urgently seek an answer concerning the fate of the missing, and to retrieve human remains. As important are livelihood issues where families are struggling to cope with the loss of breadwinners and seek support to ensure economic security. Although rights are the product of a discourse that claims to be global and universal, needs are necessarily local and particular, the product of culture and context. And it is from this perspective that this volume seeks both to understand the limitations of transitional justice processes in addressing the priorities of victims, and to provide the basis of an emancipatory victim-centred approach to transitional justice.

Routledge Handbook of Heritage in Asia

Routledge Handbook of Heritage in Asia

This Handbook is the first major volume to examine the conservation of Asia’s culture and nature in relation to the wider social, political and economic forces shaping the region today. Throughout Asia rapid economic and social change means the region’s heritage is at once under threat and undergoing a revival as never before. As societies look forward, competing forces ensure they re-visit the past and the inherited, with the conservation of nature and culture now driven by the broader agendas of identity politics, tradition, revival, rapid development, environmentalism and sustainability. In response to these new and important trends, the twenty three accessible chapters here go beyond sector specific analyses to examine heritage in inter-disciplinary and critically engaged terms, encompassing the natural and the cultural, the tangible and intangible. Emerging environmentalisms, urban planning, identity politics, conflict memorialization, tourism and biodiversity are among the topics covered here. This path-breaking volume will be of particular interest to students and scholars working in the fields of heritage, tourism, archaeology, Asian studies, geography, anthropology, development, sociology, and cultural and postcolonial studies.

Reconciling Enemy States in Europe and Asia

Reconciling Enemy States in Europe and Asia

Heo conceptualizes reconciliation in International Relations theory and fills a gap by building a theoretical framework for interstate reconciliation. Combining historical and political scientific approaches, she analyses case studies from Europe, the Middle East, and Northeast Asia.

When Blood and Bones Cry Out

Journeys through the Soundscape of Healing and Reconciliation

When Blood and Bones Cry Out

Around the world communities that have suffered the trauma of unspeakable violence--in Liberia, Somalia, West Africa, Columbia, and elsewhere--are struggling to recover and reconcile, searching for ways not just to survive but to heal. In When Blood and Bones Cry Out, John Paul Lederach, a pioneer of peace-building, and his daughter, Angela Jill Lederach, show how communities can recover and reconnect through the power of making music, creating metaphors, and telling their extraordinary stories of suffering and survival. Instead of relying on more common linear explanations of healing and reconciliation, the Lederachs demonstrate how healing is circular, dynamic, and continuing, even in the midst of ongoing violence. They explore the concept of "social healing," a profoundly important intermediary step between active warfare and reconciliation. Social healing focuses on the lived experience of those who have suffered protracted violence and their need to give voice to that experience, both individually and collectively. Giving voice, speaking the unspeakable, in words and sounds that echo throughout traumatized communities, can have enormous healing power. Indeed, the Lederachs stress the remarkable effects of sound and vibration through tales of Tibetan singing bowls, Van Morrison's transcendent lyrics, the voices of mothers in West Africa, and their own personal journeys. And they include inspiring stories of transformation: a mass women's protest movement in Liberia that forces leaders to keep negotiating until a peace agreement is signed; elders in Somalia who walk between warring clans year after year to encourage dialogue; former child soldiers who run drum workshops and grow gardens in refugee camps; and rape victims in Sierra Leone who express their pain in poetry. With equal measures of insight and compassion, When Blood and Bones Cry Out offers a promising new approach to healing traumatized communities.