The Law And Practice Of The International Court, 1920-2005

The Law And Practice Of The International Court, 1920-2005

The popularity of his monumental and definitive works have established Shabtai Rosenne as the undisputed expert on the International Court of Justice s law and practice. His broad exchange of correspondence and extensive conversations with members of the Court and its Registrars, as well as with other friends who know the Court and its practices well, and his experience in the Court and in the UN, especially the General Assembly and the Security Council, led him to undertake this major reconstruction of this work in the previous edition. Now divided into several substantive volumes, the work addresses: The Court as one of the principal organs, and as the principal judicial organ of the United Nations. Diplomats and legal advisers who have to deal with matters relating to the Court on a political level, in different organs of the United Nations and in other offices will appreciate the full discussion of the diplomatic, political, and administrative aspects of the Court s affairs. Jurisdiction and the treatment of jurisdictional matters by the Court. This volume also includes the Court s advisory jurisdiction; the advisory work has related to very difficult legal issues in matters of major political import. The Court s procedure.All of these arenas have undergone significant recent changes. The work s practical features include the English text of the Charter of the United Nations, the Statute of the Court, the Practice Directions, and the 1978 Rules of the Court, together with a full set of indexes. The Fourth Edition (updated until 31 December 2005) of The Law and Practice of the International Court is an essential component of all international law libraries and an indispensable work for those practicing in the field, all of whom will appreciate access to the most recent work on the Court from this expert author.

The Old Bridge of Mostar and Increasing Respect for Cultural Property in Armed Conflict

The Old Bridge of Mostar and Increasing Respect for Cultural Property in Armed Conflict

Based on the study of the Old Bridge of Mostar, this book concerns the adequacy of the international humanitarian law regime relating to the targeting and destruction of immovable cultural property in armed conflict at both normative and enforcement level.

Brownlie's Documents on Human Rights

Brownlie's Documents on Human Rights

'Basic Documents on Human Rights' provides a collection of key documents and covers all elements of the subject. It is an account of the most important instruments adopted by the UN, its agencies, regional organizations and other actors.

Human Rights in Global Health

Rights-Based Governance for a Globalizing World

Human Rights in Global Health

Institutions matter for the advancement of human rights in global health. Given the dramatic development of human rights under international law and the parallel proliferation of global institutions for public health, there arises an imperative to understand the implementation of human rights through global health governance. This volume examines the evolving relationship between human rights, global governance, and public health, studying an expansive set of health challenges through a multi-sectoral array of global organizations. To analyze the structural determinants of rights-based governance, the organizations in this volume include those international bureaucracies that implement human rights in ways that influence public health in a globalizing world. This volume brings together leading health and human rights scholars and practitioners from academia, non-governmental organizations, and the United Nations system. They explore the foundations of human rights as a normative framework for global health governance, the mandate of the World Health Organization to pursue a human rights-based approach to health, the role of inter-governmental organizations across a range of health-related human rights, the influence of rights-based economic governance on public health, and the focus on global health among institutions of human rights governance. Contributing chapters each map the distinct human rights efforts within a specific institution of global governance for health. Through the comparative institutional analysis in this volume, the contributing authors examine institutional dynamics to operationalize human rights in organizational policies, programs, and practices and assess institutional factors that facilitate or inhibit human rights mainstreaming for global health advancement.

The United Nations and Decolonization: The Role of Afro — Asia

The United Nations and Decolonization: The Role of Afro — Asia

When the United Nations' Charter was signed in San Francisco in 1945, the number of African member states of the Organisation was only 4. By the end of 1960 it had risen to 22. Today it is 41. How has this come about? The answer is given in this valuable book by Dr. Yassin EI-Ayouty. The handful of Asian and African countries who had the privilege of foundation membership made it their business to see to it that their brethren who were still under the colonial yoke attained their freedom and independence as soon as possible and, in the meanwhile, that they were treated with decency and fairness by their colonial masters. It was a tough assignment. The struggle was long, requiring a great deal of patience and endurance. It was at times fierce, requiring much dogged resolution. It also called for the deployment of intellectual agility ofthe highest order. Fortunately all these qualities were available in the rep resentatives of Asia and Africa who led the great struggle. These dis tinguished delegates also demonstrated a wonderful degree of solidarity which has, happily, become an Afro-Asian tradition at the United Nations. The battle began even before the Organisation had itself become a fact. It would have been a more difficult struggle, had there been no provision in the Charter at all in respect of colonies, by whatever name called.

Draft Heritage Protection Bill

Eleventh Report of Session 2007-08; Report, Together with Formal Minutes, Oral and Written Evidence

Draft Heritage Protection Bill

In April 2008, the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) published a Draft Heritage Bill and the Government has indicated that the Bill will be in next year's legislative programme. The Bill is designed to unify heritage protection regimes, allow greater public involvement in decisions, and place heritage at the heart of the planning system. The Committee has undertaken pre-legislative scrutiny of the bill but this was undermined by the incomplete nature of the legislation. The Committee also felt that the Government must prioritise the revision of Planning policy guidelines (PPGs) 15 & 16 to ensure that the new guidance on planning policy can be implemented at the same time as the Bill. Further serious issues of concern included the accuracy of current cost estimates & impact assessment and sufficient staffing with the necessary skills, in particular conservation officers. The Committee was also not convinced that Heritage Partnership Agreements (HPAs), a new system of management agreements for owners of large estates, were a robust business option. Nor could any evidence be found that either DCMS or English Heritage had considered any amendments to the legislation which would improve the operation or effectiveness of the enforcement powers for local authorities.