An Accidental Soldier

Memoirs of a Mestizo in Vietnam

An Accidental Soldier

"I was born in a log cabin just like Abe Lincoln, except our cabin was a rental." Starting with this account of his humble origins, Manny Garcia, who describes himself as "a left-handed, rather contrary Mestizo-American," has written a memoir that begins in late 1947 in the San Luis Valley of Southern Colorado and takes him to Utah and a stint as a Mormon and ultimately to Vietnam. In late 1965, a cocky, naive, alienated teen-ager, Garcia joined the army almost accidentally, enlisting for three years. At eighteen he became an Airborne Ranger, a combat infantryman with the crack First Brigade of the 101st Airborne Division, the Screaming Eagles. His book shows you the war from the point man position, up close and personal, at eye level. "I returned to the body and checked for booby traps. I noticed the guerilla's small bare leathery feet. I rolled the body over and realized the corpse at my feet was an old woman. Her hair was pulled back and tied in a bun, like how my grandmother used to wear her own hair. This was my first kill. I killed a woman before I made love to one. I killed a woman before I was old enough to vote. I killed a woman before I bought my first car. I killed a woman and I was an Eagle Scout. I killed a woman while I was on probation to the Juvenile Court. I killed a woman before I knew she was a woman. I killed a woman while working for the United States Army in South Vietnam. I had killed before I had lived. The afternoon in the jungle was bright and hot. I stood there sweating, bewildered, dumfounded, and completely absorbed by the power."--from An Accidental Soldier "A valuable contribution to the growing list of Viet Nam narratives told from communities whose histories have yet to be fully recognized."--Jorge Mariscal, University of California, San Diego

The Gift of Fire and On the Head of a Pin

Two Short Novels from Crosstown to Oblivion

The Gift of Fire and On the Head of a Pin

New York Times bestselling author Walter Mosley delivers two speculative tales, in one volume, of everyday people exposed to life-altering truths. The Gift of Fire In ancient mythology, the Titan Prometheus was punished by the gods for bringing man the gift of fire—an event that set humankind on its course of knowledge. As punishment for making man as powerful as gods, Prometheus was bound to a rock; every day his immortal body was devoured by a giant eagle. But in The Gift of Fire, those chains cease to be, and the great champion of man walks from that immortal prison into present-day South Central Los Angeles. On the Head of a Pin Joshua Winterland and Ana Fried are working at Jennings-Tremont Enterprises when they make the most important discovery in the history of this world—or possibly the next. JTE is developing advanced animatronics editing techniques to create high-end movies indistinguishable from live-action. Long dead stars can now share the screen with today's A-list. But one night Joshua and Ana discover something lingering in the rendered footage...an entity that will lead them into a new age beyond the reality they have come to know. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Biology Today and Tomorrow without Physiology

Biology Today and Tomorrow without Physiology

Engage your students and strike the perfect balance between level of detail and accessibility! Written for a one-semester, non-Biology majors course, BIOLOGY TODAY AND TOMORROW is packed with applications that are relevant to a student's daily life. The clear, straightforward writing style, in-text learning support, and trendsetting art help students understand key concepts. The accompanying Aplia for Biology further improves comprehension and outcomes by increasing student effort engagement and retention. Overall, this accessible and engaging introduction to biology provides an understanding of biology and the process of science while developing the critical-thinking skills students need to become responsible citizens of the world. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Little Benjamin and the Red Fire Ants

Little Benjamin and the Red Fire Ants

Little Benjamin enjoys playing outside Grandma's house, because there are many new and exciting creatures to see and discover. One day, he goes on an adventure to see up close the red fire ants that live behind Grandma's house. In the end, his fears are conquered and he begins to explore the little critters that live around him. These explorations help him to appreciate and understand the world in which he lives.

Bitten

True Medical Stories of Bites and Stings

Bitten

We've all been bitten. And we all have stories. The bite attacks featured in this dramatic book take place in big cities, small towns, and remote villages around the world and throughout history. Some are as familiar and contemporary as encounters with mosquitoes in New York City and snakes in southern California's Hollywood Hills or as exotic and foreign as the tsetse in equatorial Africa, the camel in Riyadh, and the Komodo dragon in Indonesia. While others, such as people biting other people---well, these are in a category of their own. Among the startling stories and fascinating facts in Bitten. o A six-year-old girl descends into weeks of extreme lassitude until a surgeon plucks an engorged tick from her scalp. o A diabetic living in the West Indies awakes one morning to a rat eating his left great and second toes. o A twenty-eight-year-old man loses a third of his nose to a bite by his wife. o In San Francisco, after a penile bite, a man develops "flesh-eating strep," which spreads to his lower abdomen. o Severe bites by rabid animals to the face and digits, because of their rich nerve supply, are the most likely to lead to rabies and have the shortest incubation periods. o Following the bite of a seal or contact with its tissues, sealers develop such agonizing pain and swelling in their bites that, far from medical care, they sometimes amputate their own fingers. o Perhaps the most devastating human bite wound injuries are those involving the nose; doctors in Boroko near Papua, New Guinea, reported a series of ninety-five human bites treated in the Division of Surgery from 1986 to 1992---twelve were to the nose, nine in women, and three in men, and in most of the cases, the biter was an angry spouse. With reports from medical journals, case histories, colleagues, and from her own twenty-eight-year career as a practicing physician and infectious diseases specialist, Pamela Nagami's Bitten offers readers intrigued by human infection and disease and mesmerized by creatures in p0the wild a compulsively readable narrative that is entertaining, sometimes disgusting, and always enjoyable.