Jews and Jewishness in British Children’s Literature

Jews and Jewishness in British Children’s Literature

In a period of ongoing debate about faith, identity, migration and culture, this timely study explores the often politicised nature of constructions of one of Britain’s longest standing minority communities. Representations in children’s literature influenced by the impact of the Enlightenment, the Empire, the Holocaust and 9/11 reveal an ongoing concern with establishing, maintaining or problematising the boundaries between Jews and Gentiles. Chapters on gender, refugees, multiculturalism and historical fiction argue that literature for young people demonstrates that the position of Jews in Britain has been ambivalent, and that this ambivalence has persisted to a surprising degree in view of the dramatic socio-cultural changes that have taken place over two centuries. Wide-ranging in scope and interdisciplinary in approach, Jews and Jewishness in British Children’s Literature discusses over one hundred texts ranging from picture books to young adult fiction and realism to fantasy. Madelyn Travis examines rare eighteenth- and nineteenth-century material plus works by authors including Maria Edgeworth, E. Nesbit, Rudyard Kipling, Richmal Crompton, Lynne Reid Banks, Michael Rosen and others. The study also draws on Travis’s previously unpublished interviews with authors including Adele Geras, Eva Ibbotson, Ann Jungman and Judith Kerr.

The Conquest Of Granada

eBook Edition

The Conquest Of Granada

In 1830 Irving published his " Chronicles of the Conquest of Granada," one of the most delightful of his works, an exact history, for such it is admitted to be by thosewho have searched most carefully the ancient records of Spain, yet so full of personal incident, so diversified with surprising turns of fortune, and these wrought up with such picturesque effect, that, to use an expression of Pope, a young lady might read it by mistake for a romance.

Chronicle of the Conquest of Granada

Chronicle of the Conquest of Granada

Reproduction of the original: Chronicle of the Conquest of Granada by Washington Irving

TALES OF THE ALHAMBRA & CHRONICLE OF THE CONQUEST OF GRANADA

From the Prolific American Writer, Biographer and Historian, Author of Life of George Washington, History of New York, Legend of Sleepy Hollow & Rip Van Winkle

TALES OF THE ALHAMBRA & CHRONICLE OF THE CONQUEST OF GRANADA

"Tales of the Alhambra" is a collection of essays, verbal sketches and stories about the Moors and Spaniards. Through these stories, sketches and essays it is described the author's journey through Spain in Andalusia, where he gives a general description of the country and people. The collection consists of around 30 Tales about the Alhambra, the city castle of the last Moorish rulers in Al-Andalus. The stories are dealing, for the most part, with after-Moorish period in which the Alhambra has been managed as a possession of the Spanish kings and was left to decay. "Tales of the Alhambra” is translated into many languages and is considered one of the most important works of the author. During Irving's stay in Spain, after the success of his previous books, he was invited to stay at the palace of the Duke of Gor, who gave him unfettered access to his library containing many medieval manuscripts. It took him just a year to complete The Chronicles of the Conquest of Granada. The book is covering the long process of banishing the Moors from Spain and Portugal. Washington Irving (1783-1859) was an American author, essayist, biographer, historian, and diplomat of the early 19th century. Irving also served as the U.S. ambassador to Spain from 1842 to 1846.