Regimes of Desire

Explores the limitations of sexual expression in Tokyo's "safe" nightlife district and in Japanese media

Regimes of Desire

Explores the limitations of sexual expression in Tokyo's "safe" nightlife district and in Japanese media

Genealogies of Emotions Intimacies and Desire

This book will appeal to students and scholars in the social sciences and humanities, including sociology, gender studies, cultural studies, and literary studies.

Genealogies of Emotions  Intimacies  and Desire

Genealogies of Emotions, Intimacies and Desire excavates epistemologies which attempt to explain changes in emotional regimes from medieval society to late modernity. Key in this debate is the concept of intimacy. The book shows that different historical periods are characterized by emotional regimes where intimacy in the form of desire, sex, passion, and sex largely exist outside marriage, and that marriage and traditional normative values and structures are fundamentally incompatible with the expression of intimacy in the history of emotional regimes. The book draws on the work of a number of theorists who assess change in emotional regimes by drawing on intimacy including Michel Foucault, Eva Illouz, Lauren Berlant, Anthony Giddens, Laura Ann Stoler, Anne McClintock, Niklas Luhmann and David Shumway. Some of the areas covered by the book include: Foucault, sex and sexuality; romantic and courtly love; intimacy in late modernity; Imperial power, gender and intimacy, intimacy and feminist interventions; and the commercialization of intimacy. This book will appeal to students and scholars in the social sciences and humanities, including sociology, gender studies, cultural studies, and literary studies.

The Politics of Our Selves

Because regulatory regimes rely upon not only the compliance of the individuals whom they regulate but also their desire to comply, that desire itself becomes the site of possible resistance to and subversion of such regimes.

The Politics of Our Selves

Some theorists understand the self as constituted by power relations, while others insist upon the self's autonomous capacities for critical reflection and deliberate self-transformation. All too often, these understandings of the self are assumed to be incompatible. Amy Allen, however, argues that the capacity for autonomy is rooted in the very power relations that constitute the self. Her theoretical framework illuminates both aspects of what she calls, following Foucault, the "politics of our selves." It analyzes power in all its depth and complexity, including the complicated phenomenon of subjection, without giving up on the ideal of autonomy. Drawing on original and critical readings of a diverse group of theorists, Allen shows how the self can be both constituted by power and capable of an autonomous self-constitution.

Regime Consolidation and Transitional Justice

They discovered that in these countries regime change was significantly driven by external pressures by old elites but not necessarily revolution by new elites, such as the desire to become a respected member of international ...

Regime Consolidation and Transitional Justice

Regime Consolidation and Transitional Justice explores the effect of transitional justice measures on 'regime consolidation', or the means by which a new political system is established in a post-transition context. Focusing on the long-term impact of transitional justice mechanisms in three countries over several decades, the gradual process by which these political systems have been legitimatised is revealed. Through case studies of East and West Germany after World War II, Spain after the end of the Franco dictatorship in 1975 and Turkey's long journey to achieving democratic reform, Regime Consolidation and Transitional Justice shows how transitional justice and regime consolidation are intertwined. The interdisciplinary study, which will be of interest to scholars of criminal law, human rights law, political science, democracy, autocracies and transformation theories, demonstrates, importantly, that the political systems in question are not always 'more' democratic than their predecessors and do not always enhance democracy post-regime consolidation.

Morality

Unless having the desire is itself pleasurable, or relieves one of pain, if it is irrational to do something, ... Satisfying a desire to undergo an unpleasant training regime does not even sound like a reason for undergoing an ...

Morality

In this final revision of the classic work, the author has produced the fullest and most sophisticated account of this influential theoretical model. Here, he makes clear that morality is an informal system that does not provide unique answers to every moral question but does always limit the range of morally acceptable options, and so explains why some moral disagreements cannot be resolved. The importance placed on the moral ideals also makes clear that the moral rules are only one part of the moral system. A chapter that is devoted to justifying violations of the rules illustrates how the moral rules are embedded in the system and cannot be adequately understood independently of it. The chapter on reasons includes a new account of what makes one reason better than another and elucidates the complex hybrid nature of rationality.

Voices from the Gulag

This is why Communist regimes were periodically forced to resort to NEPtype economic policies , which repudiated the very principles of Communism . 1 But the regimes were also periodically forced to punish the desire for greater wealth ...

Voices from the Gulag


Democracies and Authoritarian Regimes

... its desire to advance a number of core national security interests, but key among them was the Kremlin's desire to push back against the United States and what Russia perceives as Washington's efforts to unseat unfriendly regimes.

Democracies and Authoritarian Regimes

Democracies and Authoritarian Regimes provides a broad, accessible overview of the key institutions and political dynamics in democracies and dictatorships, enabling students to assess the benefits and risks associated with democracy, and the growing challenges to it. Comprehensive coverage of the full spectrum of political systems enhances students' understanding of the relevance of contemporary global trends, including the nature of democratic backsliding and authoritarian resurgence, the rise of populism and identity politics, and the impact of cultural and socio-economic drivers of democracy. Each chapter features a broad range of case studies complemented by boxes that illustrate key terms, ensuring relevant research is translated in a clear, engaging format for students. This text is supported by a range of online resources, to encourage deeper engagement with the subject matter. For students: Regular updates to supplement the text, ensuring students are fully informed of real-time developments in the field For lecturers: In-class assignments to reinforce key concepts and facilitate deeper, critical engagement with key topics

Animals and Desire in South African Fiction

This book considers the political potential of affective experiences of desire as reflected in contemporary South African literature.

Animals and Desire in South African Fiction

This book considers the political potential of affective experiences of desire as reflected in contemporary South African literature. Jason Price argues that definitions of desire deployed by capitalist and colonial culture maintain social inequality by managing relations to ensure a steady flow of capital and pleasure for the dominant classes, whereas affective encounters with animals reveal the nonhuman nature of desire, a biopower that, in its unpredictability, can frustrate regimes of management and control. Price wonders how animals’ different desires might enable new modes of thought to positively transform and resist the status quo. This book contends that South African literary works employ nonhuman desire and certain indigenous notions of desire to imagine a South Africa that can be markedly different from the past.

Ultimate Freedom No Choice

... by means of celebratory days (Jaunības diena (youth Day)) and mass sports events, confirmed the regime's desire to ... hierarchy of authoritarian and totalitarian regimes: the concept entartete Kunst (“Degenerate art”—transl. from ...

Ultimate Freedom     No Choice

Reflecting on the origins and ideological formulas of the European authoritarian regimes in the interwar period, this book provides a deep and fascinating insight into the regional particularities of the authoritarian regime of Karlis Ulmanis in 1930s Latvia.

Capitalism and Desire

Capitalism dominates, Todd McGowan argues, because it mimics the structure of our desire while hiding the trauma that the system inflicts upon it.

Capitalism and Desire

Despite creating vast inequalities and propping up reactionary world regimes, capitalism has many passionate defenders—but not because of what it withholds from some and gives to others. Capitalism dominates, Todd McGowan argues, because it mimics the structure of our desire while hiding the trauma that the system inflicts upon it. People from all backgrounds enjoy what capitalism provides, but at the same time are told more and better is yet to come. Capitalism traps us through an incomplete satisfaction that compels us after the new, the better, and the more. Capitalism's parasitic relationship to our desires gives it the illusion of corresponding to our natural impulses, which is how capitalism's defenders characterize it. By understanding this psychic strategy, McGowan hopes to divest us of our addiction to capitalist enrichment and help us rediscover enjoyment as we actually experienced it. By locating it in the present, McGowan frees us from our attachment to a better future and the belief that capitalism is an essential outgrowth of human nature. From this perspective, our economic, social, and political worlds open up to real political change. Eloquent and enlivened by examples from film, television, consumer culture, and everyday life, Capitalism and Desire brings a new, psychoanalytically grounded approach to political and social theory.

Exchange Rates Capital Flows and Monetary Policy in a Changing World Economy

This literature views policy regimes as endogenous responses to institutional and political features of the economy. ... related to the exchange rate regime, to the desire to tax capital income, and to the desire to tax money balances.

Exchange Rates  Capital Flows  and Monetary Policy in a Changing World Economy

The dramatic growth of international capital flow has provided unprecedented opportunities and risks in emerging markets. This book is the result of a conference exploring this phenomenon, sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. The issues explored include direct versus portfolio investment; exchange rates and economic growth; and optimal exchange rate policy for stabilizing inflation in developing countries. It concludes with a panel discussion on central bank coordination in the midst of exchange rate instability.

Renegade Regimes

In this timely new work, Miroslav Nincic illuminates the complex issues and policy choices surrounding clashes between international society and states that challenge the majority's espoused interests and values.

Renegade Regimes

Rogue states pursue weapons of mass destruction, support terrorism, violate human rights, engage in acts of territorial aggression, and pose a threat to the international community. Recent debates and policy shifts regarding Iraq, North Korea, Syria, Iran, and Afghanistan reflect the uneven attempts to contend with regimes that pursue deviant behavior. In this timely new work, Miroslav Nincic illuminates the complex issues and policy choices surrounding clashes between international society and states that challenge the majority's espoused interests and values. As conventional approaches to international relations lose their relevance in a changing world, Nincic's work provides new and necessary frameworks and perspectives. Nincic explores recent events and develops theoretical models of contemporary asymmetrical power relations among states to offer a systematic account of the genesis, trajectory, and motivations of renegade regimes. He discusses how the pursuit of policies that defy international norms is often motivated by a regime's desire for greater domestic control. From this starting point, Nincic considers states' deviant behavior through two stages: the first is the initial decision to defy key aspects of the international normative order, and the second is the manner in which subsequent behavior is shaped by the international community's responses. In addressing attempts to control pariah states, Nincic assesses the effectiveness of sanctions and military responses. He provocatively argues that comprehensive economic sanctions can lead to a restructuring of the renegade regime's ideology and economy that ultimately strengthens its grip on power. In his chapter on military intervention, Nincic argues that force or the threat of force against a rogue state frequently triggers a protective reflex among its citizens, inspiring them to rally around the government's goals and values. Military threats, Nincic concludes, produce several kinds of consequences and their impact needs to be better understood.

Deleuze and Guattari

This accessible book examines critically the writings of Deleuze and Guattari, clarifying the ideas of these two notoriously difficult thinkers without over-simplifying them.

Deleuze and Guattari

This accessible book examines critically the writings of Deleuze and Guattari, clarifying the ideas of these two notoriously difficult thinkers without over-simplifying them. Divided into three sections - Knowledge, Power, and Liberation of Desire - the book provides a systematic account of the intellectual context as well as an exhaustive analysis of the key themes informing Deleuze and Guattari's work. It provides the framework for reading the important and influential study Capitalism and Schizophrenia and, with the needs of students in mind, explains the key concepts in Deleuze and Guattari's discussion of philosophy, art and politics. Definitive and incisive, the book will be invaluable in situating the philosop

Explaining Social Behavior

Might democratic regimes somehow restrain the desires of the citizens to do what democracy allows them to do? This was Tocqueville's claim. He thought that to satisfy a need for authority for which politics did not provide, ...

Explaining Social Behavior

In this new edition of his critically acclaimed book, Jon Elster examines the nature of social behavior, proposing choice as the central concept of the social sciences. Extensively revised throughout, the book offers an overview of key explanatory mechanisms, drawing on many case studies and experiments to explore the nature of explanation in the social sciences; an analysis of the mental states - beliefs, desires, and emotions - that are precursors to action; a systematic comparison of rational-choice models of behavior with alternative accounts, and a review of mechanisms of social interaction ranging from strategic behavior to collective decision making. A wholly new chapter includes an exploration of classical moralists and Proust in charting mental mechanisms operating 'behind the back' of the agent, and a new conclusion points to the pitfalls and fallacies in current ways of doing social science, proposing guidelines for more modest and more robust procedures.

Regime Change in the Yugoslav Successor States

Legitimizing Principles Barker (1990) writes, “The desire to justify one's domination is as great as the desire to dominate” (Barker 1990, quoted in Maleševic 2002: 84). Since the ways in which regimes justify their rule ...

Regime Change in the Yugoslav Successor States

Scholars, practitioners, and policymakers will find the book to be a compelling contribution to the study of comparative politics, democratization, and European integration.

Elites Crises and the Origins of Regimes

The empire brought a multitude of kingdoms and principalities under one German state , and it realized the long - standing desire for German unity . Only a few dissident elite groups felt that the monarchical regime did not correspond ...

Elites  Crises  and the Origins of Regimes

Most political regimes, whether authoritarian or democratic, are born in abrupt, brutal, and momentous crises. In this volume, a group of prominent scholars explores how these seminal events affect elites and shape regimes. Combining theoretical and case study chapters, the authors draw from a wide range of historical and contemporary examples to challenge mainstream developmental explanations of political change, which emphasize incremental changes and evolutions stretching over generations. Instead, the authors argue here, political leaders and elites possess significant autonomy and latitude for maneuver, especially in times of crisis. Elites' choices are frequently decisive in the making of regimes and the forging of national political histories. Providing a sustained comparative analysis of elites, their circulation, and behavior across times and countries, this lucid volume will be invaluable for scholars and students alike.

The 1956 Hungarian Revolution

There have been some indications recently that the Albanian regime may desire to establish diplomatic relations with the United States. Bulgaria 16. The Bulgarian regime, despite occasional top-level purges and discontent among ...

The 1956 Hungarian Revolution

If there had been all-news television channels in 1956, viewers around the world would have been glued to their sets between October 23 and November 4. This book tells the story of the Hungarian Revolution in 120 original documents, ranging from the minutes of the first meeting of Khrushchev with Hungarian bosses after Stalin's death in 1953 to Yeltsin's declaration made in 1992. Other documents include letters from Yuri Andropov, Soviet Ambassador in Budapest during and after the revolt. The great majority of the material appears in English for the first time, and almost all come from archives that were inaccessible until the 1990s.

Dynamics of Sanctions in World Affairs

Recent sanctions on Ethiopia and Eriteria , Sierra Leone , Liberia and the Taliban regime of Afghanistan have all been targeted . ... Third , those who desire to give wider meaning to sanctions resort to extraneous interpretations of ...

Dynamics of Sanctions in World Affairs

The Existing Literature On Sanctions Consists Of Either Case Studies Which Deal With The Particular Issues Associated With The Selected States Or Articles Of The Journals Which Plead, Predominantly, The Case Of Sanction-Imposing States Or Newspaper Write-Ups And Editorial Comments Which Analyse The Current Situation. There Is No Book On Sanctions As Such. An Attempt Has Been Made In This Book To Cover Up All The Selective Aspects Of The Existing Literature On Sanctions. It Discusses Concepts, Issues, Dilemmas, Paradox, Theories, Perspectives Of Sender And Target States As Allies And As Adversaries, The Goals, The Objectives, The Quantum Of Success And Failure Or Effectiveness And Ineffectiveness. These Crucial Issue-Areas Of Sanctions Run In Fact, Like Common Thread, Through All The Following Chapters:(1) The Humanitarian Intervention: Sanction Fixation(2) Sanction Paradox(3) Theories Of Sanctions(4) South Korea And North Korea(5) Iran And Iraq(6) India And Pakistan(7) Un Sanction(8) ConclusionThus, The Book Takes The Comprehensive View Of Sanctions. And In This Respect, Out Of The Existing Literature Of Exclusive Nature, It Endeavours To Develop The Inclusive Dimension. As Such It Is Hoped That The Readers Shall Have All Aspects Of Sanctions In A Single Volume, Not Easily Available Elsewhere.

Infinite Autonomy

natural desires, and we find that holding ourselves to conventions will more effectively satisfy natural desires. The index of good and bad regimes, then, boils down to how well these regimes fulfill naturally given desires.

Infinite Autonomy

G. W. F. Hegel and Friedrich Nietzsche are often considered the philosophical antipodes of the nineteenth century. In Infinite Autonomy, Jeffrey Church draws on the thinking of both Hegel and Nietzsche to assess the modern Western defense of individuality&—to consider whether we were right to reject the ancient model of community above the individual. The theoretical and practical implications of this project are important, because the proper defense of the individual allows for the survival of modern liberal institutions in the face of non-Western critics who value communal goals at the expense of individual rights. By drawing from Hegelian and Nietzschean ideas of autonomy, Church finds a third way for the individual&—what he calls the &“historical individual,&” which goes beyond the disagreements of the ancients and the moderns while nonetheless incorporating their distinctive contributions.

Impossible Desires

... however, and in relation to sexuality and desire, that the most powerful and indispensable critiques of dominant formulations of nation and diaspora are taking place. My contention here is that the various regimes of colonialism, ...

Impossible Desires

By bringing queer theory to bear on ideas of diaspora, Gayatri Gopinath produces both a more compelling queer theory and a more nuanced understanding of diaspora. Focusing on queer female diasporic subjectivity, Gopinath develops a theory of diaspora apart from the logic of blood, authenticity, and patrilineal descent that she argues invariably forms the core of conventional formulations. She examines South Asian diasporic literature, film, and music in order to suggest alternative ways of conceptualizing community and collectivity across disparate geographic locations. Her agile readings challenge nationalist ideologies by bringing to light that which has been rendered illegible or impossible within diaspora: the impure, inauthentic, and nonreproductive. Gopinath juxtaposes diverse texts to indicate the range of oppositional practices, subjectivities, and visions of collectivity that fall outside not only mainstream narratives of diaspora, colonialism, and nationalism but also most projects of liberal feminism and gay and lesbian politics and theory. She considers British Asian music of the 1990s alongside alternative media and cultural practices. Among the fictional works she discusses are V. S. Naipaul’s classic novel A House for Mr. Biswas, Ismat Chughtai’s short story “The Quilt,” Monica Ali’s Brick Lane, Shyam Selvadurai’s Funny Boy, and Shani Mootoo’s Cereus Blooms at Night. Analyzing films including Deepa Mehta’s controversial Fire and Mira Nair’s Monsoon Wedding, she pays particular attention to how South Asian diasporic feminist filmmakers have reworked Bollywood’s strategies of queer representation and to what is lost or gained in this process of translation. Gopinath’s readings are dazzling, and her theoretical framework transformative and far-reaching.