Nos 1458 1747

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Nos  1458 1747


Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln Facs 5 6

A transcript of the original cartulary of Lincoln cathedral, compiled during the 13th and 14th centuries, with additional charters, a comprehensive introdution and two volumes of facsimiles.

Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln  Facs 5 6

A transcript of the original cartulary of Lincoln cathedral, compiled during the 13th and 14th centuries, with additional charters, a comprehensive introdution and two volumes of facsimiles.

Bishop Robert Grosseteste and Lincoln Cathedral

Ibid., also C.W. Foster and K. Major (eds), The Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln (Lincoln, 1935), iii, ... 5. Nikolaus Pevsner and John Harris, The Buildings of England: Lincolnshire (New Haven, 2002), p. 460.

Bishop Robert Grosseteste and Lincoln Cathedral

Bishop Robert Grosseteste and Lincoln Cathedral is an in-depth investigation of Grosseteste?s relationship to the medieval cathedral at Lincoln and the surrounding city. This book will contribute to the understanding of Gothic architecture in early thirteenth century England - most specifically, how forms and spaces were conceived in relation to the cultural, religious and political life of the period. The architecture and topography of Lincoln Cathedral are examined in their cultural contexts, in relation to scholastic philosophy, science and cosmology, and medieval ideas about light and geometry, as highlighted in the writings of Robert Grosseteste - Bishop of Lincoln Cathedral (1235-53). At the same time the architecture of the cathedral is considered in relation to the roles of the clergy and masons; the policies of the bishop; matters of governance, worship and education; ecclesiastical hierarchy, church liturgy, politics and processionals. The book explores Grosseteste?s ideas in the broader context of medieval and Renaissance cosmologies, optics/perspective, natural philosophy and experimental science, and considers historical precedents in regard to religious, political and symbolic influences on church building. The contributors to this volume make an important contribution to our current understanding of the relation between architecture, theology, politics and society during the Middle Ages, and how religious spaces were conceived and experienced.

English Government in the Thirteenth Century

1961 , reprinted 1992 ) , 30 ; The Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln , ed . C.W. Foster ( vols 1-4 ) and K. Major ( vols 5-10 ) ( Lincoln Record Soc . , 10 vols , 1931-73 ) , vii . 209–22 , esp . 217–19 .

English Government in the Thirteenth Century

No description available.

Noblewomen aristocracy and power in the twelfth century Anglo Norman realm

55 The Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln: Volume I, ed. C. W. Foster (Lincoln Record Society, 27, 1931), pp. 293–5. This is a fascinating insight into the material culture of a woman at the turn of the twelfth ...

Noblewomen  aristocracy and power in the twelfth century Anglo Norman realm

This electronic version has been made available under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) open access license. The first major work on noblewomen in the twelfth century and Normandy, and of the ways in which they exercised power. Offers an important reconceptualisation of women’s role in aristocratic society and suggests new ways of looking at lordship and the ruling elite in the high middle ages. Considers a wide range of literary sources such as chronicles, charters, seals and governmental records to draw out a detailed picture of noblewomen in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm. Asserts the importance of the life-cycle in determining the power of aristocratic women. Demonstrates that the influence of gender on lordship was profound, complex and varied.

The Archaeology of the Lower City and Adjacent Suburbs

Steep Hill Excavated Glass (SH74) Catalogue, Unpublished report for City Lincoln Archaeol Unit. LAO = Lincolnshire Archives Office. ... Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln VIII, Lincoln Record Soc, 51, Lincoln.

The Archaeology of the Lower City and Adjacent Suburbs

This volume contains reports on excavations undertaken in the lower walled city at Lincoln, which lies on sloping ground on the northern scarp of the Witham gap, and its adjacent suburbs between 1972 and 1987, and forms a companion volume to LAS volumes 2 and 3 which cover other parts of the historic city. The earliest features encountered were discovered both near to the line of Ermine Street and towards Broadgate. Remains of timber storage buildings were found, probably associated with the Roman legionary occupation in the later 1st century AD. The earliest occupation of the hillside after the foundation of the colonia towards the end of the century consisted mainly of commercial premises, modest residences, and storage buildings. It seems likely that the boundary of the lower enclosure was designated before it was fortified in the later 2nd century with the street pattern belonging to the earlier part of the century. Larger aristocratic residences came to dominate the hillside with public facilities fronting on to the line of the zigzagging main route. In the 4th century, the fortifications were enlarged and two new gates inserted. Examples of so-called ‘Dark Earth’ deposits were here dated to the very latest phases of Roman occupation. Elements of some Roman structures survived to be reused in subsequent centuries. There are hints of one focus in the Middle Saxon period, in the area of St. Peter’s church, but occupation of an urban nature did not recommence until the late 9th century with the first phases of Anglo-Scandinavian occupation recorded here. Sequences of increasingly intensive occupation from the 10th century were identified, with plentiful evidence for industrial activity, including pottery, metalworking and other, crafts, as well as parish churches. Markets were established in the 11th century and stone began to replace timber for residential structures from the mid-12th century with clear evidence of the quality of some of the houses. With the decline in the city’s fortunes from the late 13th century, the fringe sites became depopulated and there was much rebuilding elsewhere, including some fine new houses. There was a further revival in the later post-medieval period, but much of the earlier fabric, and surviving stretches of Roman city wall, were swept away in the 19th century.

English Episcopal Acta 28 Canterbury 1070 1136

J. Depoin 5 vols ( Archives de la France monastique xiii , xvi , documents de Saint- xviii , xx , xxi , 1912–21 ) Martin - des - Champs Reedy , W.T. ' The first two ... The Registrum antiquissimum of the cathedral church of Lincoln ed .

English Episcopal Acta 28 Canterbury 1070 1136

This volume presents almost 100 Acta which as a whole comprise the largest assemblage of Acta to survive in England from before 1136. The Acta date from the appointment of Lanfranc, the first archbishop appointed by William the Conqueror, until shortly after the death of Henry I, when William of Corbeil was archbishop.

The Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln

Lincoln Cathedral Charles Wilmer Foster, Kathleen Major. 10 Buged ' libertatem in prebendis ... 3 in placitum A65 Ix . subdecanatui A65 ; subdiaconatui Ix BIBk ; altered from subdiaconatui A905 . 5 Lectonie ... 287 REGISTRUM ANTIQUISSIMUM.

The Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln


Finance and the Crusades

Canterbury and York Society (5), 1908. Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln, edited by Charles W. Foster and Kathleen Major, 12 vols. Lincoln Record Society (27–29, 32, 34, 41–42, 46, 51, 62, 67–68), 1931–1973.

Finance and the Crusades

This book investigates the financial aspects of crusading in the thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries. Taking the kingdom of England as a case study, it explores a variety of themes, such as how much crusades cost, how they were financed, how funds were transferred to the East and how crusaders fared financially after their return. Its fundamental argument, in contrast with current historiography, is that it was the "private" fundraising of individuals – not the "public" fundraising of the Crown and the Church – that constituted the life-blood of the crusade movement in the period under consideration. Indeed, it is likely that the crusades were only able to remain central to the religious and political life of England, and indeed western Christendom, because participants, and those in their connection, continued to be willing to sacrifice their own financial wellbeing for the interests of the Holy Land.

The Making of the Neville Family in England 1166 1400

... C. W. Foster and Kathleen Major , The Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln , Lincoln Record Society , 5 ( Hereford , 1931-73 ) , p . 36 . 48 Cl . R. 1231-34 , p . 512. This marriage was discussed by Frederick ...

The Making of the Neville Family in England  1166 1400

A study of power in the middle ages: the Nevilles of Raby, who included among their members Warwick the Kingmaker, was one of the major baronial families in England.

Historia Selebiensis Monasterii

J. Raine (Surtees Society, i; 183 5). Registrum antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln, ed. C. W. Foster and K. Major (10 vols. and 2 vols. of facsimiles; Lincoln Record Society, xxvii—ix, xxxii, xxxiv, xli, xlii, xlvi, 1i, ...

Historia Selebiensis Monasterii

The Selby history survives as part of the composite medieval manuscript BnF MS latin n10940.

The Medieval English Landscape 1000 1540

... 31–2; Taylor (1983), 184–5. Earldom of Gloucester Charters (1973), 65–6; Hoskins and Finberg (1952), 78–82; Beresford and St Joseph (1979), 95–6; Linehan (1966), 119, 133–4; Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln ...

The Medieval English Landscape  1000 1540

The landscape of medieval England was the product of a multitude of hands. While the power to shape the landscape inevitably lay with the Crown, the nobility and the religious houses, this study also highlights the contribution of the peasantry in the layout of rural settlements and ridge-and-furrow field works, and the funding of parish churches by ordinary townsfolk. The importance of population trends is emphasised as a major factor in shaping the medieval landscape: the rising curve of the eleventh to thirteenth centuries imposing growing pressures on resources, and the devastating impact of the Black Death leading to radical decline in the fourteenth century. Opening with a broad-ranging analysis of political and economic trends in medieval England, the book progresses thematically to assess the impact of farming, rural settlement, towns, the Church, and fortification using many original case studies. The concluding chapter charts the end of the medieval landscape with the dissolution of the monasteries, the replacement of castles by country houses, the ongoing enclosure of fields, and the growth of towns.

Vicars Choral at English Cathedrals

1914 , Lincoln Wills Volume 1. AD 1271 to 1526 , Lincoln Record Society 5. Lincoln . Foster , C W ( ed . ) , 1931 , The Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln Volume I , Lincoln Record Society 27. Hereford .

Vicars Choral at English Cathedrals

Staffing medieval cathedrals was always a problem. Some English cathedrals introduced monks, but those at Chichester, Exeter, Hereford, Lichfield, Lincoln, St. Paul's London, Salisbury, Wells and York were all in the hands of secular canons. These senior priests were rarely present, however, so such cathedrals were actually staffed by vicars, who took the canons' places in services. This book is concerned with these vicars; their history, their buildings and their archaeology. From their first appearance in the 12th century, the vicars' morals and behaviour were matters for concern, and Deans struggled to impose discipline. Documentary records of these struggles have survived well and, as presented here, they represent a major source for historians of the medieval city and Church. Eventually all English Cathedral vicars were subjected to quasi-monastic discipline and were housed in carefully designed and regulated colleges. Several of these important complexes have survived and, for the first time, all nine colleges are studied here, using documents, survey work and excavation. An extraordinary interdisciplinary resource is revealed. An initial section introduces the vicars choral, explaining their role within the English and European Church and exploring their central role in medieval liturgy and music-making. Detailed studies of the history, architectural history and archaeology of each of the nine English colleges are then followed by in-depth study of the York college, using the full range of documentary, architectural and archaeological resources to illustrate the life and times of this important group of priests.

English Historical Documents 1042 1189

(Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln, II, No. 313 (Lincoln Rec. Soc., XXVIII), p. 5) Robert, earl of Leicester, to all his men, both French and English, greeting. Know that I hold in the manor of Knighton 10 ...

English Historical Documents  1042 1189

"English Historical Documents is the most comprehensive, annotated collection of documents on British (not in reality just English) history ever compiled. Conceived during the Second World War with a view to ensuring the most important historical documents remained available and accessible in perpetuity, the first volume came out in 1953, and the most recent volume almost sixty years later. The print series, edited by David C. Douglas, is a magisterial survey of British history, covering the years 500 to 1914 and including around 5,500 primary sources, all selected by leading historians Editors. It has over the years become an indispensable resource for generations of students, researchers and lecturers. EHD is now available in its entirety online. Bringing EHD into the digital age has been a long and complex process. To provide you with first-rate, intelligent searchability, Routledge have teamed up with the Institute of Historical Research (one of the research institutes that make up the School of Advanced Study, University of London http://www.history.ac.uk) to produce EHD Online. The IHR's team of experts have fully indexed the documents, using an exhaustive historical thesaurus developed by the Royal Historical Society for its Bibliography of British and Irish History. The sources include treaties, statutes, declarations, government and cabinet proceedings, military dispatches, orders, acts, sermons, newspaper articles, pamphlets, personal and official letters, diaries and more. Each section of documents and many of the documents themselves are accompanied by editorial commentary. The sources cover a wide spectrum of topics, from political and constitutional issues to social, economic, religious as well as cultural history."--[Résumé de l'éditeur].

The Northern Danelaw

T. Arnold, Rolls Ser., 1882–5), I, 196—214 (selected chs trans. in EHD I, no.6) Institute of British Geographers, ... West Riding of Yorkshire, 8 pts, EPNS, 33 (1961–3) The Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln, ed.

The Northern Danelaw

Investigating the changing nature of lorship and peasant statuses, the transformation of estate structures, the emergence of villages, and the development of the parish system, D. M. Hadley also explains the peculiarities of the northern Danelaw and reassesses the impact of the Scandinavian settlements on its society and culture.A detailed local study is combined with a consideration of wider issues concerning Anglo-Saxon England and lond, and short-term changes unrelated to successive conquests.

Summoning St Michael

1940 , The Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln , Volume 5 , Lincoln Record Society 34 , Lincoln Major , K ( ed . ) , 1953 , The Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln , Volume 7 , Lincoln ...

Summoning St Michael

The earliest Romanesque towers of Lincolnshire constitute one of the most remarkable groupings of architectural remains at parish level, of the era of the Norman conquest of England. Forming west towers to a series of ordinary parish churches rather than parts of cathedrals or great monastic institutions, they are a distinctive feature of a number of the county's towns and villages. They have been variously described - as a group or individually - as Late Anglo-Saxon, Norman, or overlap in period. The fieldwork on which this study was based was undertaken as part of the British Academy's Corpus of Anglo-Saxon Stone Sculpture series. Given their late date, however, (all the sculptural material post-dated, and was probably stylistically derived from, work on the new Lincoln Cathedral of 1073 onwards) it was recognised that the value of the Lincolnshire material, and the way to extract a rich understanding from it, lay in treating the architecture of the towers as a whole, rather than soley cataloguing items of sculpture. The present book, while fully reporting on the sculptural details, also addresses the towers as whole architectural artefacts. It seeks an understanding of the social context in which late 11-Century buildings were erected, and explores the role of towers in the contemporary liturgy.

Proceedings of the Newcastle Upon Tyne Conference 1989

1160-3 of a requirement that distraint by the fee be by judgment of the lord's court , see Registrum Antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln , ed . C.W. Foster and K. Major ( Lincoln Rec . Soc . 1931-73 ) , ii . 5 ( no ...

Proceedings of the Newcastle Upon Tyne Conference  1989

Thirteen papers from the 1989 Newcastle-upon-Tyne conference.

William of Sherwood s Introduction to Logic

The Publications of the Lincoln Record Society, XX. ... 5 vols. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 1948-1949. Delisle, Leopold Victor. ... The Registrum antiquissimum of the Cathedral Church of Lincoln.

William of Sherwood s Introduction to Logic

William of Sherwood's Introduction to Logic was first published in 1966. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions. The Introduction to Logic by William of Sherwood, of which this is the first English translation, is the oldest surviving treatise which contains a treatment of the most distinctive and interesting medieval contributions to logic and semantics. Sherwood was a master at Oxford and Paris in the thirteenth century and the author of several logical treatises. Besides presenting material of interest in its own right, this volume is useful as an introduction to the study of those aspects of medieval philosophy that are most pertinent to the interests of contemporary philosophers. Professor Kretzmann has provided biographical, bibliographical, and philosophical backgrounds on Sherwood and an analytical table of contents.