Relics Ritual and Representation in Buddhism

This study examines the place of relic veneration in the history of South Asian Buddhism.

Relics  Ritual  and Representation in Buddhism

This study examines the place of relic veneration in the history of South Asian Buddhism.

Embodying the Dharma

This volume includes studies of relic traditions in India, Japan, Tibet, Sri Lanka, and Thailand, as well as broader comparative analyses, including comparisons of Buddhist and Christian relic veneration.

Embodying the Dharma

Examines the practice of relic veneration in a variety of forms of Buddhism.

Buddhism

In this strikingly illustrated and authoritative volume, readers have an introduction to one of the world's greatest living faiths. 200 color photos, maps & drawings.

Buddhism

In this strikingly illustrated and authoritative volume, readers have an introduction to one of the world's greatest living faiths. 200 color photos, maps & drawings.

Becoming the Buddha

14. Gérard Fussman, “Symbolisms of the Buddhist Stüpa,” Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies 9, no. 2 (1986): 40. 15. Ibid., 44. 16. Trainor, Relics, Ritual, and Representation in Buddhism ...

Becoming the Buddha

Becoming the Buddha is the first book-length study of a key ritual of Buddhist practice in Asia: the consecration of a Buddha image or "new Buddha," a ceremony by which the Buddha becomes present or alive. Through a richly detailed, accessible exploration of this ritual in northern Thailand, an exploration that stands apart from standard text-based or anthropological approaches, Donald Swearer makes a major contribution to our understanding of the Buddha image, its role in Buddhist devotional life, and its relationship to the veneration of Buddha relics. Blending ethnography, analysis, and Buddhist texts related to this mimetic reenactment of the night of the Buddha's enlightenment, he demonstrates that the image becomes the Buddha's surrogate by being invested with the Buddha's story and charged with the extraordinary power of Buddhahood. The process by which this transformation occurs through chant, sermon, meditation, and the presence of charismatic monks is at the heart of this book. Known as "opening the eyes of the Buddha," image consecration traditions throughout Buddhist Asia share much in common. Within the cultural context of northern Thailand, Becoming the Buddha illuminates scriptural accounts of the making of the first Buddha image; looks at debates over the ritual's historical origin, at Buddhological insights achieved, and at the hermeneutics of absence and presence; and provides a thematic comparison of several Buddhist traditions.

The History of the Buddha s Relic Shrine

21. Paranavitana, Epigraphia Zeylamica, 258–260. 22. Jayawickrama, The Chronicle of the Thüpa and the Thüpavamsa, 147. 23. Trainor, Relics, Ritual, and Representation in Buddhism, 45. 24. Ruppert, Jewel in the Ashes, 62. 25.

The History of the Buddha s Relic Shrine

Offering the complete English translation of the Buddhist chronicle called the 'Sinhala Thupavamsa', composed by Parākrama Paṇḍita in 13th century Sri Lanka, this work also relates the mythological history of the Buddhas previous lives as a bodhisattva and concludes with a prediction about the future Buddha Maitreya.

Jewel in the Ashes

Buddha Relics and Power in Early Medieval Japan Brian D. Ruppert. 8. See Tambiah, Buddhist Saints of the Forest and the ... See, e.g., Trainor, Relics, Ritual, and Representation in Buddhism, pp. 39-65. II. Srivastava, "New Light on the ...

Jewel in the Ashes

Focusing on the ninth to the fourteenth centuries, this study analyzes the ways in which relics functioned as material media for the interactions of Buddhist clerics, the imperial family, lay aristocrats, and warrior society and explores the multivocality of relics by dealing with specific historical examples. Brian Ruppert argues that relics offered means for reinforcing or subverting hierarchical relations. The author's critical literary and anthropological analyses attest to the prominence of relic veneration in government, in lay practice associated with the maintenance of the imperial line and warrior houses, and in the promotion of specific Buddhist sects in Japan.

Virtuous Bodies

See Trainor, Relics, Ritual, and Representation in Buddhism, 166–168, and Carter, Dhamma, 105, n. 173. 82. Trainor, Relics, Ritual, and Representation in Buddhism, 167. 83. Ibid. 84. Ibid., 169. 85. Ludowyk-Gyo ̈mro ̈i, ''Note on the ...

Virtuous Bodies

Investigating the diverse roles bodies play in Buddhist ethical development, this book takes an influential early medieval Indian Mahayana Buddhist text (Nullantideva's 'Compendium of Training') as a case study.

The Revival of Buddhist Monasticism in Medieval China

19–20 ; Kevin Trainor , Relics , Ritual and Representation in Buddhism : Rematerializing the Sri Lankan Theravada Tradition ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 1997 ) ; Gregory Schopen , “ Relic , ” in Critical Terms for ...

The Revival of Buddhist Monasticism in Medieval China

Original Scholarly Monograph

Relics of the Buddha

Taisho shinshu daizokyo [new Taisho era edition of the Buddhist canon] 1924– 29. 55 vols. Edited by J. Takakusu and K. Watanabe. ... Relics, Ritual, and Representation in Buddhism: Rematerializing the Sri Lankan Theravada Tradition.

Relics of the Buddha

Buddhism is popularly seen as a religion stressing the truth of impermanence. How, then, to account for the long-standing veneration, in Asian Buddhist communities, of bone fragments, hair, teeth, and other bodily bits said to come from the historic Buddha? Early European and American scholars of religion, influenced by a characteristic Protestant bias against relic worship, declared such practices to be superstitious and fraudulent, and far from the true essence of Buddhism. John Strong's book, by contrast, argues that relic veneration has played a serious and integral role in Buddhist traditions in South and Southeast Asia-and that it is in no way foreign to Buddhism. The book is structured around the life story of the Buddha, starting with traditions about relics of previous buddhas and relics from the past lives of the Buddha Sakyamuni. It then considers the death of the Buddha, the collection of his bodily relics after his cremation, and stories of their spread to different parts of Asia. The book ends with a consideration of the legend of the future parinirvana (extinction) of the relics prior to the advent of the next Buddha, Maitreya. Throughout, the author does not hesitate to explore the many versions of these legends and to relate them to their ritual, doctrinal, artistic, and social contexts.

Reading the Mah vamsa

For a discussion of this story, see Trainor, Relics, Ritual, and Representation in Buddhism, 146–147. See the Theravāda Vinaya I.3–4 and The Story of Gotama Buddha, Jayawickrama trans.

Reading the Mah  vamsa

Vamsa is a dynamic genre of Buddhist history filled with otherworldly characters and the exploits of real-life heroes. These narratives collapse the temporal distance between Buddha and the reader, building an emotionally resonant connection with an outsized religious figure and a longed-for past. The fifth-century Pali text Mahavamsa is a particularly effective example, using metaphor and other rhetorical devices to ethically transform readers, to stimulate and then to calm them. Reading the Mahavamsa advocates a new, literary approach to this text by revealing its embedded reading advice (to experience samvega and pasada) and affective work of metaphors (the Buddha's dharma as light) and salient characters (nagas). Kristin Scheible argues that the Mahavamsa requires a particular kind of reading. In the text's proem, special instructions draw readers to the metaphor of light and the nagas, or salient snake-beings, of the first chapter. Nagas are both model worshippers and unworthy hoarders of Buddha's relics. As nonhuman agents, they challenge political and historicist readings of the text. Scheible sees these slippery characters and the narrative's potent and playful metaphors as techniques for refocusing the reader's attention on the text's emotional aims. Her work explains the Mahavamsa's central motivational role in contemporary Sri Lankan Buddhist and nationalist circles. It also speaks broadly to strategies of reading religious texts and to the internal and external cues that give such works lives beyond the page.

Sacred Sites Rituals and Performances

From Buddha Bones to Bo Trees: Nehruvian India, Buddhism, and the poetics of power, 1947–1956. Modern Asian Studies 53: 1312–50. ... Relics, Ritual, and Representation in Buddhism: Rematerializing the Sri Lankan Theravada Tradition.

Sacred Sites  Rituals  and Performances

The conceptual territory of religious tourism is fluid. While recreation and leisure-based motivation and behaviors are evident in religious tourism, this volume reiterates its rootedness in tenets from religious traditions and pilgrimages. Using fresh perspectives on place-stories, rituals, performances, that are central to pilgrimage and sacred sites, essays in this volume explain contemporary expressions of religious tourism and illustrate the dynamic nature of religious tourism as an ecosystem embedded in religious practices, rituals and performances. The explanations will benefit researchers and practioners alike and they can find numerous examples that show the significance of religious tourism for sustainable development of destinations.

The Oxford Handbook of Buddhist Practice

Kevin Trainor, Relics, Ritual, and Representation in Buddhism: Rematerializing the Sri Lankan Theravāda Tradition (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997), 137. Trainor is summarizing Catherine Bell, Ritual Theory, Ritual Practice ...

The Oxford Handbook of Buddhist Practice

"This Handbook provides a state-of-the-art exploration of several key dynamics in current studies of the Buddhist tradition with a focus on practice. Embodiment, materiality, emotion, and gender shape the way most Buddhists engage with their traditions, in contrast to popular representations of Buddhism as spiritual, disembodied, and largely devoid of ritual. This volume highlights how practice often represents a fluid, dynamic, and strategic means of defining identity and negotiating the challenges of everyday life. Essays explore the transformational aims of practices that require practitioners to move, gesture, and emote in prescribed ways, including the ways that scholars' own embodied practices are integral to their research methodology. The chapters are written by acknowledged experts in their respective subject areas and taken together offer an overview of current thinking in the field. The volume is of particular value to scholars who seek an orientation to current perspectives on important conceptual, theoretical, and methodological concerns that are shaping the field in areas outside their primary expertise. The inclusion of substantial, up-to-date bibliographies also makes the volume an important guide to current scholarship"--

Nirvana for Sale

See Kevin Trainor , Relics , Ritual , and Representation in Buddhism : Rematerializing the Sri Lankan Theravada Tradition ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 1997 ) . As Trainor argues , the terms cetiya and stupa are used ...

Nirvana for Sale

Explores the relationship between material prosperity and spirituality in contemporary Thai Buddhism.

The Hindu Monastery in South India

Prajavani, the Kannada newspaper, August 2, 2018 published a news about the rituals that were performed for the Uttaradi maṭha pontiff. 34. Trainor, Kevin. Relics, Ritual and Representation in Buddhism: Rematerializing the Śri Lankan ...

The Hindu Monastery in South India

This study analyzes the role of asceticism, icons, and the guru in South India. Tracing the development of Hindu monastic orders, the author analyzes the growth of these institutions from educational establishments to centers of traditional socio-religious authority, centering her argument on the phenomenon of guru whole-body relics.--Sthaneshwar Timalsina, San Diego State University

Buddhism in the Shadow of Brahmanism

(2004a): “Buddhist relics in comparative perspective: beyond the parallels.” = Germano & Trainor, 2004: 27–49. —— (2007): “Two Buddha relic traditions. ... Trainor, Kevin (1997): Relics, Ritual, and Representation in Buddhism.

Buddhism in the Shadow of Brahmanism

This book deals with the confrontation of Buddhism and Brahmanism in India. Both depended on support from the royal court, but Buddhism had less to offer in return than Brahmanism. Buddhism developed in a manner to make up for this.

In Defense of Dharma

What is He Doing: Religious Rhetoric and Performance in Sri Lanka during R. Premadasa's President 1 1989-1993t. Amsterdam: VU University Press. 1995. p. 30. 5 K. Trainor. Relics. Ritual. and Representation in Buddhism: Rematerializing ...

In Defense of Dharma

This is the first book to examine war and violence in Sri Lanka through the lens of cross-cultural studies on just-war tradition and theory. In a study that is textual, historical and anthropological, it is argued that the ongoing Sinhala-Tamil conflict is in actual practice often justified by a resort to religious stories that allow for war when Buddhism is in peril. Though Buddhism is commonly assumed to be a religion that never allows for war, this study suggests otherwise, thereby bringing Buddhism into the ethical dialogue on religion and war. Without a realistic consideration of just-war thinking in contemporary Sri Lanka, it will remain impossible to understand the power of religion there to create both peace and war.

Critical Readings on Tang China

11 Kevin Trainor, Relics, Ritual and Representation in Buddhism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997), p. 89. Another very useful summary may be found in Steven Collins, Nirvana and other Buddhist Felicities (Cambridge: ...

Critical Readings on Tang China

The Tang dynasty, lasting from 618 to 907, was the high point of medieval Chinese history, featuring unprecedented achievements in governmental organization, economic and territorial expansion, literature, the arts, and religion. Many Tang practices continued, with various developments, to influence Chinese society for the next thousand years. For these and other reasons the Tang has been a key focus of Western sinologists. This volume presents English-language reprints of fifty-seven critical studies of the Tang, in the three general categories of political history, literature and cultural history, and religion. The articles and book chapters included here are important scholarly benchmarks that will serve as the starting-point for anyone interested in the study of medieval China.

Buddhist History in the Vernacular

Much of the Thâpavamfisas' narrative describing how relics of the Buddha were obtained and enshrined in LaÙkÅ was ... Kevin Trainor, Relics, Ritual and Representation in Buddhism: Rematerializing the TheravÅda Tradition (Cambridge: ...

Buddhist History in the Vernacular

The Index Buddhicus is the first classified comprehensive bibliography of Buddhist Studies. It describes secondary material ranging from articles, papers and chapters appearing in journals, proceedings and collections, through reference works, monographs, editions and theses, to digital resources. All entries are linked to an elaborate index of both proper names and thematic, and cross referenced to related material. The Index is available as an online resource.

Places in Motion

1913), 231–272, and also Foucher's “The Beginnings of Buddhist Art,” in his The Beginnings of Buddhist Art and Other Essays in ... For a discussion of this tension, see Kevin Trainor, Relics, Ritual, And Representation in Buddhism: ...

Places in Motion

Jacob Kinnard offers an in-depth examination of the complex dynamics of religiously charged places. Focusing on several important shared and contested pilgrimage places-Ground Zero and Devils Tower in the United States, Ayodhya and Bodhgaya in India, Karbala in Iraq-he poses a number of crucial questions. What and who has made these sites important, and why? How are they shared, and how and why are they contested? What is at stake in their contestation? How are the particular identities of place and space established? How are individual and collective identity intertwined with space and place? Challenging long-accepted, clean divisions of the religious world, Kinnard explores specific instances of the vibrant messiness of religious practice, the multivocality of religious objects, the fluid and hybrid dynamics of religious places, and the shifting and tangled identities of religious actors. He contends that sacred space is a constructed idea: places are not sacred in and of themselves, but are sacred because we make them sacred. As such, they are in perpetual motion, transforming themselves from moment to moment and generation to generation. Places in Motion moves comfortably across and between a variety of historical and cultural settings as well as academic disciplines, providing a deft and sensitive approach to the topic of sacred places, with awareness of political, economic, and social realities as these exist in relation to questions of identity. It is a lively and much needed critical advance in analytical reflections on sacred space and pilgrimage.

The Buddha in Lanna

Tamnan Phra That Chao Lamphun lae Tamnan Wat Ton Kaeo [Chronicle of the relic of Lamphun and Chronicle of Wat Ton Kaeo], Siam Society, Bangkok, EFEO 001 005, 21B–25B. ... Trainor, Relics, Ritual, and Representation in Buddhism, 134. 24.

The Buddha in Lanna

For centuries, wherever Thai Buddhists have made their homes, statues of the Buddha have provided striking testament to the role of Buddhism in the lives of the people. The Buddha in Lanna offers the first in-depth historical study of the Thai tradition of donation of Buddha statues. Drawing on palm-leaf manuscripts and inscriptions, many never previously translated into English, the book reveals the key roles that Thai Buddha images have played in the social and economic worlds of their makers and devotees from the fifteenth to twentieth centuries. Author Angela Chiu introduces stories from chronicles, histories, and legends written by monks in Lanna, a region centered in today’s northern Thailand. By examining the stories’ themes, structures, and motifs, she illuminates the complex conceptual and material aspects of Buddha images that influenced their functions in Lanna society. Buddha images were depicted as social agents and mediators, the focal points of pan-regional political-religious lineages and rivalries, indeed, as the very generators of history itself. In the chronicles, Buddha images also unified the Buddha with the northern Thai landscape, thereby integrating Buddhist and local conceptions of place. By comparing Thai Buddha statues with other representations of the Buddha, the author underscores the contribution of the Thai evidence to a broader understanding of how different types of Buddha representations were understood to mediate the “presence” of the Buddha. The Buddha in Lanna focuses on the Thai Buddha image as a part of the wider society and history of its creators and worshippers beyond monastery walls, shedding much needed light on the Buddha image in history. With its impressive range of primary sources, this book will appeal to students and scholars of Buddhism and Buddhist art history, Thai studies, and Southeast Asian religious studies.