Typology of Seventeenth Century Literature

Renaissance and Seventeenth-Century Studies (New York: Columbia University Press, 1964). McKenzie, John L., S.J., The Two Edged Sword (Milwaukee: Bruce Publishing Co., 1956). —, Myths and Realities: Studies in Biblical Theology ...

Typology of Seventeenth Century Literature


The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature Volume 1 600 1660

Anglicanism : the thought criticism and research , Cambridge 1942 . and practice of the Church of England , illustrated from Johnson , F. R. Astronomical thought in Renaissance the religious literature of the 17th century . 1935 .

The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature  Volume 1  600 1660

More than fifty specialists have contributed to this new edition of volume 1 of The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature. The design of the original work has established itself so firmly as a workable solution to the immense problems of analysis, articulation and coordination that it has been retained in all its essentials for the new edition. The task of the new contributors has been to revise and integrate the lists of 1940 and 1957, to add materials of the following decade, to correct and refine the bibliographical details already available, and to re-shape the whole according to a new series of conventions devised to give greater clarity and consistency to the entries.

Ineffability Naming the Unnamable

Among the more valuable studies of Herbert's thought and style in his poetry are the following: Rosemond Tuve, ... Signs" in his Renaissance and Seventeenth-Century Studies (New York and London: Columbia Univ. Press, 1964), pp. 22-23.

Ineffability  Naming the Unnamable


Generating Texts

Voices of Melancholy : Studies in Literary Treatments of Melancholy in Renaissance England . London : Routledge , 1971 . MacDonald , Michael . Mystical Bedlam : Madness , Anxiety , and Healing in Seventeenth - Century England .

Generating Texts

In Generating Texts, Sharon Cadman Seelig tests traditional notions of genre by analyzing parallels between works that confound existing categories. Seelig pairs three seventeenth-century prose works with three other works, each of a later century: Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy with Sterne's Tristram Shandy, Browne's Religio Medici with Thoreau's Walden, and Donne's Devotions upon Emergent Occasions with Eliot's Four Quartets. Proceeding from her authors' similarities in method and common sets of assumptions (such as concern with process and discovery, time and eternity, or the nature of the self), she uncovers parallels showing that genre is not simply a set of formal features but rather a particular way of seeing the world that grows out of authorial attitude, impulse, and occasion. In addition to its obvious appeal to students and scholars interested in Sterne, Thoreau, Eliot or seventeenth-century literature, Generating Texts should interest literary scholars and students more generally, particularly those concerned with the interconnections between literary periods and genres. Seelig has written an original and accessible contribution to the field of genre study.

A Reference Guide for English Studies

Hamilton , A. C. “ The Modern Study of Renaissance English Literature : A Critical Survey . ” MLQ 26 ( 1965 ) : 150–183 . Summers , Joseph H. “ Notes on Recent Studies in English Literature of the Earlier 17th Century ...

A Reference Guide for English Studies


The Rhetoric of the Conscience in Donne Herbert and Vaughan

Mazzeo, J. A., Renaissance and Seventeenth-century Studies (New York: Columbia University Press, 1964). McCutcheon, E., Sir Nicholas Bacon's Great House Sententiae (Amherst, MA: ELR, 1977). McKay, F. M., 'A Note on Richard Verstegan's ...

The Rhetoric of the Conscience in Donne  Herbert  and Vaughan

There is a kind of conscience some men keepe, Is like a Member that's benumb'd with sleepe; Which, as it gathers Blood, and wakes agen, It shoots, and pricks, and feeles as bigg as ten Donne, Herbert, and Vaughan see the conscience as only partly theirs, only partly under their control. Of course, as theologians said, it ought to be a simple syllogism, comparing actions to God's law, and giving judgement, in a joint procedure of the soul and its maker. Inevitably, though, there are problems. Hearts refuse to confess, or forget the rules, or jumble them up, or refuse to come to the point when delivering a verdict. The three poets are beady-eyed experts on failure. After all, where subjects can only discover their authentic nature in relation to the divine it matters whether the conversation works. Remarkably, each poet - despite their very different devotional backgrounds - uses similar sets of tropes to investigate problems: enigma, aposiopesis (breaking off), chiasmus, subjectio (asking then answering a question), and antanaclasis (repetition with a difference). Structured like a language, the conscience is tortured, rewritten, read, and broken up to engineer a proper response. Considering the faculty as an uncomfortable extrusion of the divine into the everyday, the rhetoric of the conscience transforms Protestant into prosthetic poetics. It moves between early modern theology, rhetoric, and aesthetic theory to give original, scholarly, and committed readings of the great metaphysical poets. Topics covered include boredom, torture, graffiti, tattoos, anthologizing, resentment, tears, dust, casuistry, and opportunism.

John Donne and Baroque Allegory

Marcus, Leah S. “Recent Studies in Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama.” Studies in English Literature, 1500–1900 32 (1992): 361–406. Unediting the Renaissance: Shakespeare, Marlowe, Milton. ... Renaissance and Seventeenth-Century Studies.

John Donne and Baroque Allegory

Provides a new appreciation of John Donne through the lens of Walter Benjamin's critical theory of baroque allegory.

Shakespeare s Perjured Eye

Signs , ” in Renaissance and Seventeenth Century Studies ( New York : Columbia Univ . Press , 1964 ) , 19 ; see chap . 2 for the application to Metaphysical poetry . Walter Ong , to take a very different example , stressing the Ramistic ...

Shakespeare s Perjured Eye

Fineman argues that in the sonnets Shakespeare developed an unprecedented poetic persona, one that subsequently became the governing model of all literary subjectivity. This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1986.

Dramatic Extracts in Seventeenth Century English Manuscripts

Edition of Early Modern Sources. ... “Of Common Places, or Memorial Books”: A Seventeenth-Century Manuscript from the James Marshall and Marie-Louise Osborn Collection. ... Research Opportunities in Renaissance Drama 26 (1981): 51–155.

Dramatic Extracts in Seventeenth Century English Manuscripts

Throughout the seventeenth century, early modern play readers and playgoers copied dramatic extracts (selections from plays and masques) into their commonplace books, verse miscellanies, diaries, and songbooks. Dramatic Extracts in Seventeenth-Century English Manuscripts: Watching, Reading, Changing Plays is the first to examine these often overlooked texts, which reveal what early modern audiences and readers took, literally and figuratively, from plays. As this under-examined archival evidence shows, play readers and playgoers viewed plays as malleable and modular texts to be altered, appropriated, and, most importantly, used. These records provide information that is not available in other forms about the popularity and importance of early modern plays, the reasons plays appealed to their audiences, and the ideas in plays that most interested audiences. Tracing the course of dramatic extracting from the earliest stages in the 1590s, through the prolific manuscript circulation at the universities, to the closure and reopening of the theatres, Estill gathers these microhistories to create a comprehensive overview of seventeenth-century dramatic extracts and the culture of extracting from plays. Dramatic Extracts in Seventeenth-Century English Manuscripts: Watching, Reading, Changing Plays explores new archival evidence (from John Milton’s signature to unpublished university plays) while also analyzing the popularity of perennial favorites such as Shakespeare’s The Tempest. The study of dramatic extracts is the study of particulars: particular readers, particular manuscripts, particular plays or masques, particular historic moments. As D. F. McKenzie puts it, “different readers [bring] the text to life in different ways.” By providing careful analyses of these rich source texts, this book shows how active play-viewing and play-reading (that is, extracting) ultimately led to changing the plays themselves, both through selecting and manipulating the extracts and positioning the plays in new contexts. Published by University of Delaware Press. Distributed worldwide by Rutgers University Press.

Myth Emblem and Music in Shakespeare s Cymbeline

See my " Eros and Anteros in Shakespeare's Sonnets 153 and 154 : An Iconographical Study , " Spenser Studies 7 ( 1987 ) : 261-86 and 311-22 . 17. J. A. Mazzeo , Renaissance and Seventeenth - Century Studies ( New York : Columbia ...

Myth  Emblem  and Music in Shakespeare s Cymbeline

"Winner of the University of Delaware Press Award for the best manuscript in Shakespearean Studies, this study clarifies and revitalizes Shakespeare's Cymbeline for the modern reader through a rediscovery of the poet's artistic use of Renaissance myths, symbols, and emblematic topoi that give meaning to the play. Although mainly concerned with the rich classical and Christian iconography of Cymbeline, the book also rages widely over Shakespeare's dramatic and nondramatic works and beyond to the work of his contemporaries in Renaissance poetry, drama, art, theology, philosophy, emblems, and myths to show parallels between the mysteries of this tragicomedy and other examples of Renaissance thought and expression. It uncovers actual representations in the visual arts of parallels to the play's descriptive and theatrical moments. These iconographic parallels are lavishly illustrated in the book through photographs of Renaissance plaster work, embroidery, metalwork, oil paintings, and sculpture, but primarily through woodcuts and engravings from English and Continental emblem books of the period. The visual imagery is carefully related to an intellectual explanation of Cymbeline's complex Neoplatonic and Reformation themes." "The author begins with a extended definition of the genre of Renaissance tragicomedy, a form developed for Christian artistic purposes in Italy by Tasso and Guarini. Aside from the obviously similar characteristics of a happy ending and the presence of an oracle, Cymbeline shares nine other artistic aspects with the pioneer Italian tragicomedies Aminta and Il pastor fido, including the celebration of an Orphic ritual of death and resurrection. After a discussion of the Neoplatonic and Ovidian mythology embedded in the play, the book considers in detail the iconography of Imogen's elaborately decorated bedroom as a reconciliation of opposites, the iconography of primitivism and Wild Men versus courtier as a satire of the British court, and the iconography of birds, animals, vegetation, and minerals as evocative of the major themes of doubt, repentance, reformation, reunion, and regeneration in Cymbeline. The final objective of the dramatic conflict is mutual forgiveness and a happy marriage, all of which is achieved through temperance or the attainment of musical concord within the individual, the state, and the world. Although Shakespeare shows the five senses to be an inadequate means for his characters to recognize true virtue in a deceitful world, the sense of hearing is the most important in the play, since it allows participation in the four redemptive functions of sound, which ultimately leads to psychological harmony with the music of the spheres." "Simonds also demonstrates that because Cymbeline is essentially an Orphic tragicomedy designed to liberate the audience from melancholy, the play strives to bring delight through its theatrical reenactment of the initially painful Platonic journey from Eros to Anteros, from blindness to a vision of divinity, from discord to musical harmony, from spiritual confusion to joyful enlightenment."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Seventeenth Century Fiction

Ros Ballaster is Professor of 18th Century Studies at Mansfield College, University of Oxford. Warren Boutcher is Professor of Renaissance Studies at Queen Mary University of London. Nicolas Correard is Lecturer in Comparative ...

Seventeenth Century Fiction

In the past few years, discussion of fiction in all sorts of media has intensified. The prominence of literary critics has increased, the awarding of lucrative book prizes has become more publicized, and reports of the formation of reading groups have proliferated. Seventeenth-Century Fiction: Text & Transmission responds to the present interest in the novel by offering a fresh approach to the history of early modern fiction that shifts away from the outmoded 'rise-of-the-novel' perspective and reaches beyond the boundaries of a single national literature. Starting from the literary text and looking outwards, this volume focuses on the changes in prose forms and their usage at a critical point in the evolution of modern fiction, and comes to grips with the instabilities of the novel and novella during this period. It explores the nature of seventeenth-century fiction and examines how authors fused fictional and non-fictional materials to create new, hybrid genres. Furthermore, it takes into consideration the cultural interchange between different geographical regions and languages (English, French, Spanish, Italian, Neo-Latin), and uncovers the deeper roots of seventeenth-century literary innovation, by casting light on the Continental influences on the formation of the English novel and on the role played by women's writings at the time. This landmark volume not only contributes to a more comprehensive history of the novel but promotes an authentic appreciation of early modern fiction.

The Cambridge History of the English Language

Renaissance and Seventeenth - Century Studies . New York : Columbia University Press , London : Routledge & Kegan Paul . McGann , J. J. ( 1996 ) . The Poetics of Sensibility : a Revolution in Literary Style . Oxford : Clarendon Press .

The Cambridge History of the English Language

This volume spans Middle English, Early Modern English and the early stages of modern language.

Reading Early Modern Women

Binghamton : Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies , 1995 . Rose , Mary Beth . “ Gender , Genre , and History : Seventeenth - Century English Women and the Art of Autobiography . ” Women in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance ...

Reading Early Modern Women

This remarkable anthology assembles for the first time 144 primary texts and documents written by women between 1550 and 1700 and reveals an unprecedented view of the intellectual and literary lives of women in early modern England

Fifteenth Century Studies

Includes a selection of papers presented at the Fifteenth-Century Symposia, 1977-

Fifteenth Century Studies

Includes a selection of papers presented at the Fifteenth-Century Symposia, 1977-

The Age of Milton An Encyclopedia of Major 17th Century British and American Authors

An Encyclopedia of Major 17th-Century British and American Authors Alan Hager ... Scholars' Bedlam: Menippean Satire in the Renaissance. ... Voices of Melancholy: Studies in Literary Treatments of Melancholy in Renaissance England.

The Age of Milton  An Encyclopedia of Major 17th Century British and American Authors

The 17th century was a time of significant cultural and political change. The era saw the rise of exploration and travel, the growth of the scientific method, and the spread of challenges to conventional religion. Many of these developments occurred in England and North America, and literature of the period reflects the intellectual and emotional fervor of the age. This reference chronicles the lives and works of more than 75 British and American writers of the 17th century. Included are entries on such major canonical authors as Donne, Milton, and Jonson. The volume also covers the writings of such leading thinkers as Hobbes and Locke, along with the works of leading European figures like Galileo and Descartes. Also profiled are numerous significant women writers, including Mary Astell, Aphra Behn, and Anne Killigrew. Each entry is written by an expert contributor and includes a biography, a discussion of major works and themes, a survey of the writer's critical reception, and primary and secondary bibliographies. The volume additionally includes entries on several artists who significantly influenced British and American literary culture.

Crossing Boundaries

This volume contains the proceedings from the 1997 symposium "Attending to Early Modern Women: Crossing Boundaries, " which was sponsored by the Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Crossing Boundaries

This volume contains the proceedings from the 1997 symposium "Attending to Early Modern Women: Crossing Boundaries, " which was sponsored by the Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. It provides a detailed overview of current research in early modern women's studies.

Du Bartas Legacy in England and Scotland

... online edition Philological Quarterly Review of English Studies Renaissance Quarterly Renaissance Studies The Seventeenth Century Studies in English Literature, 1500–1900 Sidney Journal Scottish Literary Review The Divine Weeks and ...

Du Bartas  Legacy in England and Scotland

Guillaume de Saluste Du Bartas was the most popular and widely-imitated poet in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England and Scotland. C. S. Lewis felt that a reconsideration of his works' British reception was 'long overdue' back in the 1950s, and this study finally provides the first comprehensive account of how English-speaking authors read, translated, imitated, and eventually discarded Du Bartas' model for Protestant poetry. The first part shows that Du Bartas' friendship with James VI and I was key to his later popularity. Du Bartas' poetry symbolized a transnational Protestant literary culture in Huguenot France and Britain. Through Jamesâ intervention, Scottish literary tastes had a significant impact in England. Later chapters assess how Sidney, Spenser, Milton, and many other poets justified writing poetic fictions in reaction to Du Bartas' austere emphasis on scriptural truth. These chapters give equal attention to how Du Bartas' example offered a route into original verse composition for male and female poets across the literate population. Du Bartas' Legacy in England and Scotland responds to recent developments in transnational and translation studies, the history of reading, women's writing, religious literature, and manuscript studies. It argues that Du Bartas' legacy deserves far greater prominence than it has previously received because it offers a richer, more democratic, and more accurate view of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English, Scottish, and French literature and religious culture.

Time Space and Motion in the Age of Shakespeare

Joseph A. Mazzeo, Renaissance and Seventeenth-Century Studies (New York: Columbia University Press, 1964), chapter entitled “Notes on Donne's Alchemical Imagery,” 89. The aesthetic of such imagery, as Pallavicino said, “consists in the ...

Time  Space  and Motion in the Age of Shakespeare

Theirs was a world of exploration and experimentation, of movement and growth--and in this, the thinkers of the Renaissance, poets and scientists alike, followed their countrymen into uncharted territory and unthought space. A book that takes us to the very heart of the enterprise of the Renaissance, this closely focused but far-reaching work by the distinguished scholar Angus Fletcher reveals how early modern science and English poetry were in many ways components of one process: discovering and expressing the secrets of motion, whether in the language of mathematics or verse. Throughout his book, Fletcher is concerned with one main crisis of knowledge and perception, and indeed cognition generally: the desire to find a correct theory of motion that could only end with Newton's Laws. Beginning with the achievement of Galileo--which changed the world--Time, Space, and Motion identifies the problem of motion as the central cultural issue of the time, pursued through the poetry of the age, from Marlowe and Shakespeare to Ben Jonson and Milton, negotiated through the limits and the limitless possibilities of language much as it was through the constraints of the physical world.

The Research Project

'Renaissance' leads you at once to Renaissance & Reformation, Renaissance Studies and Renaissance Quarterly. But then comes Sixteenth Century Journal, and perhaps Seventeenth Century. The Renaissance takes in history, culture, ...

The Research Project

Now in its fifth edition, this guide to project work continues to be an indispensable resource for all students undertaking research. Guiding the reader right through from preliminary stages to completion, The Research Project: How to write it sets out in clear and concise terms the main tasks involved in doing a research project, covering: choosing a topic using the library effectively taking notes shaping and composing the project providing footnotes, documentation and a bibliography avoiding common pitfalls. Fully updated throughout, this new edition features a chapter on making the most out of the Internet, from knowing where to start, to assessing the quality of the material found there. Other features include a model example of a well researched, clearly written paper with notes and bibliography and a chapter on getting published in a learned journal for more advanced researchers. Whether starting out or experienced in research, The Research Project: How to write it is an essential tool for success.