Republic Not a Democracy

Drawing on the story of 2019—when America saw its lowest unemployment rate in a half-century and a record low poverty rate—Adam explains how we can restore America in a post-COVID-19 pandemic world.

Republic  Not a Democracy

Let Adam Brandon, one of America’s leading activists, explain the past, the present, and the future of American conservatism, and offer advice from his unique perspective on how to bridge the generational and political divides in the United States for a better future. America faces incredibly consequential choices over the direction of the nation. Far-left Democrats who label themselves as “progressives” want to shatter constitutional norms and move America backward through command-and-control economic policies while continuing to divide us with identity politics. In A Republic, Not a Democracy, FreedomWorks President Adam Brandon draws on his experiences from when he was a kid in Ohio, his time in post-communist Poland, and his current role in Washington, DC to offer perspective on the choices that America has before it. He uses these experiences to provide a unique take on how to win voters with a pro-growth message on economic policy. Drawing on the story of 2019—when America saw its lowest unemployment rate in a half-century and a record low poverty rate—Adam explains how we can restore America in a post-COVID-19 pandemic world. He highlights key policy issues like education, health care, and the age-demographic crisis and what lawmakers can do to address these problems. As president of the country’s largest free-market grassroots advocacy organization, Adam is the nation’s foremost expert in effective grassroots strategy. He uses this expertise to explain the importance of grassroots activists and using these committed constitutionalists to change the minds of lawmakers in the Swamp. A Republic, Not a Democracy is an essential resource for anyone seeking to understand the state of modern politics, for anyone who wants to use grassroots activism to make a difference in the world, and for anyone who wonders about what the future holds for America and its citizens.

Republic Not a Democracy

Conservatives and the Republican Party have serious challenges. ... Conservative politicians aren't speaking beyond the base of the Republican Party. ... We have to be there all the time, not every two or four years.

Republic  Not a Democracy

Let Adam Brandon, one of America’s leading activists, explain the past, the present, and the future of American conservatism, and offer advice from his unique perspective on how to bridge the generational and political divides in the United States for a better future. America faces incredibly consequential choices over the direction of the nation. Far-left Democrats who label themselves as “progressives” want to shatter constitutional norms and move America backward through command-and-control economic policies while continuing to divide us with identity politics. In A Republic, Not a Democracy, FreedomWorks President Adam Brandon draws on his experiences from when he was a kid in Ohio, his time in post-communist Poland, and his current role in Washington, DC to offer perspective on the choices that America has before it. He uses these experiences to provide a unique take on how to win voters with a pro-growth message on economic policy. Drawing on the story of 2019—when America saw its lowest unemployment rate in a half-century and a record low poverty rate—Adam explains how we can restore America in a post-COVID-19 pandemic world. He highlights key policy issues like education, health care, and the age-demographic crisis and what lawmakers can do to address these problems. As president of the country’s largest free-market grassroots advocacy organization, Adam is the nation’s foremost expert in effective grassroots strategy. He uses this expertise to explain the importance of grassroots activists and using these committed constitutionalists to change the minds of lawmakers in the Swamp. A Republic, Not a Democracy is an essential resource for anyone seeking to understand the state of modern politics, for anyone who wants to use grassroots activism to make a difference in the world, and for anyone who wonders about what the future holds for America and its citizens.

The People Have Spoken and They Are Wrong

After many years of writing about democracy for a living, David Harsanyi has concluded that it’s the most overrated, overused, and misunderstood idea in political life.

The People Have Spoken  and They Are Wrong

Democracy may be one of the most admired ideas ever concocted, but what if it’s also one of the most harebrained? After many years of writing about democracy for a living, David Harsanyi has concluded that it’s the most overrated, overused, and misunderstood idea in political life. The less we have of it the better. “Democracy” is not synonymous with “freedom.” It is not the opposite of tyranny. In fact, the Founding Fathers knew that democracy can lead to tyranny. That’s why they built so many safeguards against it into the Constitution. Democracy, Harsanyi argues, has made our government irrational, irresponsible, and invasive. It has left the American people with only two options—domination by the majority or a government that can’t possibly work. The modern age has imbued democracy with the mystique of infallibility. But Harsanyi reminds us that the vast majority of political philosophers, including the founders, have thought that responsible, limited government based on direct majority rule over a large, let alone continental scale was a practical impossibility. In The People Have Spoken, you’ll learn: Why the Framers of our Constitution were intent on establishing a republic, not a “democracy” How democracy undermines self-government How shockingly out of touch with reality most voters really are Why democracy is an economic wrecking ball—and an invitation to a politics of envy and corruption How the great political philosophers from Plato and Aristotle to Burke and Tocqueville predicted with uncanny accuracy that democracy could lead to tyranny Harsanyi warns that if we don’t recover the Founders’ republican vision, “democracy” might very well spell the end of American liberty and prosperity.

Republic

Welcome to the age of #Republic. In this revealing book, New York Times bestselling author Cass Sunstein shows how today’s Internet is driving political fragmentation, polarization, and even extremism--and what can be done about it.

 Republic

"As the Internet grows more sophisticated, it is creating new threats to democracy. Social media companies such as Facebook can sort us ever more efficiently into groups of the like-minded, creating echo chambers that amplify our views. It's no accident that on some occasions, people of different political views cannot even understand each other. It's also no surprise that terrorist groups have been able to exploit social media to deadly effect. Welcome to the age of #Republic. In this revealing book, Cass Sunstein, the New York Times bestselling author of Nudge and The World According to Star Wars, shows how today's Internet is driving political fragmentation, polarization, and even extremism--and what can be done about it. Thoroughly rethinking the critical relationship between democracy and the Internet, Sunstein describes how the online world creates "cybercascades," exploits "confirmation bias," and assists "polarization entrepreneurs." And he explains why online fragmentation endangers the shared conversations, experiences, and understandings that are the lifeblood of democracy. In response, Sunstein proposes practical and legal changes to make the Internet friendlier to democratic deliberation. These changes would get us out of our information cocoons by increasing the frequency of unchosen, unplanned encounters and exposing us to people, places, things, and ideas that we would never have picked for our Twitter feed. #Republic need not be an ironic term. As Sunstein shows, it can be a rallying cry for the kind of democracy that citizens of diverse societies most need. "--

A Pure Theory of Democracy

The author builds a realistic theory of democracy to end the false idea that corruption, state crime, and public immorality are democracy's (undesirable) products, not the natural and inevitable fruits of oligarchic regimes.

A Pure Theory of Democracy

The author builds a realistic theory of democracy to end the false idea that corruption, state crime, and public immorality are democracy's (undesirable) products, not the natural and inevitable fruits of oligarchic regimes. Important theories of the state and constitution exist, but none can be called a theory of democracy.

WHY INDIAN CELEBRATE REPUBLIC DAY

Contents 1.

WHY INDIAN CELEBRATE REPUBLIC DAY

Contents 1. What is Republic Day of India? 2. What is Republic? 3. Republics that are not democratic 4. Many countries of South America Democracies that are not republics 5. Indian Government 6. Tradition of Republics in the West 7. History of The Republic of India 8. Chief guests in republic day parade 9. Some important information What is Republic Day of India? Republic Day is a national festival of India which is celebrated on 26 January every year. The Constitution of India was enacted on the same day in 1950 by removing the Government of India Act (Act) (1935). The Constitution was adopted by the Indian Constituent Assembly on 26 November 1949 to become an independent republic and to establish the rule of law in the country and was implemented on 26 January 1950 with a democratic government system. 26 January was chosen because it was on this day in 1930 that the Indian National Congress (INC) declared India a complete Swaraj. It is one of the three national holidays of India, the other two being Independence Day and Gandhi Jayanti What is Republic? A republic or republic (Latin: race publica) is a form of government in which the country is considered a "public matter", not a private institution or property of rulers. The primary positions of power within a republic are not inherited. It is a form of government under which the head of the state does not have a king. The definition of a Republic in particular refers to a form of government in which individuals represent a civil body and exercise power according to the rule of law under a constitution, and which includes the separation of powers with the head of the elected state. Happens, and the state of which refers to the constitutional state or representative democracy. As of 2017, 159 of the world's 206 sovereign states use the word "republic" as part of their official name - not all these republics by the meaning of elected governments, nor "republic" in the names of all nations with elected governments. The term is used. Even though state heads often claim that they govern only with the "consent of the governed", the election in some countries is more of a "show" for the real purpose of providing citizens with the real ability to choose their own leaders. Has been found A republic (from Sanskrit; "gana": public, "state": princely state / country) is a country where in the government of the principle, any person from the general public can occupy the highest post of the country. Such a regime is called a republic (Sanskrit; gana: whole public, tantra: system; system controlled by the masses). "Democracy" or "democracy" is different from this. A democracy is a democracy where the rule is actually run by the will of the general public or its majority. Today most countries of the world are republics and along with it democratic. India is itself a democratic republic.

A Republic Not an Empire

A commentary on America's foreign policy argues that we are being put at risk and examines the need for a new foreign policy that will put America first.

A Republic  Not an Empire

A commentary on America's foreign policy argues that we are being put at risk and examines the need for a new foreign policy that will put America first.

Environment and Democracy in the Czech Republic

This is a well researched and well written piece of work which will make a valuable contribution to the existing literature.

Environment and Democracy in the Czech Republic

. . . the book s contents will appeal to academics working within the fields of environmental politics or central and east European studies, as well as to political or social scientists with an interest in SMO development. David Benson, Environmental Politics Environment and Democracy in the Czech Republic is a succinct, well written and scrupulously researched book. . . Sean Hanley, Europe Asia Studies . . . this book provides a well-researched survey of the development of the environmental movement in the Czech Republic and of its role in relation to the democratic transition process. . . For scholars and students looking at environmental politics in Central and Eastern Europe, it provides a wealth of information that will be useful in conducting comparative studies. Alberto Costi, European Environment Fagan has written a well-researched analysis of the evolving role and status of Czech EMOs since the overthrow of communism. John M. Kramer, Slavic Review This volume presents an original study of the development of the environmental movement in the Czech Republic, particularly in relation to the democratic transition process. It offers a broad, historical analysis of the evolution of the movement through the 1990s to the present day, and presents rich case studies on a number of environmental organisations. The detailed empirical work reveals interesting insights into the character of contemporary Czech politics and the difficulties faced by the environmental movement. This is a well researched and well written piece of work which will make a valuable contribution to the existing literature. James Meadowcroft, University of Sheffield, UK Since a handful of environmental activists helped to bring down the communist regime in Czechoslovakia, the arena of environmental politics has offered a valuable lens on the transition process, providing a unique insight into the contradictory and highly contingent relationship between democratisation and neo-liberalism. Environment and Democracy in the Czech Republic offers a radical perspective on the democratisation process, revealing the extent to which the consolidation of a politically efficacious and diverse civil society is far more complex than the earlier generation of commentators acknowledged. The environmental movement has not flourished under political democracy; its radical activists have been marginalized and targeted by the state, their ideologies and strategies compromised and their critical voice silenced. Yet the book concludes that whilst the mainstream environmental movement has become institutionalised and appears incapable of representing community interests, the environmental issue retains the capacity to mobilise, this time against the neo-liberal agenda of the democratic government. This definitive account of the evolution of the Czech environmental movement since 1990 offers a radical evaluation of the institutions and practice of political democracy, and challenges some of the certainties of social movement theory. Although focused on the Czech Republic, the book will undoubtedly contribute to a better understanding of the role of environmental movements within contemporary politics throughout the world. It will be welcomed by political and social scientists with an interest in Central and Eastern Europe, and academics and students with an interest in environmental politics.

Federative Republic of Brazil A Consensualist Democracy or not

Studienarbeit aus dem Jahr 2009 im Fachbereich Politik - Internationale Politik - Region: Mittel- und Südamerika, Note: 1,3, Universität Konstanz (Fachbereich Politik und- Verwaltungswissenschhaft), Veranstaltung: Politische Systeme und ...

Federative Republic of Brazil   A Consensualist Democracy or not

Studienarbeit aus dem Jahr 2009 im Fachbereich Politik - Internationale Politik - Region: Mittel- und Sudamerika, Note: 1,3, Universitat Konstanz (Fachbereich Politik und- Verwaltungswissenschhaft), Veranstaltung: Politische Systeme und offentliche Politik in Lateinamerika im Vergleich, Sprache: Deutsch, Abstract: I would like in this Hausarbeit to demonstrate, with a background from Arend Lijpharts arguments, stated in the book Patterns of Democracy. Government Forms and Performance in Thirty-Six Countries," if Brazil it is or not a consensualist democracy. Arend Lijphart considers that each system of government can receive one of the next attributes: majoritarian or consensualist. He gives ten opposite criteria, on two dimensions, on which can extend the two types of democracy (majoriatrian and consensualist). I intend to make a logical digest, searching each of this criterion on Brazils case. At the end, after considering all ten criteria, I will be able to say if Federative Republic of Brazil its a consensualist democracy or not."

From Republic to Democracy

Therefore, this is the form of government which power is exercised by the people; the one worthy being called Democracy.

From Republic to Democracy

Political philosophy in a smooth historical narrative drawing the traces of the participatory political systems, leaving in the hands of each reader the responsibility to share power. Republic - a vague word - culturally is synonymous with representative democracy. If not configured as a dictatorship in disguise, is far from a true democracy. Currently, there are favorable conditions for all citizens participate sharing the power administering various aspects of society. The transition must be nice and easy while the people get the empowerment for self-management in a direct democracy. Direct Democracy is the form of government which voters can vote not only on their representatives' to do what they want during their term in office. The laws go to plebiscite or referendum for popular agreement. Public budgets are also participatory; and all subjects from the cities to the federations, using the Internet and other current technologies such as Government 2.0 applications (AutoGov) and local assemblies with open participation, electing committees and other mechanisms of popular participation, so people can organize and decide together, turning their discussions into actions/solutions. Therefore, this is the form of government which power is exercised by the people; the one worthy being called Democracy. Original title: 'Da República à Democracia, Um Ensaio Conceitual para a Democracia Direta', published by www.editoramultifoco.com.br, in Portuguese, Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, 2014. Also available: From Republic to Democracy Vol. 2 Applied Economics for Direct Democracy https://www.createspace.com/5815119

A Republic No More

After the Constitutional Convention, Benjamin Franklin was asked, “Well, Doctor, what have we got—a Republic or a Monarchy?” Franklin’s response: “A Republic—if you can keep it.” This book argues: we couldn’t keep it.

A Republic No More

After the Constitutional Convention, Benjamin Franklin was asked, “Well, Doctor, what have we got—a Republic or a Monarchy?” Franklin’s response: “A Republic—if you can keep it.” This book argues: we couldn’t keep it. A true republic privileges the common interest above the special interests. To do this, our Constitution established an elaborate system of checks and balances that disperses power among the branches of government, which it places in conflict with one another. The Framers believed that this would keep grasping, covetous factions from acquiring enough power to dominate government. Instead, only the people would rule. Proper institutional design is essential to this system. Each branch must manage responsibly the powers it is granted, as well as rebuke the other branches when they go astray. This is where subsequent generations have run into trouble: we have overloaded our government with more power than it can handle. The Constitution’s checks and balances have broken down because the institutions created in 1787 cannot exercise responsibly the powers of our sprawling, immense twenty-first-century government. The result is the triumph of special interests over the common interest. James Madison called this factionalism. We know it as political corruption. Corruption today is so widespread that our government is not really a republic, but rather a special interest democracy. Everybody may participate, yes, but the contours of public policy depend not so much on the common good, as on the push-and-pull of the various interest groups encamped in Washington, DC.

Alejandro Lerroux and the Failure of Spanish Republican Democracy

This book is the first scholarly biography in any language of this titan of modern Spanish politics.

Alejandro Lerroux and the Failure of Spanish Republican Democracy

Alejandro Lerroux (1864-1949) was one of the most polemical figures of early twentieth century Spanish politics. As leader of the Radical Republican Party and six-time prime minister between 1933 and 1935, his admirers saw him as a patriot determined to create a Republic for all citizens, while his critics denounced him as an opportunistic demagogue willing to sacrifice the Republic to its enemies. Like his French republican contemporary Georges Clemenceau, Lerroux's long political journey took him from the fiery radical leftism of his youth to centrist consensual politics. Thus while Lerroux was the most significant advocate of a revolutionary break with Spain's monarchical and authoritarian past before 1931, after the proclamation of the Second Republic he wished to build an inclusive and tolerant democracy. This book is the first scholarly biography in any language of this titan of modern Spanish politics. Nigel Townson's The Crisis of Democracy in Spain (2000) is the only book in English to discuss Lerroux's career in any detail, but his study is restricted to the Second Republic. Utilising neglected primary material, Villa Garcia argues that Lerroux embodies the transition from the elitist liberal politics of the nineteenth century to the modern mass politics of the twentieth. Like the Second Republic itself, Lerroux's political career ended in failure. The work is a timely reminder to students of modern Spain that the demise of Republican democracy was not inevitable. Nevertheless, after the abrupt end to Lerroux's effort to sustain a broadly based moderate and democratic government, Spain would never again achieve stable and constitutional rule until 1977. The political defeat of Lerroux was a major turning point in the country's history, a fateful step in the failure of democracy and the coming of civil war.

The Republic

Many conservatives still insist that it is only a republic, not a democracy. Democrats insist that it is a democracy, or a democratic republic. But there is no official warrant for either usage. MRS. SMYTH: Well, I am surprised to hear ...

The Republic

In more than 230 years of statehood, the United States has created its own distinctive way of living and governing--a way which its citizens cherish, but about whose essence, for want of definition, they frequently disagree. Charles Beard offered, in a synthesis of his life work, a permanent statement on the nature of the American Republic. To carry out his purpose, Beard discusses, among other subjects, the making of one nation out of many peoples and nationalities, the letter and the spirit of the Constitution, the rights and liberties of citizens, the theory of checks and balances, the role of political parties, the Republic in the world of nations, and the coming fate and fortune of America. Above all, he deals philosophically with the eternal conflict between power and freedom, security and liberty. In form, the book is a series of conversations among friends. The author and two public-spirited citizens carry the main burden of the discourse, and other figures are introduced to present special but prevailing points of view. In this way the reader not only feels that he is participating in a search for the truth, but discovers that his own point of view has here an able sponsor. Beard has taken a theme of majestic scope and presented it in terms that are warm and human and immediately relevant.

Democracy in America

Tocqueville examines the structures, institution and operation of democracy, and analyzes the lessons that Europe could learn from American successes and failures.

Democracy in America

Tocqueville examines the structures, institution and operation of democracy, and analyzes the lessons that Europe could learn from American successes and failures. It continues to be an influential text on both sides of the Atlantic, especially in the emerging democracies of Eastern Europe.

From Classical to Modern Republicanism

It says much, however, about how limited was the appeal of pro-republic, antidemocracy rhetoric that the rabidly nativist Lodge always applauded “true democracyrather than republicanism. “Let us lay aside first the word republic for a ...

From Classical to Modern Republicanism

In 1955 Louis Hartz published a volume titled The Liberal Tradition in America, in which he argued that liberalism was the one and only American tradition. Since then scholars of New Left and neoconservative persuasion have offered an alternative account based on the notion that the civic notions of antiquity continued to dominate political thought in modern times. Against this revisionist view the argument of From Classical to Modern Liberalism is that we need to study America in comparative perspective, and if we do so we shall discover that republicanism in the modern world was distinctively modern, drawing upon ideas of natural rights, consent, and social contract. Rather than a struggle between liberalism and republicanism, we should speak about liberal republicanism. Rather than republicanism versus liberalism, we should address liberalism versus illiberalism, the true issue of our age.

Constitutional Democracy in Crisis

Bringing together leading scholars to engage critically with the crises facing constitutional democracies in the 21st century, these essays diagnose the causes of the present afflictions in regimes, regions, and across the globe, believing ...

Constitutional Democracy in Crisis

Is the world facing a serious threat to the protection of constitutional democracy? There is a genuine debate about the meaning of the various political events that have, for many scholars and observers, generated a feeling of deep foreboding about our collective futures all over the world. Do these events represent simply the normal ebb and flow of political possibilities, or do they instead portend a more permanent move away from constitutional democracy that had been thought triumphant after the demise of the Soviet Union in 1989? Constitutional Democracy in Crisis? addresses these questions head-on: Are the forces weakening constitutional democracy around the world general or nation-specific? Why have some major democracies seemingly not experienced these problems? How can we as scholars and citizens think clearly about the ideas of "constitutional crisis" or "constitutional degeneration"? What are the impacts of forces such as globalization, immigration, income inequality, populism, nationalism, religious sectarianism? Bringing together leading scholars to engage critically with the crises facing constitutional democracies in the 21st century, these essays diagnose the causes of the present afflictions in regimes, regions, and across the globe, believing at this stage that diagnosis is of central importance - as Abraham Lincoln said in his "House Divided" speech, "If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could then better judge what to do, and how to do it."

Congressional Record

COMPROMISE WITH JUSTICE Not DEMOCRACY fault . ... And government known as a Republic . all the legal ropes . to top this ... As the Communist party organizes openly , convenience to the law enforcement buSo is a republic .

Congressional Record

The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. It is published daily when Congress is in session. The Congressional Record began publication in 1873. Debates for sessions prior to 1873 are recorded in The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States (1789-1824), the Register of Debates in Congress (1824-1837), and the Congressional Globe (1833-1873)

A Different Democracy

Later on in this chapter, we will discuss some cases in which established democracies did change their electoral ... It is sometimes stated that the United States is a republic and not a democracy, and often The Federalist Papers are ...

A Different Democracy

"Four distinguished scholars in political science analyze American democracy from a comparative point of view, exploring how the U.S. political system differs from that of thirty other democracies and what those differences ultimately mean for democratic performance. This essential text approaches the following institutions from a political engineering point of view: constitutions, electoral systems, and political parties, as well as legislative, executive, and judicial power. The text looks at democracies from around the world over a two-decade time frame. The result is not only a fresh view of the much-discussed theme of American exceptionalism but also an innovative approach to comparative politics that treats the United States as but one case among many. An ideal textbook for both American and comparative politics courses"--