Restorative Justice Self interest and Responsible Citizenship

This book develops Lode Walgrave's conception of restorative justice further, incorporating a number of key elements. • a clearly outcome-based definition of restorative justice • acceptance of the need to use judicial coercion to ...

Restorative Justice  Self interest and Responsible Citizenship

Lode Walgrave has made a highly significant contribution to the worldwide development of the restorative justice movement over the last two decades. This book represents the culmination of his vision for restorative justice. Coming to the subject from a juvenile justice background he initially saw restorative justice as a means of escaping the rehabilitation-punishment dilemma, and as the basis for a more constructive judicial response to youth crime that had been the case hitherto. Over time his conception of restorative justice moved in the direction of focusing on repairing harm and suffering rather than ensuring that the youthful offender met with a 'just' response, and encompassing the notion that restorative justice was not so much about a justice system promoting restoration, more a matter of doing justice through restoration. This book develops Lode Walgrave's conception of restorative justice further, incorporating a number of key elements. • a clearly outcome-based definition of restorative justice • acceptance of the need to use judicial coercion to impose sanctions as part of the reparative process • presenting restorative justice as a fully fledged alternative to the punitive apriorism • development of a more sophisticated concept of the relationship between restorative justice and the law, and acceptance of the need for legal regulation • a consideration of the expansion of a restorative justice philosophy into other areas of social life and the threats and opportunities this provides • a consideration of the implications of the expansion of restorative justice for the discipline of criminology and democracy

Critical Restorative Justice

(2002b) Restorative Justice and the Law (Cullompton, Willan Publishing). —— (
2006) Restorative Justice, Self-interest and Responsible Citizenship (Cullompton
, Willan Publishing). —— (2007) 'Integrating Criminal Justice and Restorative ...

Critical Restorative Justice

Theories and practices of justice do not meet the socio-political challenges of our times. For those theorists attempting to develop an alternative to the criminal justice system, restorative justice has provided an alternative horizon. The restorative justice approach involves meeting people, understanding and recognising their vulnerability through participatory and deliberative forums and practices. The aim of this collection is to bridge the distance between restorative justice and the critical theory tradition. It, on the one hand, takes into account the limits of restorative justice as they have been articulated, or can be articulated through critical social theory, and on the other hand emphasises the ground-breaking potential that restorative justice can bring to this tradition as a way to address crimes, conflicts and injustices, and to pursue justice.

Restorative Practice Meets Social Justice

Sergiovanni, T.J. (1994). Building community in schools. San Francisco, CA:
Jossey-Bass. Walgrave, L. (2013). Restorative justice, self-interest responsible
citizenship. New York, NY: NY. Willan. Weitekamp, E. G., & Kerner, H. J. (Eds.). (
2012).

Restorative Practice Meets Social Justice

Restorative Practice Meets Social Justice: Unsilencing the Voices of “AtPromise” Student Populations is a collection of pragmatic urban school experiences that focus on restorative approaches situated in the context of social justice. By adopting this approach, researchers and practitioners can connect and extend longestablished lines of conceptual and empirical inquiry aimed at improving school practices and thereby gain insights that may otherwise be overlooked or assumed. This holds great promise for generating, refining, and testing theories of restorative practices in educational leadership and will help strengthen already vibrant lines of inquiry on social justice. The authors posit that a broader conceptualization of social and restorative justice adds to extant discourse about students who not only experience various types of daily oppression in US schools but also regularly live on the fringes of society. Chapters are written by a combination of researchers and practicing school leaders who believe in the power of healing and restoring relationships within school communities as opposed to traditional punitive structures. The dynamic approaches discussed throughout the book urge school leaders, teachers, school community members, and those who prepare administrators to look within and build bridges between themselves and the communities in which they serve.

The Handbook of Community Practice

Restorative justice: The evidence. London: Smith ... Second chances: Youth
justice coordinators' perspectives on the youth justice Family Group Conference
process. ... Restorative justice, self-interest and responsible citizenship. Portland,
OR: ...

The Handbook of Community Practice

The Second Edition of The Handbook of Community Practice is expanded and updated with a major global focus and serves as a comprehensive guidebook of community practice grounded in social justice and human rights. It utilizes community and practice theories and encompasses community development, organizing, planning, social change, policy practice, program development, service coordination, organizational cultural competency, and community-based research in relation to global poverty and community empowerment. This is also the first community practice text to provide combined and in-depth treatment of globalization and international development practice issues—including impacts on communities in the United States and on international development work. The Handbook is grounded in participatory and empowerment practices, including social change, social and economic development, feminist practice, community-collaborative, and engagement in diverse communities. It utilizes the social development perspective and employs analyses of persistent poverty, asset development, policy practice, and community research approaches as well as providing strategies for advocacy and social and legislative action. The handbook consists of forty chapters which challenge readers to examine and assess practice, theory, and research methods. As it expands on models and approaches, delineates emerging issues, and connects policy and practice, the book provides vision and strategies for local to global community practice in the coming decades. The handbook will continue to stand as the central text and reference for comprehensive community practice, and will be useful for years to come as it emphasizes direction for positive change, new developments in community approaches, and focuses attention on globalization, human rights, and social justice. It will continue to be used as a core text for multiple courses within programs, will have long term application for students of community practice, and will provide practitioners with new grounding for development, planning, organizing, and empowerment and social change work.

2010

2010

Reviews are an important aspect of scholarly discussion because they help filter out which works are relevant in the yearly flood of publications and are thus influential in determining how a work is received. The IBR, published again since 1971 as an interdisciplinary, international bibliography of reviews, it is a unique source of bibliographical information. The database contains entries on over 1.2 million book reviews of literature dealing primarily with the humanities and social sciences published in 6,820, mainly European scholarly journals. Reviews of more than 560,000 scholarly works are listed. The database increases every year by 60,000 entries. Every entry contains the following information: On the work reviewed: author, title On the review: reviewer, periodical (year, edition, page, ISSN), language, subject area (in German, English, Italian) Publisher, address of journal

Choice

Restorative justice , self - interest and responsible citizenship . Willan , 2008 .
240p bibl index ISBN ... 95 ; ISBN 9781843923343 pbk , $ 45 . 00 In this brilliant
book , Walgrave ' s first aim is to clarify what is meant by “ restorative justice .

Choice


Restorative Justice and Criminal Justice

Restorative justice extends the offender's responsibility to ' active responsibility ' (
Braithwaite and Roche , 2001 ) , including the obligation ... The victim is
encouraged , but not obliged , to assume the general citizens ' responsibility for
trying to find solutions , which promote peace . ... But also in free processes and
agreements , respect and solidarity may be overruled by selfinterest and abuse of
power .

Restorative Justice and Criminal Justice

This volume provides an analytic exploration of Restorative Justice and its potential advantages and disadvantages.

Justice Morality and Social Responsibility

This volume of Research in Social Issues in Management critically examines theoretical underpinnings of organizational justice and corporate social responsibility by identifying motives underlying desires for justice and by considering ...

Justice  Morality  and Social Responsibility

This volume of Research in Social Issues in Management critically examines theoretical underpinnings of organizational justice and corporate social responsibility by identifying motives underlying desires for justice and by considering responses to injustice. The first set of chapters explores issues of morality, emotions, and social exchange relationships. These can be seen as engines that drive reactions to organizational justice. The second set of chapters addresses injustice and recovery, the social systems surrounding justice, and the application of justice principles to organizations’ environmental and sustainability practices. A commentary chapter highlights ten themes that cross this interesting collection of paper on Justice, Morality, and Social Responsibility.

A Restorative Justice Reader

It is now recognized as part of the state ' s responsibility for criminal justice that it
should provide a compensation fund ... The victim ' s interest is as a citizen , as
one of many citizens who make up the community or state . ... undertake the duty
of administering justice and protecting citizens in return for citizens giving up their
right to self - help ( except in cases of urgency ) in the cause of better social order
.

A Restorative Justice Reader

"A fine book. Cogently argued and nuanced, a serious contribution to thinking on restorative justice…"John Braithwaite One of the most important developments in crime and its control over recent years has been the emergence of a dynamic campaign promoting restorative justice as an alternative to standard ways of responding to crime, i.e. legal prosecution and state punishment. Accompanying this has been a rapidly growing literature on the subject, from the UK, North America, Australasia and elsewhere. The main aim of this book is to bring together a selection of extracts from the most important and influential contributions to the restorative justice literature and its emergent philosophy, accompanying these with an informative commentary providing context and explanation where necessary. The book includes by both well known proponents of restorative justice, work by some of the key critics of the restorative justice movement, along with work from a number of writers not directly involved in either advocacy or critique of restorative justice, but whose work is crucial to an understanding of it. The book is organised into five main sections: the concept of restorative justice historical, anthropological and theological roots of restorative justice the goals ­ restoring victims and offenders and preventing crime the restorative process critical perspectives The book provides a unique sourcebook, bringing together writings from a wide range of often inaccessible sources ­ essential reading both for students taking courses in criminal justice/restorative justice as well as practitioners involved in the administration of criminal justice who need an understanding of what restorative justice is about and how it has developed.

Restorative Justice

In modern industrial societies citizens have tended to delegate responsibility as
far as most personal questions are ... the ability to deal with their differences and
conflicts as a result of the trend toward individualization and isolation of interests .

Restorative Justice

This edited collection considers the theory, research and practice of restorative justice in Australia, New Zealand, the US, Canada, England and Wales, Japan and Germany. There is also one section dedicated to restorative justice practice among Indigenous peoples.

Learning the Common Good

... of Community-based Moral Education in the Theory and Practice of Restorative
Justice Francis Joseph Schweigert. recall Tocqueville's observation that
involvement “in the civic associations of a small town transform self-interested
motives into public ... life of the modern metropolis does not generate the kinds of
second languages of social responsibility and practices of ... The second model,
the concerned citizen, is motivated by threats to personal or community self-
interest, tied to ...

Learning the Common Good


Innovative Justice

In the interests of avoiding the potential for such paradoxical harms, notions of
generativity and reciprocity– ... Justiceand supportingdesistance and
reintegrationare as muchsocial projects (thatis,we are allresponsible) as they
arepersonal ones (thatis, each individual is responsible) ... Responsible
citizenshipis built uponafoundation of reciprocaland restorativepractices that
implicateall (Walgrave, 2008).

Innovative Justice

This book showcases innovative justice initiatives from around the world which engage offenders, practitioners and communities to reduce reoffending and support desistance and positive change. It is groundbreaking in bringing together inspiring ideas and pioneering practices to analyse how ‘justice done differently’ is making a difference. The voices and experiences of the people at the forefront of these innovative initiatives are presented throughout the book, including offenders, corrections staff and directors, the judiciary, scientists and academics, volunteers and community organisations. Strengths-based research methods are used to investigate and celebrate best practices and ‘good news stories’ from the field. The authors raise critical questions about what is considered innovative and effective, for whom and in what context, presenting their own conceptual approach for analysing innovation. With initiatives drawn from diverse jurisdictions and cultures – including the UK, Europe, Australia, Asia, the US and South America – this book showcases original ideas and refreshing developments that have the potential to transform rehabilitation and reintegration practices. The book’s substance and style will resonate with practitioners, students and academics across the interdisciplinary fields of criminology and criminal justice.

Journal of Legal Pluralism and Unofficial Law

This feeling of second - class citizenship is particularly felt by the police officers at
Navajo . “ The second form of justice , the original form developed by indigenous
peoples , is restorative justice ” ( Zion 1997 ) . ... Social control in terms of
authority was deemed necessary to protect society against rampant individual
self - interest , and thus ... power is fundamentally different from the Native
American concept of sovereignty or responsible and egalitarian governance (
social control ) .

Journal of Legal Pluralism and Unofficial Law


Ethics

... 444 ; on idealism , 708 ; on justice , 801 ; on self - interest , 1334 ; on
underworld , 968 Republican Party and conservatism , 317 ... conservation of ,
316 ; and deforestation , 362 - 363 ; and distributive justice , 392 - 393
Responsibility , 1264 - 1268 ... See also Accountability Restoration of Religious
Freedom Act of 1993 , 874 Restorative justice and victims ' rights ... and business
ethics , 182 ; and citizenship , 247 ; and corruption , 331 Riis , Jacob , 513 Rinzai
Zen , 402 , 1611 Robb ...

Ethics

Applied ethics is the main focus of this revised edition, with a particular emphasis on current ethics issues. Includes religious issues, business and labor ethics, political and economic issues, personal and social ethics issues, and bioethics.

The Responsive Community

Privatization will undercut constitutional guarantees of due process , either
because private citizens will “ take the law into their ... but each would rather have
others supply it ( through taxation or privately ) and , so , this pursuit of self -
interest will prevent ... of the justice process , and this is wholly consistent with
emerging community justice and restorative justice philosophies . Criminal
accountability becomes defined by the responsibility of offenders to make
restitution to their victims .

The Responsive Community


Parliamentary Debates House of Lords

We have left ourselves too little time to allow relevant interests to be involved and
to hear different voices and voices closer to our various communities . ... As
someone who made his own maiden speech more recently than most in this
Chamber , I think that I can probably ... First , civil society has , over time , been
responsible for many important social policy innovations . I think of restorative
justice as an important current example , At a time when we need innovative
thinking perhaps ...

Parliamentary Debates  House of Lords


Making Amends

Various responses to these objections are open to the restorative justice theorist.
... For one thing, given the strength of offenders' interests in avoiding
imprisonment and victims' interests in receiving some ... Second, especially with
regard to the sexual assault example, we see the danger of making the parties
themselves responsible for defending their own rights. ... are in place, restorative
justice systems put offenders in the position of being morally educated by other
private citizens ...

Making Amends

Can wrongs be righted? Can we make up for our misdeeds, or does the impossibility of changing the past mean that we remain permanently guilty? While atonement is traditionally considered a theological topic, Making Amends uses the resources of secular moral philosophy to explore the possibility of correcting the wrongs we do to one another. Philosophers generally approach the problem of past wrongdoing from the point of view of either a judge or a victim. They assume that wrongdoing can only be resolved through punishment or forgiveness. But this book explores the responses that wrongdoers can and should make to their own misdeeds, responses such as apology, repentance, reparations, and self-punishment. Making Amends explores the possibility of atonement in a broad spectrum of contexts--from cases of relatively minor wrongs in personal relationships, to crimes, to the historical injustices of our political and religious communities. It argues that wrongdoers often have the ability to earn redemption within the moral community. Making Amends defends a theory of atonement that emphasizes the rebuilding of respect and trust among victims, communities and wrongdoers. The ideal of reconciliation enables us to explain the value of repentance without restricting our interest to the wrongdoer's character, to account for the power of reparations without placing a dollar value on dignity, to justify the suffering of guilt without falling into a simplistic endorsement of retribution, and to insist on the moral responsibility of wrongdoing groups without treating their members unfairly.

My Name is Today

Concerning legislation on alternatives , two tendencies can be The Maori elders
work with criminal justice agencies to identify observed . ... On the one hand we
want to prevent re - offending and by enumerating them in an non - exhaustive
way . and protect citizens . ... can try several programmes and several own
interest as well as in the interest of society . ... offered by traditional young
offender can accept responsibility for his / her behaviour practices , without
infringing the law .

My Name is Today