Resurrecting Jesus

Embodying the Spirit of a Revolutionary Mystic

Resurrecting Jesus

For almost two millennia, the story of Jesus has shaped the lives of countless people. Yet today, even though the majority of us grew up in a culture suffused by the mythos of Jesus, many of us feel disconnected from the essence of his teachings. With Resurrecting Jesus, Adyashanti invites us to rediscover the life and words of Jesus as a direct path to the most radical of transformations: spiritual awakening. Jesus crossed all of the boundaries that separated the people of his time because he viewed the world from the perspective of what unites us, not what divides us. In Resurrecting Jesus, Adya embarks on a fascinating reconsideration of the man known as Jesus, examining his life from birth to Resurrection to reveal a timeless model of awakening and enlightened engagement with the world. Through close consideration of the archetypal figures and events of the Gospels, Adya issues a call to “live the Christ” in a way that is unique to each of us. “When the eternal and the human meet,” writes Adya, “that’s where love is born—not through escaping our humanity or trying to disappear into transcendence, but through finding that place where they come into union.” Resurrecting Jesus is a book for realizing this union in your own life, with heart and mind wide open to the mystery inside us all. With an all-new foreword by Episcopalian priest and scholar Cynthia Bourgeault.

Resurrecting Jesus

The Earliest Christian Tradition and Its Interpreters

Resurrecting Jesus

Jesus remains a popular figure in contemporary culture and Allison remains one of our best interpreters. He speaks around the country in a variety of venues on matters related to the study of the Historical Jesus. In his new book, he focuses on the historical Jesus and eschatology, concluding that the Jesus was not a Hellenistic wonder worker or teacher of pious morality but an apocalyptic prophet. In an opening chapter that is worth the price of admission, Allison astutely and engagingly captures the history of the search for the historical Jesus. He observes that many contemporary readings of Jesus shift the focus away from traditional theological, Christological, and eschatological concerns. In provocative fashion, He takes on not only the Jesus Seminar but also other Jesus interpreters such as N.T. Wright and Marcus Borg.

Resurrecting Jesus

The Renewal of New Testament Theology

Resurrecting Jesus

Jesus cannot be domesticated! In Resurrecting Jesus Kim asks the fundamental two-prong question, "What, then, can we learn from Jesus, and how can we build on the significance of his life and work as we do theology for our day in the here and now?" Kim abandons the traditional divide between criticism and theology and argues that a solid New Testament theology can be reconstructed from a critical study of the historical Jesus. Jesus is put back into the context of first-century Judaism in Palestine. Resurrecting Jesus reexamines Jesus' life, work, death, and resurrection, giving readers - a better, clearer understanding about the historical Jesus and the New Testament writings that refer to him; - an exploration into the significance of Jesus' life, teaching, and death, based not on doctrine but on his work of God in first-century Judaism and Palestine; and - a redefinition of New Testament theology that is a process of discerning and engaging the historical Jesus and the New Testament writings.

Resurrecting Jesus

An Indictment of Creedal Christianity

Resurrecting Jesus

This work demonstrates that the core teachings of the major denominations of Christianity such as the Trinity and the Miraculous Incarnation are not based on either the Hebrew Scriptures or the New Testament but rather are drawn from the Hellenist-Latin theologies and philosophies of the Church Fathers as expressed in the Christian Creeds formulated and formalised through the medium of the Ecumenical Councils convened between the years 325 AD and 451 AD. This work also demonstrates that the Christian teaching of Supersessionism was one of the major contributing factors behind the centuries of Jewish persecution which ultimately led to the Holocaust.

Resurrecting Jesus from DNA

Resurrecting Jesus from DNA

Author X boldly presents a story of a group of new age scientists that has found a way to use DNA and cutting-edge technology to resurrect Jesus Christ, or at least somebody similar. Only one man (Dr. Samuel John) who is the voice of reason for the entire world will have to decide if he should or shouldn't help make this a reality. Is this real life or is it fantasy? How will Christians react? How will the world react? How will you react when the Only Begotten Son has returned?

Resurrecting the Brother of Jesus

The James Ossuary Controversy and the Quest for Religious Relics

Resurrecting the Brother of Jesus

In 2002 a burial box of skeletal remains purchased anonymously from the black market was identified as the ossuary of James, the brother of Jesus. Transformed by the media into a religious and historical relic overnight, the artifact made its way to the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, where 100,000 people congregated to experience what had been prematurely and hyperbolically billed as the closest tactile connection to Jesus yet unearthed. Within a few months, however, the ossuary was revealed to be a forgery. Resurrecting the Brother of Jesus offers a critical evaluation of the popular and scholarly reception of the James Ossuary as it emerged from the dimness of the antiquities black market to become a Protestant relic in the media's custody. The volume brings together experts in Jewish archaeology, early Christianity, American religious history, and pilgrimage to explore the theory and practice couched in the debate about the object's authenticity. Contributors explore the ways in which the varying popular and scholarly responses to the ossuary phenomenon inform the presumption of religious meaning; how religious categories are created, vetted, and used for various purposes; and whether the history of pious frauds in America can help to illuminate this international episode. Resurrecting the Brother of Jesus also contributes to discussions about the construction of religious studies as an academic discipline and the role of scholars as public interpreters of discoveries with religious significance. Contributors: Thomas S. Bremer, Rhodes College Ryan Byrne, Menifee, California Byron R. McCane, Wofford College Bernadette McNary-Zak, Rhodes College Milton Moreland, Rhodes College Jonathan L. Reed, University of La Verne

Resurrecting the Brother of Jesus (Large Print 16pt)

Resurrecting the Brother of Jesus (Large Print 16pt)

In 2002 a burial box of skeletal remains purchased anonymously from the black market was identified as the ossuary of James, the brother of Jesus. Transformed by the media into a religious and historical relic overnight, the artifact made its way to the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, where 100,000 people congregated to experience what had been prematurely and hyperbolically billed as the closest tactile connection to Jesus yet unearthed. Within a few months, however, the ossuary was revealed to be a forgery. Resurrecting the Brother of Jesus offers a critical evaluation of the popular and scholarly reception of the James Ossuary as it emerged from the dimness of the antiquities black market to become a Protestant relic in the medias custody. The volume brings together experts in Jewish archaeology, early Christianity, American religious history, and pilgrimage to explore the theory and practice couched in the debate about the objects authenticity. Contributors explore the ways in which the varying popular and scholarly responses to the ossuary phenomenon inform the presumption of religious meaning; how religious categories are created, vetted, and used for various purposes; and whether the history of pious frauds in America can help to illuminate this international episode. Resurrecting the Brother of Jesus also contributes to discussions about the construction of religious studies as an academic discipline and the role of scholars as public interpreters of discoveries with religious significance. Contributors: Thomas S. Bremer, Rhodes College Ryan Byrne, Menifee, California Byron R. McCane, Wofford College, Bernadette McNary-Zak, Rhodes College, Milton Moreland, Rhodes College, Jonathan L. Reed, University of La Verne.