Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study

In part, the rejection of source study was based on the notion that its frequent or traditional goal was to find what material Shakespeare used so as to portray Shakespeare's unique genius.12 As various essays in this collection show, ...

Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study

This book asks new questions about how and why Shakespeare engages with source material, and about what should be counted as sources in Shakespeare studies. The essays demonstrate that source study remains an indispensable mode of inquiry for understanding Shakespeare, his authorship and audiences, and early modern gender, racial, and class relations, as well as for considering how new technologies have and will continue to redefine our understanding of the materials Shakespeare used to compose his plays. Although source study has been used in the past to construct a conservative view of Shakespeare and his genius, the volume argues that a rethought Shakespearean source study provides opportunities to examine models and practices of cultural exchange and memory, and to value specific cultures and difference. Informed by contemporary approaches to literature and culture, the essays revise conceptions of sources and intertextuality to include terms like "haunting," "sustainability," "microscopic sources," "contamination," "fragmentary circulation" and "cultural conservation." They maintain an awareness of the heterogeneity of cultures along lines of class, religious affiliation, and race, seeking to enhance the opportunity to register diverse ideas and frameworks imported from foreign material and distant sources. The volume not only examines print culture, but also material culture, theatrical paradigms, generic assumptions, and oral narratives. It considers how digital technologies alter how we find sources and see connections among texts. This book asserts that how critics assess and acknowledge Shakespeare’s sources remains interpretively and politically significant; source study and its legacy continues to shape the image of Shakespeare and his authorship. The collection will be valuable to those interested in the relationships between Shakespeare’s work and other texts, those seeking to understand how the legacy of source study has shaped Shakespeare as a cultural phenomenon, and those studying source study, early modern authorship, implications of digital tools in early modern studies, and early modern literary culture.

Rethinking Theatrical Documents in Shakespeare s England

See McInnis, 'Lost Plays and Source Study', in Dennis Austin Britton and Melissa Walter, eds, Rethinking Shakespearean Source Study (London: Routledge, 2018), 304–307, for a discussion of the parallels. Charles J. Sisson, 'Shakespeare ...

Rethinking Theatrical Documents in Shakespeare   s England

Rethinking Theatrical Documents brings together fifteen major scholars to analyse and theorise the documents, lost and found, that produced a play in Shakespeare's England. Showing how the playhouse frantically generated paratexts, it explores a rich variety of entangled documents, some known and some unknown: from before the play (drafts, casting lists, actors' parts); during the play (prologues, epilogues, title-boards); and after the play (playbooks, commonplace snippets, ballads) – though 'before', 'during' and 'after' intertwine in fascinating ways. By using collective intervention to rethink both theatre history and book history, it provides new ways of understanding plays critically, interpretatively, editorially, practically and textually.

Shakespeare s Political Imagination

10 Lorna Hutson, Circumstantial Shakespeare (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015), 1–5. 11 Dennis Austin Britton and Melissa Walter, 'Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study', in Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study: Audiences, Authors, ...

Shakespeare s Political Imagination

Shakespeare's Political Imagination argues that to better understand Shakespeare's plays it is essential to look at the historicism of setting: how the places and societies depicted in the plays were understood in the period when they were written. This book offers us new readings of neglected critical moments in key plays, such as Malcolm's final speech in Macbeth and the Duke's inaction in The Merchant of Venice, by investigating early modern views about each setting and demonstrating how the plays navigate between those contemporary perspectives. Divided into three parts, this book explores Shakespeare's historicist use of medieval Britain and Scotland in King John and Macbeth; ancient Rome in Julius Caesar and Coriolanus; and Renaissance Europe through Venice and Vienna in The Merchant of Venice, Othello and Measure for Measure. Philip Goldfarb Styrt argues that settings are a powerful component in Shakespeare's worlds that not only function as physical locations, but are a mechanism through which he communicates the political and social orders of the plays. Reading the plays in light of these social and political contexts reveals Shakespeare's dramatic method: how he used competing cultural narratives about other cultures to situate the action of his plays. These fresh insights encourage us to move away from overly localized or universalized readings of the plays and re-discover hidden moments and meanings that have long been obscured.

Loss and the Literary Culture of Shakespeare s Time

Invitations to rethink the relationship between sources and Shakespeare and “questions of literary transmission and theatrical production,” ... David McInnis, “Lost Plays and Source Study,” in Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study, eds.

Loss and the Literary Culture of Shakespeare   s Time

As early modernists with an interest in the literary culture of Shakespeare’s time, we work in a field that contains many significant losses: of texts, of contextual information, of other forms of cultural activity. No account of early modern literary culture is complete without acknowledgment of these lacunae, and although lost drama has become a topic of increasing interest in Shakespeare studies, it is important to recognize that loss is not restricted to play-texts alone. Loss and the Literary Culture of Shakespeare’s Time broadens the scope of the scholarly conversation about loss beyond drama and beyond London. It aims to develop further models and techniques for thinking about lost plays, but also of other kinds of lost early modern works, and even lost persons associated with literary and theatrical circles. Chapters examine textual corruption, oral preservation, quantitative analysis, translation, and experiments in “verbatim theater”, plus much more.

Shakespeare and the Mediterranean 1 Romeo and Juliet

“Shakespeare's Politically Ambitious Friar”. Shakespeare Studies 13: 47-58. Britton Dennis and Walter Melissa. 2018. “Rethinking Shakespearean Source Study”. In Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study: Audience, Authors and Digital ...

Shakespeare and the Mediterranean 1  Romeo and Juliet

The Mediterranean of Shakespeare’s dramas is a vast geopolitical space. Historically, it spans from the Trojan war to Greek mythology and the ancient Roman empire; geographically, from Venice and Sicily to Cyprus and Turkey, from Greece to Egypt, the Middle East and North Africa. But it is also the Mediterranean of Renaissance Italian cities and Romeo and Juliet is a beautiful example of how exotic frontiers for an English gaze may be replaced by closer yet different cultural Mediterranean frames. The volume offers studies on the circulation of the story of Romeo and Juliet and its ancient archetypes in early modern Europe, from Greece to Italy, France and Spain, as well as on contemporary receptions and performances of Shakespeare’s play in Sicily, the Balkans, Israel and Jordan.

The Arden Research Handbook of Contemporary Shakespeare Criticism

Craig, H. (2011), 'Shakespeare's Vocabulary: Myth and Reality', Shakespeare Quarterly, 62: 53–74. ... Greatley-Hirsch, B. and L. Johnson (2018), 'Shakespeare Source Study in the Age of Google: Revisiting Greenblatt's Elephants and ...

The Arden Research Handbook of Contemporary Shakespeare Criticism

The Arden Research Handbook of Contemporary Shakespeare Criticism is a wide-ranging, authoritative guide to research on critical approaches to Shakespeare by an international team of leading scholars. It contains chapters on 20 specific critical practices, each grounded in analysis of a Shakespeare play. These practices range from foundational approaches including character studies, close reading and genre studies, through those that emerged in the 1970s and 1980s that challenged the preconceptions on which traditional liberal humanism is based, including feminism, cultural materialism and new historicism. Perspectives drawn from postcolonial, queer studies and critical race studies, besides more recent critical practices including presentism, ecofeminism and cognitive ethology all receive detailed treatment. In addition to its coverage of distinct critical approaches, the handbook contains various sections that provide non-specialists with practical help: an A–Z glossary of key terms and concepts, a chronology of major publications and events, an introduction to resources for study of the field and a substantial annotated bibliography.

Oedipus at Colonus and King Lear Classical and Early Modern Intersections

Britton, Dennis Austin and Melissa Walter (eds) (2018), Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study. Audiences, Authors, and Digital Technologies, New York and London: Routledge. Bullough, Geoffrey (1973), Narrative and Dramatic Sources of ...

Oedipus at Colonus and King Lear  Classical and Early Modern Intersections

The story of King Lear seems to fill in the blank space separating the end of Oedipus Tyrannus and the beginning of Oedipus at Colonus. In both Oedipus at Colonus and the latter part of King Lear we are presented with an old man who was once a King and, following his expulsion from his kingdom on account of a crime or of an error, is turned into a ‘no-thing’. This happens in the time of the division of the kingdom, which is also the time of the genesis of intraspecific conflict and, consequently, of the end of the dynasty. This collection of essays offers a range of perspectives on the many common concerns of these two plays, from the relation between fathers and sons/daughters to madness and wisdom, from sinning and suffering to ‘being’ and ‘non-being’ in human and divine time. It also offers an overarching critical frame that interrogates questions of ‘source’ and ‘reception’, probing into the possible exchangeability of perspectives in a game of mirrors that challenges ideas of origin.

The Routledge Research Companion to Anglo Italian Renaissance Literature and Culture

56 G. Bradshaw, Misrepresentations: Shakespeare and the Materialists (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1993), p. 213. ... New critical perspectives to source study can be found in the anthology Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study: ...

The Routledge Research Companion to Anglo Italian Renaissance Literature and Culture

The aim of this Companion volume is to provide scholars and advanced graduate students with a comprehensive and authoritative state-of-the-art review of current research work on Anglo-Italian Renaissance studies. Written by a team of international scholars and experts in the field, the chapters are grouped into two large areas of influence and intertextuality, corresponding to the dual way in which early modern England looked upon the Italian world from the English perspective – Part 1: "Italian literature and culture" and Part 2: "Appropriations and ideologies". In the first part, prominent Italian authors, artists, and thinkers are examined as a direct source of inspiration, imitation, and divergence. The variegated English response to the cultural, ideological, and political implications of pervasive Italian intertextuality, in interrelated aspects of artistic and generic production, is dealt with in the second part. Constructed on the basis of a largely interdisciplinary approach, the volume offers an in-depth and wide-ranging treatment of the multifaceted ways in which Italy’s material world and its iconologies are represented, appropriated, and exploited in the literary and cultural domain of early modern England. For this reason, contributors were asked to write essays that not only reflect current thinking but also point to directions for future research and scholarship, while a purposefully conceived bibliography of primary and secondary sources and a detailed index round off the volume.

Shakespeare s Originality

See e.g. Stephen J. Lynch, Shakespearean Intertextuality: Studies in Selected Sources and Plays (Westport, Conn.; ... eds, Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study: Audiences, Authors, and Digital Technologies (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2017).

Shakespeare s Originality

This compact, engaging book puts Shakespeare's originality in historical context and looks at how he worked with his sources: the plays, poems, chronicles and romances on which his own plays are based.

Spanish Romance in the Battle for Global Supremacy

27. Dennis Britton and Melissa Walter, “Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study,” in Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study: Audiences, Authors, and Digital Technologies (New York: Routledge, 2018), 1–16 (4). 28. For instance, as Shakespeare's ...

Spanish Romance in the Battle for Global Supremacy

Did Spanish explorers really discover the sunken city of Atlantis or one of the lost tribes of Israel in Aztec México? Did classical writers foretell the discovery of America? Were faeries and Amazons hiding in Guiana, and where was the fabled golden city, El Dorado? Who was more powerful, Apollo or Diana, and which claimant nation, Spain or England, would win the game of empire? These were some of the questions English writers, historians, and polemicists asked through their engagement with Spanish romance. By exploring England’s fanatical consumption of these tales of love and arms as reflected in the works of Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, John Dryden, Ben Jonson, and Peter Heylyn, this book shows how the idea of English empire took root in and through literature, and how these circumstances primed the success of Miguel de Cervantes's Don Quixote of la Mancha in England.

Arden Shakespeare Third Series Complete Works

SHAKESPEARE'S. SOURCES. Bate, Jonathan, Shakespeare and Ovid , Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993 Britton, Dennis Austin, and Melissa Walter, eds, Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study: Audience, Authors, and Digital Technologies ...

Arden Shakespeare Third Series Complete Works

This new Complete Works marks the completion of the Arden Shakespeare Third Series and includes all of Shakespeare's plays, poems and sonnets, edited by leading international scholars. New to this edition are the 'apocryphal' plays, part-written by Shakespeare: Double Falsehood, Sir Thomas More and King Edward III. The anthology is unique in giving all three extant texts of Hamlet from Shakespeare's time: the first and second Quarto texts of 1603 and 1604-5, and the first Folio text of 1623. With a simple alphabetical arrangement the Complete Works are easy to navigate. The lengthy introductions and footnotes of the individual Third Series volumes have been removed to make way for a general introduction, short individual introductions to each text, a glossary and a bibliography instead, to ensure all works are accessible in one single volume. This handsome Complete Works is ideal for readers keen to explore Shakespeare's work and for anyone building their literary library.

Shakespeare s Language in Digital Media

Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study: Audiences, Authors, and Digital Technologies. Abingdon: Routledge. Brown, Susan, Patricia Clements, Isobel Grundy, Stan Ruecker, Jeffery Antoniuk, and Sharon Balazs. 2009. “Published Yet Never Done: ...

Shakespeare s Language in Digital Media

The authors of this book ask how digital research tools are changing the ways in which practicing editors historicize Shakespeare's language. Scholars now encounter, interpret, and disseminate Shakespeare's language through an increasing variety of digital resources, including online editions such as the Internet Shakespeare Editions (ISE), searchable lexical corpora such as the Early English Books Online-Text Creation Partnership (EEBO-TCP) or the Lexicons of Early Modern English (LEME) collections, high-quality digital facsimiles such as the Folger Shakespeare Library's Digital Image Collection, text visualization tools such as Voyant, apps for reading and editing on mobile devices, and more. What new insights do these tools offer about the ways Shakespeare's words made meaning in their own time? What kinds of historical or historicizing arguments can digital editions make about Shakespeare's language? A growing body of work in the digital humanities allows textual critics to explore new approaches to editing in digital environments, and enables language historians to ask and answer new questions about Shakespeare's words. The authors in this unique book explicitly bring together the two fields of textual criticism and language history in an exploration of the ways in which new tools are expanding our understanding of Early Modern English.

Telltale Women

In The Palgrave Handbook of Shakespeare's Queens, edited by Kavita Mudan Finn and Valerie Schutte, 183–202. Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018. ... a Sustainable Source Study.”In Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study: 314 Bibliography.

Telltale Women

In Telltale Women Allison Machlis Meyer challenges established perceptions of source study, historiography, and the staging of gender politics in well-known drama, arguing that narrative historiographers frequently value women’s political interventions and use narrative techniques to invest women’s voices with authority, while dramatists reshape this source material to create stage representations of royal women that condemn queenship and female power.

Shakespeare and Lost Plays

Rethinking Shakespearean Source Study (New York: belongs to the end of the play and resolves two. Routledge, 2018), 297–315, and is reproduced by permission of the publisher. 14 P. E. Bennett, 'The Oswald Fragment and “A Knack to Know a ...

Shakespeare and Lost Plays

Explores Shakespeare's plays in their most immediate context: the hundreds of plays known to original audiences, but lost to us.

Shakespeare and Senecan Tragedy

The Sources of Shakespeare's Plays. 1977; Abingdon: Routledge, 2005. ... “Coriolanus and the Little Eyases: The Boyhood of Shakespeare's Hero. ... In Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study: Audiences, Authors, and Digital Technologies.

Shakespeare and Senecan Tragedy

Shakespeare's tragic characters have often been seen as forerunners of modern personhood. It has been assumed that Shakespeare was able to invent such lifelike figures in part because of his freedom from the restrictions of classical form. Curtis Perry instead argues that characters such as Hamlet and King Lear have seemed modern to us in part because they are so robustly connected to the tradition of Senecan tragedy. Resituating Shakespearean tragedy in this way - as backward looking as well as forward looking - makes it possible to recover a crucial political dimension. Shakespeare saw Seneca as a representative voice from post-republican Rome: in plays such as Coriolanus and Othello he uses Senecan modes of characterization to explore questions of identity in relation to failures of republican community. This study has important implications for the way we understand character, community, and alterity in early modern drama.

Shakespeare and Digital Pedagogy

4 5 6 whether or not Shakespeare read this particular translation, another translation or the Spanish original, it is quite clear ... Britton, D. A. and M. Walter, eds (2017), Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study: Audiences, Authors, ...

Shakespeare and Digital Pedagogy

Shakespeare and Digital Pedagogy is an international collection of fresh digital approaches for teaching Shakespeare. It describes 15 methodologies, resources and tools recently developed, updated and used by a diverse range of contributors in Great Britain, Australia, Asia and the United States. Contributors explore how these digital resources meet classroom needs and help facilitate conversations about academic literacy, race and identity, local and global cultures, performance and interdisciplinary thought. Chapters describe each case study in depth, recounting needs, collaborations and challenges during design, as well as sharing effective classroom uses and offering accessible, usable content for both teachers and learners. The book will appeal to a broad range of readers. College and high school instructors will find a rich trove of usable teaching content and suggestions for mounting digital units in the classroom, while digital humanities and education specialists will find a snapshot of and theories about the field itself. With access to exciting new content from local archives and global networks, the collection aids teaching, research and reflection on Shakespeare for the 21st century.

Black Shakespeare

66 Urvashi Chakravarty, “The Renaissance of Race and the Future of Early Modern Race Studies,” Special Issue: The State ... Dennis Austin Britton and Melissa Walter, eds., Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study (New York: Routledge, 2018).

Black Shakespeare

In his compelling new book Ian Smith addresses the pernicious influence of systemic whiteness on our interpretation of Shakespeare's plays. Unmissable reading for students and scholars of drama, cultural and early modern studies.

Shakespeare Survey 75

7 Dennis Austin Britton, ʻContaminatio, race, and pity in Othelloʼ, in Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study: Audiences, Authors, and Digital Technologies, ed. Dennis Austin Britton and Melissa Walter (New York, 2018), pp. 46–64.

Shakespeare Survey 75

Shakespeare Survey is a yearbook of Shakespeare studies and production. Since 1948, Survey has published the best international scholarship in English and many of its essays have become classics of Shakespeare criticism. Each volume is devoted to a theme, or play, or group of plays; each also contains a section of reviews of that year's textual and critical studies and of the year's major British performances. The theme for Volume 75 is 'Othello'. The complete set of Survey volumes is also available online at https://www.cambridge.org/core/what-we-publish/collections/shakespeare-survey This fully searchable resource enables users to browse by author, essay and volume, search by play, theme and topic and save and bookmark their results.

Studies in Honour of Guido Avezz Vol 1 2

Meyers Usher, Penelope (2018), “Greek Sacrifice in Shakespeare's Rome: Titus Andronicus and Iphigenia in Aulis”, in Dennis Austin Britton and Melissa Walter (eds), Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study. Audiences, Authors, and Digital ...

                              Studies in Honour of Guido Avezz    Vol  1 2

Συναγωνίζεσθαι, the ancient Greek verb chosen as the title of this volume, belongs to the jargon of dramaturgy as employed by Aristotle inPoetics, where he emphasizes the function of the Chorus as an active co-protagonist in the dynamics of drama. Here it suggests the collaborative nature of this Festschrift offered to Guido Avezzù in the year of his retirement by friends and colleagues. The volume collects a wide selection of contributions by international scholars, grouped into four sections: Greek Tragedy (Part 1), Greek Comedy (Part 2), Reception (Part 3), and Theatre and Beyond (Part 4). The Authors. A. Andrisano, P. Angeli Bernardini, A. Bagordo, A. Bierl, S. Bigliazzi, M.G. Bonanno, S. Brunetti, D. Cairns, G. Cerri, V. Citti, A.T. Cozzoli ,F. Dall’Olio, M. Di Marco, M. Duranti, S. Fornaro, A. Grilli, S. Halliwell, E.M. Harris, O. Imperio, P. Judet de La Combe, W. Lapini, V. Liapis, L. Lomiento, F. Lupi, A. Markantonatos, G. Mastromarco, E. Medda, F. Montana, F. Montanari, C. Neri, E. Nicholson, R. Nicolai, H. Notsu, G. Paduano, N. Pasqualicchio, M.P. Pattoni, A. Provenza, J. Redondo, A. Scafuro, S.L. Schein, A. Sidiropoulou, R. Tosi, P. Totaro, M. Treu, M. Tulli, G. Ugolini, P. Volpe, M. Zanolla

Greek Tragic Women on Shakespearean Stages

Although Shakespeare's earlier history plays overlap with tragedy in titles and style, the genres have been ... in Shakespeare's Rome: Titus Andronicus and Iphigenia in Aulis,” in Rethinking Shakespeare Source Study: Audiences, Authors, ...

Greek Tragic Women on Shakespearean Stages

Greek Tragic Women on Shakespearean Stages argues that ancient Greek plays exerted a powerful and uncharted influence on early modern England's dramatic landscape. Drawing on original research to challenge longstanding assumptions about Greek texts' invisibility, the book shows not only that the plays were more prominent than we have believed, but that early modern readers and audiences responded powerfully to specific plays and themes. The Greek plays most popular in the period were not male-centered dramas such as Sophocles' Oedipus, but tragedies by Euripides that focused on raging bereaved mothers and sacrificial virgin daughters, especially Hecuba and Iphigenia. Because tragedy was firmly linked with its Greek origin in the period's writings, these iconic female figures acquired a privileged status as synecdoches for the tragic theater and its ability to conjure sympathetic emotions in audiences. When Hamlet reflects on the moving power of tragic performance, he turns to the most prominent of these figures: 'What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba/ That he should weep for her?' Through readings of plays by Shakespeare and his contemporary dramatists, this book argues that newly visible Greek plays, identified with the origins of theatrical performance and represented by passionate female figures, challenged early modern writers to reimagine the affective possibilities of tragedy, comedy, and the emerging genre of tragicomedy.