Journey to Moscow

Journey to Moscow


Between Tel Aviv and Moscow

A Life of Dissent and Exile in Mandate Palestine and the Soviet Union

Between Tel Aviv and Moscow

Leah Trachtman-Palchan was an ordinary woman who lived an extraordinary life. This was a life of migration, dissent, exile and survival. Born in the final years of Tsarist Russia, her family was forced to leave their small town following the repeated pogroms of the Civil War era. A two year voyage followed, bringing them all to British Mandate Palestine in 1921. Here what seems like a typical Jewish story of migration from Eastern Europe in the early twentieth century took an unexpected turn. As a teenager, Leah joined the Communist movement in Palestine - illegal under the British Mandate. She was arrested, imprisoned and eventually deported by the British to the Soviet Union. This memoir is filled with colourful, and sometimes harrowing, sketches of the people who passed through her life during the era of Stalin's Great Purges and the evacuation of factories to Siberia during World War II. Shedding new light on both Mandate Palestine and the Jewish experience in Soviet Moscow, this book reveals the remarkable story of a woman living through some of the most pivotal events of twentieth-century history.

Envoy to Moscow

Memories of an Israeli Ambassador, 1988-92

Envoy to Moscow

The personal memoir of Aryeh Levin, Israel's first Ambassador to Russia since the severance of relations between the two countries in 1967. Aryeh Levin's four-year tenure as Ambassador to Moscow coincided with great upheavals in the life and times of both Israel and Russia. He was witness to the momentous events that led to the collapse of the Soviet empire and was instrumental in facilitating the immigration of almost half a million Jews to Israel.

Stafford Cripps' Mission to Moscow, 1940-42

Stafford Cripps' Mission to Moscow, 1940-42

A lively revisionist account of Cripps' ambassadorship to Moscow at a turning-point in the war.

Return to Armageddon

The United States and the Nuclear Arms Race, 1981-1999

Return to Armageddon

When the Cold War ended, the world let out a collective sigh of relief as the fear of nuclear confrontation between superpowers appeared to vanish overnight. As we approach the new millennium, however, the proliferation of nuclear weapons to ever more belligerent countries and factions raises alarming new concerns about the threat of nuclear war. In Return to Armageddon, Ronald Powaski assesses the dangers that beset us as we enter an increasingly unstable political world. With the START I and II treaties, completed by George Bush in 1991 and 1993 respectively, and the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), signed by Bill Clinton in 1996, it seemed as if the nuclear clock had been successfully turned back to a safer hour. But Powaski shows that there is much less reason for optimism than we may like to think. Continued U.S.-Russian cooperation can no longer be assured. To make matters worse, Russia has not ratified the START II Treaty and the U.S. Senate has failed to approve the CTBT. Perhaps even more ominously, the effort to prevent the acquisition of nuclear weapons by nonweapon states is threatened by nuclear tests conducted by India and Pakistan. The nuclear club is growing and its most recent members are increasingly hostile. Indeed, it is becoming ever more difficult to keep track of the expertise and material needed to build nuclear weapons, which almost certainly will find their way into terrorist hands. Accessible, authoritative, and provocative, Return to Armageddon provides both a comprehensive account of the arms control process and a startling reappraisal of the nuclear threat that refuses to go away.

Ho Chi Minh

The Missing Years, 1919-1941

Ho Chi Minh

This biography focuses on Ho's early political career, from his emergence at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919, to his organisation of the Viet Minh United Front at the start of the Second World War. Using previously untapped sources from Comintern and French intelligence archives, Sophie Quinn-Judge examines Ho's life in the light of two interconnecting themes - the origins and institutional development of the Indochinese Communist Party (ICP) and the impact on early Vietnamese communism of political developments in China and the Soviet Union.

Return to the Middle Kingdom

One Family, Three Revolutionaries, and the Birth of Modern China

Return to the Middle Kingdom

The author chronicles three generations of her late husband's family, all of who fought against the injustices they encountered in their homeland of China.

Barbarossa and the Retreat to Moscow

Recollections of Soviet Fighter Pilots on the Eastern Front

Barbarossa and the Retreat to Moscow

The onset of war in the summer of 1941 was a disaster for the Soviet Air Force. In a few weeks, faced by the onslaught of the Luftwaffe, most of the Soviet frontline aircraft were destroyed, and the casualty rate among the pilots was cripplingly high. Yet the surviving few gained precious battle experience and they formed the core of the fighter force that turned the tables on the Germans and eventually won air superiority over the Eastern Front. Many of these Soviet pilots are still alive today and in this book they vividly recall the air battles of 60 years ago.