Rhodes in the Hellenistic Age

This book offers a detailed political history of Rhodes from the foundation of the Rhodian republic in the fifth century B.C. to the conclusions of Rhodes' alliance with Rome in the second, a period in which Rhodes was a major Mediterranean ...

Rhodes in the Hellenistic Age

This book offers a detailed political history of Rhodes from the foundation of the Rhodian republic in the fifth century B.C. to the conclusions of Rhodes' alliance with Rome in the second, a period in which Rhodes was a major Mediterranean power. Richard M. Berthold provides a complete account of Rhodian foreign affairs, exploring the principles and reasons behind Rhodes' foreign policy decisions. He traces Rhodes' history through the stormy years of the fourth century to the independence and prosperity of the third, arguing that Rhodes achieved economic and political success by pursuing a course of studied neutrality. Berthold maintains that Rhodes did not willfully abandon its neutral stance during the second century, but rather was forced by events to support Rome, a posture that ultimately led to Rhodes' loss of independence.

Rhodes

Rhodes would reach the zenith of its power in the Hellenistic period following the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BCE.

Rhodes

*Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts describing Rhodes *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading Modern perceptions of Classical Greece are almost invariably based on Athens and Sparta, but there are perhaps few areas as consistently undervalued as the island of Rhodes. Although solidly part of the Greek world for as long as there has been one, Rhodes, located just off the coast of Asia Minor, was also from its earliest times a port opening to the civilizations of the Eastern Mediterranean, and Rhodes was involved in every significant moment in ancient Greek history. The island often played a key role in world events which far surpassed its small size, and at one point even stood side-by-side with much larger kingdoms as one of the main powers in the Greek world. Rhodes would reach the zenith of its power in the Hellenistic period following the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BCE. Even as the rest of the city-states waned compared to the much larger kingdoms of Alexander's successors in Egypt and Asia, Rhodes would come to the forefront as a main power in the Greek world, standing toe-to-toe with these Hellenistic kingdoms. Rhodes was for a time the foremost naval power in the Eastern Mediterranean, and one of the most powerful and richest cities in the world. It was during this time that the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, was built on the island to celebrate Rhodes' equally monumental triumph over the armies of Demetrius the Besieger. Rhodes also gained a foothold on other islands, and an extensive presence in Asia Minor. With the rise of Rome, Rhodes, along with the rest of the Greek world, lost power, and it was gradually integrated into the Roman sphere of influence as an ally before finally being annexed into the empire. After the partition and collapse of the ancient Roman Empire, in the Middle Ages Rhodes would share in both the fortunes and vicissitudes of Rome's successor state, the Byzantine Empire. Along with the Byzantines, Rhodes would face off first against the Arabs from the East, and then European Crusaders from the West. As the Byzantine Empire continued to lose power and chaos spread in its former holdings, Rhodes would eventually be occupied by the Knights Hospitaller, an order of Crusading knights who initially arrived on the island while retreating from the Holy Land. These knights would hold on to Rhodes for over 200 years, making it the headquarters of their unique military, economic, and piratical empire. It became a bastion of Christendom and a reminder of the former power of the Crusaders in an Eastern Mediterranean region increasingly dominated by Islam. When the Rhodian castle of the knights, still standing today, finally fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1522, Rhodes entered a long period of Turkish rule that lasted almost 400 years. It was only in 1948, after successive and brief Italian, German and British occupations, that the island was finally united with the modern Greek state, but to this day, thanks to its impressive archaeological sites, Rhodes still bears the indelible marks of its storied past. Rhodes: The History and Legacy of the Greek Island from Ancient Times to Today examines one of the most important Greek powers throughout its long and illustrious history. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about Rhodes like never before.

Ancient Greece s Most Important Islands

*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography for further reading Nearly 2,500 years after the Golden Age of Athens, people across the world today continue to be fascinated by the ancient Greeks, but who did the Ancient Greeks look up to?

Ancient Greece s Most Important Islands

*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography for further reading Nearly 2,500 years after the Golden Age of Athens, people across the world today continue to be fascinated by the ancient Greeks, but who did the Ancient Greeks look up to? The answer to that question can be found in Homer's The Odyssey, in which Odysseus makes note of "a great town there, Cnossus, where Minos reigned." It was perhaps the earliest reference to the Minoan civilization, a mysterious ancient civilization that historians and archaeologists still puzzle over, but a civilization that renowned historian Will Durant described as "the first link in the European chain." Nearly 2,000 years before Homer wrote his epic poems, the Minoan civilization was centered on the island of Crete, a location that required the Minoans to be a regional sea power. And indeed they were, stretching across the Aegean Sea from about 2700-1500 BCE with trade routes extending all the way to Egypt. Modern perceptions of Classical Greece are almost invariably based on Athens and Sparta, but there are perhaps few areas as consistently undervalued as the island of Rhodes. Although solidly part of the Greek world for as long as there has been one, Rhodes, located just off the coast of Asia Minor, was also from its earliest times a port opening to the civilizations of the Eastern Mediterranean, and Rhodes was involved in every significant moment in ancient Greek history. The island often played a key role in world events which far surpassed its small size, and at one point even stood side-by-side with much larger kingdoms as one of the main powers in the Greek world. In the Archaic and Classical periods, Rhodes often stood as a prime exemplar of the highs and lows of its fellow Greek cities, and as the largest island of the Dodecanese, Rhodes' history is largely in line with that of the rest of those islands. Rhodes would reach the zenith of its power in the Hellenistic period following the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BCE. Even as the rest of the city-states waned compared to the much larger kingdoms of Alexander's successors in Egypt and Asia, Rhodes would come to the forefront as a main power in the Greek world, standing toe-to-toe with these Hellenistic kingdoms. Rhodes was for a time the foremost naval power in the Eastern Mediterranean, and one of the most powerful and richest cities in the world. It was during this time that the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, was built on the island to celebrate Rhodes' equally monumental triumph over the armies of Demetrius the Besieger. It is hard to find an island on the map more central than Sicily. Located at the crossroads between Europe and Africa, and between the Eastern and Western Mediterranean, Sicily has rarely been governed as an independent, unified state. Nonetheless, the island has always occupied a front-row seat to some of the most important events in history, and nowhere is this more obvious than during antiquity. It was during the Classical era that, especially under the tyrants (dictators) of the Greek city of Syracuse, Sicily came the closest to being governed as a single, unified, and independent state. In time, it came to challenge the powerful trade empire of Carthage, a former Phoenician colony in North Africa, and it vied with the cities and kingdoms of mainland Greece for primacy in the Greek world. Later on, Sicily would be both a prize and a battlefield during the First Punic War (263-241 BCE) and, to a lesser degree, also during the Second Punic War (218-201 BCE). These were massive, protracted conflicts between Carthage and the rising Roman Republic, and Rome would subsequently become the main power in the Mediterranean on its way to ruling much of the known world. Sicily would go on to become the Roman Republic's first territory outside of Italy and its first province.

Politics of Association in Hellenistic Rhodes

A new perspective on political organisation in Hellenistic Rhodes and the ancient Greek citystateThe first comprehensive study of Rhodes in more than 20 years and one of the few books dedicated to a single Hellenistic city-stateIntroduces ...

Politics of Association in Hellenistic Rhodes

A new perspective on political organisation in Hellenistic Rhodes and the ancient Greek citystateThe first comprehensive study of Rhodes in more than 20 years and one of the few books dedicated to a single Hellenistic city-stateIntroduces the reader to Hellenistic Rhodes, an important, but also remarkably understudied, city-state of the ancient Greek and Roman world Challenges traditional assumptions about political organization in the ancient Greek city-state Documents the existence of an alternative conception of the ancient Greek city-state, which will inspire new approaches to the study of the ancient Greek city-state, politics and society.Christian Thomsen offers a study of political institutions on the island state of Rhodes - an important power in the eastern Mediterranean and the first city of the Hellenistic world. Using Aristotle's notion of the polis as an 'association of associations' as its point of departure, Thomsen provides an analysis of political institutions, taking a broader view of what constitutes an institution than traditional studies of the ancient Greek city-state. Among the institutions surveyed are the family, civic subdivisions such as tribes and demes as well as private associations. He argues that these organisations served as important junctions in the networks of political elites and shaped the political landscape of Hellenistic Rhodes.

Ancient Rhodes

Ancient Rhodes: The History and Legacy of the Famous Greek Island in Antiquity examines the history of one of the most important Greek powers of the ancient world.

Ancient Rhodes

*Includes pictures *Includes ancient accounts of Rhodes *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading Modern perceptions of Classical Greece are almost invariably based on Athens and Sparta, but there are perhaps few areas as consistently undervalued as the island of Rhodes. Although solidly part of the Greek world for as long as there has been one, Rhodes, located just off the coast of Asia Minor, was also from its earliest times a port opening to the civilizations of the Eastern Mediterranean, and Rhodes was involved in every significant moment in ancient Greek history. The island often played a key role in world events which far surpassed its small size, and at one point even stood side-by-side with much larger kingdoms as one of the main powers in the Greek world. In the Archaic and Classical periods, Rhodes often stood as a prime exemplar of the highs and lows of its fellow Greek cities, and as the largest island of the Dodecanese, Rhodes' history is largely in line with that of the rest of those islands. Rhodes was first colonized by the Greeks of the Dorian tribe around the 8th century BCE, and it aligned with its fellow Dorian cities on the surrounding islands and the mainland of Asia Minor to form the so-called Doric Hexapolis. After the Ionian revolt near the end of the 6th century BCE, Rhodes, along with other islands, was in the path of the Persian fleet that crossed the Aegean to face off against the Greeks in the Persian Wars. In the aftermath of the Persian Wars, along with the rest of the islands and with Greek Asia Minor, Rhodes was subsumed into the Athenian alliance, which would soon become the Athenian Empire. However, Athens would soon lose its power, and around the end of the Peloponnesian War against Sparta, its hold on its allies would wane. In fact, in 408 BCE, Rhodes, sharing a Dorian heritage with Sparta, would be among the first and most powerful of Athens' allies to revolt, and it played a key role in the end of the Peloponnesian War by providing a basis for the new Spartan fleet to challenge Athenian naval supremacy. In the following century, Rhodes would vacillate between the Athenian and Spartan spheres of influence, all the while remaining too large to be permanently subdued by either city, and thus constantly growing in power. Rhodes would reach the zenith of its power in the Hellenistic period following the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BCE. Even as the rest of the city-states waned compared to the much larger kingdoms of Alexander's successors in Egypt and Asia, Rhodes would come to the forefront as a main power in the Greek world, standing toe-to-toe with these Hellenistic kingdoms. Rhodes was for a time the foremost naval power in the Eastern Mediterranean, and one of the most powerful and richest cities in the world. It was during this time that the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, was built on the island to celebrate Rhodes' equally monumental triumph over the armies of Demetrius the Besieger. Rhodes also gained a foothold on other islands, and an extensive presence in Asia Minor. It was only due to the rise of Rome that Rhodes, along with the rest of the Greek world, lost power, and it was gradually integrated into the Roman sphere of influence as an ally before finally being annexed into the empire. Ancient Rhodes: The History and Legacy of the Famous Greek Island in Antiquity examines the history of one of the most important Greek powers of the ancient world. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about Rhodes like never before.

Politics of Association in Hellenistic Rhodes

Christian Thomsen offers a study of political institutions on the island state of Rhodes - an important power in the eastern Mediterranean and the first city of the Hellenistic world.

Politics of Association in Hellenistic Rhodes

A new perspective on political organisation in Hellenistic Rhodes and the ancient Greek citystateThe first comprehensive study of Rhodes in more than 20 years and one of the few books dedicated to a single Hellenistic city-stateIntroduces the reader to Hellenistic Rhodes, an important, but also remarkably understudied, city-state of the ancient Greek and Roman world Challenges traditional assumptions about political organization in the ancient Greek city-state Documents the existence of an alternative conception of the ancient Greek city-state, which will inspire new approaches to the study of the ancient Greek city-state, politics and society.Christian Thomsen offers a study of political institutions on the island state of Rhodes - an important power in the eastern Mediterranean and the first city of the Hellenistic world. Using Aristotle's notion of the polis as an 'association of associations' as its point of departure, Thomsen provides an analysis of political institutions, taking a broader view of what constitutes an institution than traditional studies of the ancient Greek city-state. Among the institutions surveyed are the family, civic subdivisions such as tribes and demes as well as private associations. He argues that these organisations served as important junctions in the networks of political elites and shaped the political landscape of Hellenistic Rhodes.

Rhodes After Antiquity

Rhodes after Antiquity: The History and Legacy of the Famous Greek Island in the Middle Ages and the Modern Era examines the history of one of the most crucial locations in the Mediterranean.

Rhodes After Antiquity

*Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading In the Archaic and Classical periods, Rhodes often stood as a prime exemplar of the highs and lows of its fellow Greek cities, and as the largest island of the Dodecanese, Rhodes' history is largely in line with that of the rest of those islands. Rhodes was first colonized by the Greeks of the Dorian tribe around the 8th century BCE, and it aligned with its fellow Dorian cities on the surrounding islands and the mainland of Asia Minor to form the so-called Doric Hexapolis. Rhodes would reach the zenith of its power in the Hellenistic period following the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BCE. Even as the rest of the city-states waned compared to the much larger kingdoms of Alexander's successors in Egypt and Asia, Rhodes would come to the forefront as a main power in the Greek world, standing toe-to-toe with these Hellenistic kingdoms. Rhodes was for a time the foremost naval power in the Eastern Mediterranean, and one of the most powerful and richest cities in the world. It was during this time that the Colossus of Rhodes, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, was built on the island to celebrate Rhodes' equally monumental triumph over the armies of Demetrius the Besieger. Rhodes also gained a foothold on other islands, and an extensive presence in Asia Minor. With the rise of Rome, Rhodes, along with the rest of the Greek world, lost power, and it was gradually integrated into the Roman sphere of influence as an ally before finally being annexed into the empire, but after the partition and collapse of the ancient Roman Empire, in the Middle Ages Rhodes would share in both the fortunes and vicissitudes of Rome's successor state, the Byzantine Empire. Along with the Byzantines, Rhodes would face off first against the Arabs from the East, and then European Crusaders from the West. As the Byzantine Empire continued to lose power and chaos spread in its former holdings, Rhodes would eventually be occupied by the Knights Hospitaller, an order of Crusading knights who initially arrived on the island while retreating from the Holy Land. These knights would hold on to Rhodes for over 200 years, making it the headquarters of their unique military, economic, and piratical empire. It became a bastion of Christendom and a reminder of the former power of the Crusaders in an Eastern Mediterranean region increasingly dominated by Islam. When the Rhodian castle of the knights, still standing today, finally fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1522, Rhodes entered a long period of Turkish rule that lasted almost 400 years. It was only in 1948, after successive and brief Italian, German and British occupations, that the island was finally united with the modern Greek state. To this day, thanks to its impressive archaeological sites, Rhodes still bears the indelible marks of its storied past. Rhodes after Antiquity: The History and Legacy of the Famous Greek Island in the Middle Ages and the Modern Era examines the history of one of the most crucial locations in the Mediterranean. Along with pictures depicting important people, places, and events, you will learn about Rhodes like never before.

Dare to Struggle

WHY SHOULD YOU READ A GREEK HISTORY?

Dare to Struggle

WHY SHOULD YOU READ A GREEK HISTORY? Because you simply cannot consider yourself an educated person unless you know something about the society of ancient Greece. Because the Greeks discovered the foundation elements of Western society: constitutionalism, rationalism, humanism and the individual. Because Greek history is in effect our own history. Because the Greeks were seriously cool. WHY SHOULD YOU READ THISGREEK HISTORY? Because it answers the important questions that others do not. Because it relates Greek history to contemporary society. Because it covers ALL the topics. Because it is NOT boring or politically correct.

The Naval Aristocracy of Hellenistic Rhodes

The book contends that a constantly publicised pride in naval experience was paramount to the self-perception of the upper class. It was the basis of their role in the military, political and commercial infrastructure.

The Naval Aristocracy of Hellenistic Rhodes

This study posits that the distinction of Hellenistic Rhodes, exemplified by economic prosperity, internal stability, military might and high political esteem among foreign powers, can be directly linked to the naval aristocracy. The book contends that a constantly publicised pride in naval experience was paramount to the self-perception of the upper class. It was the basis of their role in the military, political and commercial infrastructure. By analysing the role of the wealthy, who personally owned the ships used both for warfare and commerce, their financial responsibility for personnel, and the ramifications of this power, Gabrielson explains the organisation of the society as a whole. By providing economic security, the aristocracy promoted domestic peace that, in turn, allowed for expansion overseas, thereby re-securing their own power and labour forces. The navy safeguarded mercantile routes.

Greek History Hellenistic Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

Rhodes in the Hellenistic age. Ithaca, NY: Cornell Univ. Press. Has not been replaced as a general treatment of Hellenistic Rhodes, but its readers should always consult Gabrielsen, et al. 1999, Gabrielsen 1997, and Wiemer 2002 for the ...

Greek History  Hellenistic  Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of the ancient world find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated. A reader will discover, for instance, the most reliable introductions and overviews to the topic, and the most important publications on various areas of scholarly interest within this topic. In classics, as in other disciplines, researchers at all levels are drowning in potentially useful scholarly information, and this guide has been created as a tool for cutting through that material to find the exact source you need. This ebook is just one of many articles from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Classics, a continuously updated and growing online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through the scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of classics. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.aboutobo.com.

The Hellenistic Age

Predictably, this is a story of war and power-politics, and of the developing fortunes of art, science, and statecraft in the areas where Alexander’s coming disseminated Hellenic culture.

The Hellenistic Age

The Hellenistic era witnessed the overlap of antiquity’s two great Western civilizations, the Greek and the Roman. This was the epoch of Alexander’s vast expansion of the Greco-Macedonian world, the rise and fall of his successors’ major dynasties in Egypt and Asia, and, ultimately, the establishment of Rome as the first Mediterranean superpower. The Hellenistic Age chronicles the years 336 to 30 BCE, from the days of Philip and Alexander of Macedon to the death of Cleopatra and the final triumph of Caesar’s heir, the young Augustus. Peter Green’s remarkably far-ranging study covers the prevalent themes and events of those centuries: the Hellenization of an immense swath of the known world–from Egypt to India–by Alexander’s conquests; the lengthy and chaotic partition of this empire by rival Macedonian marshals after Alexander’s death; the decline of the polis (city state) as the predominant political institution; and, finally, Rome’s moment of transition from republican to imperial rule. Predictably, this is a story of war and power-politics, and of the developing fortunes of art, science, and statecraft in the areas where Alexander’s coming disseminated Hellenic culture. It is a rich narrative tapestry of warlords, libertines, philosophers, courtesans and courtiers, dramatists, historians, scientists, merchants, mercenaries, and provocateurs of every stripe, spun by an accomplished classicist with an uncanny knack for infusing life into the distant past, and applying fresh insights that make ancient history seem alarmingly relevant to our own times. To consider the three centuries prior to the dawn of the common era in a single short volume demands a scholar with a great command of both subject and narrative line. The Hellenistic Age is that rare book that manages to coalesce a broad spectrum of events, persons, and themes into one brief, indispensable, and amazingly accessible survey.

Hellenistic Rhodes

Hellenistic Rhodes


Greece The Hellenistic Age eBook

Among the topics covered in this volume are Alexandrian conquests, advances in mathematics and science, the sculpture, architecture, philosophy and oratory of the Hellenic period, and the Hellenistic spirit.

Greece  The Hellenistic Age  eBook

Greece—The Hellenistic Age contains 12 full-color transparencies (print books) or PowerPoint slides (eBooks), 4 reproducible pages, and a richly detailed teacher's guide. Among the topics covered in this volume are Alexandrian conquests, advances in mathematics and science, the sculpture, architecture, philosophy and oratory of the Hellenic period, and the Hellenistic spirit.

Greek History Hellenistic Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

In classics, as in other disciplines, researchers at all levels are drowning in potentially useful scholarly information, and this guide has been created as a tool for cutting through that material to find the exact source you need.

Greek History  Hellenistic  Oxford Bibliographies Online Research Guide

This ebook is a selective guide designed to help scholars and students of the ancient world find reliable sources of information by directing them to the best available scholarly materials in whatever form or format they appear from books, chapters, and journal articles to online archives, electronic data sets, and blogs. Written by a leading international authority on the subject, the ebook provides bibliographic information supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult and editorial commentary to make it clear how the cited sources are interrelated. A reader will discover, for instance, the most reliable introductions and overviews to the topic, and the most important publications on various areas of scholarly interest within this topic. In classics, as in other disciplines, researchers at all levels are drowning in potentially useful scholarly information, and this guide has been created as a tool for cutting through that material to find the exact source you need. This ebook is just one of many articles from Oxford Bibliographies Online: Classics, a continuously updated and growing online resource designed to provide authoritative guidance through the scholarship and other materials relevant to the study of classics. Oxford Bibliographies Online covers most subject disciplines within the social science and humanities, for more information visit www.aboutobo.com.

Hellenistic Rhodes

This final volume of the series Studies in Hellenistic Civilization continues the vibrant record of the contemporary interest in, and success with, uncovering the details of a remarkable time and place.

Hellenistic Rhodes

Rhodes was founded more that 2,400 years ago, yet our fascination for this prosperous trading center continues across the millennia. One of the most beautiful cities ever built, Rhodes had a profound influence on the Roman, and subsequent western, civilization. Hellenistic Rhodes introduces the latest research carried out by European scholars. Individual chapters approach various aspects of the politics, culture and society of Rhodes and its sphere of influence from historical, archaeological and philosophical perspectives. These multidisciplinary essays center on the Rhodian demes, relations between Rhodes and the Rhodian Peraia, the relations between Rhodes and Caria, Rhodes and Lycia in Hellenistic times, the marginalization of Crete in Greek thought, the role of piracy in the outbreak of the First Cretan War, and the Eastern Mediterranean wine trade. Also considered is the evidence from Rhodian amphorae of the trade between Rhodes and Alexandria, pottery and jewelry from Rhodian graves and aspects of Rhodian tombs. A final essay discusses the importance of the transformation of stoicism by Panaetius and Posidonius. This final volume of the series Studies in Hellenistic Civilization continues the vibrant record of the contemporary interest in, and success with, uncovering the details of a remarkable time and place.

Ancient Siege Warfare

See Richard M. Berthold , Rhodes in the Hellenistic Age ( Ithaca : Cornell University Press , 1984 ) , chap . 1 , for a more detailed account of the early history of Rhodes . 30. Diodorus 20.93.1 .

Ancient Siege Warfare

This book examines how siege warfare was able to unleash unrestrained violence. It shows how the methods of siege warfare devalued the skills of traditional warriors, along with the shared values of honor and prowess that limited the violence of traditional field battles.

Hellenistic Sculpture

For the history of its restoration and later fame , see Haskell and Penny ... Bieber , Hellenistic Age , fig . 575. ... Satyr in Rhodes : G. S. Merker , The Hellenistic Sculpture of Rhodes ( SIMA 40 , Göteborg 1973 ) 29 , no .

Hellenistic Sculpture

Now available in paperback, this rigorous and challenging book questions the Hellenistic dating of many famous monuments, based on careful examination of evidence. "Fluently written, clearly organized, and thoroughly and impeccably documented. Anyone who has a serious interest in Hellenistic art will want to read it and refer to it."--Jerome J. Pollitt, Yale University

Apollonius of Rhodes and the Spaces of Hellenism

This book explores the poem's relation to the conditions of its writing in third century BCE Alexandria, where a multicultural environment transformed the Greeks' understanding of themselves and the world.

Apollonius of Rhodes and the Spaces of Hellenism

Although Apollonius of Rhodes' extraordinary epic poem on the Argonauts' quest for the Golden Fleece has begun to get the attention it deserves, it still is not well known to many readers and scholars. This book explores the poem's relation to the conditions of its writing in third century BCE Alexandria, where a multicultural environment transformed the Greeks' understanding of themselves and the world. Apollonius uses the resources of the imagination - the myth of the Argonauts' voyage and their encounters with other peoples - to probe the expanded possibilities and the anxieties opened up when definitions of Hellenism and boundaries between Greeks and others were exposed to question. Central to this concern with definitions is the poem's representation of space. Thalmann uses spatial theories from cultural geography and anthropology to argue that the Argo's itinerary defines space from a Greek perspective that is at the same time qualified. Its limits are exposed, and the signs with which the Argonauts mark space by their passage preserve the stories of their complex interactions with non-Greeks. The book closely considers many episodes in the narrative with regard to the Argonauts' redefinition of space and the implications of their actions for the Greeks' situation in Egypt, and it ends by considering Alexandria itself as a space that accommodated both Greek and Egyptian cultures.

Hellenistic Economies

Focusing on the central period of the Mediterranean 330-30 BC, this book contributes substantially to the debate, by juxtaposing general questions of theory and model-building with case-studies which examine specific areas and kinds of ...

Hellenistic Economies

The economies of classical and Mediterranean antiquity are currently a battleground. Some scholars see them as lively and progressive, even proto-capitalist: others see them as static, embedded in social action and status relationships. Focusing on the central period of the Mediterranean 330-30 BC, this book contributes substantially to the debate, by juxtaposing general questions of theory and model-building with case-studies which examine specific areas and kinds of evidence. It breaks new ground by distilling and presenting new and newly-reinterpreted evidence for the Hellenistic era, by opening the debate on how we should replace Rostovtzeff's classic view of this period, and by offering a compelling new set of interpretative ideas to the debate on the ancient economy.