Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand Loom Weaver

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand Loom Weaver

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand Loom Weaver Classic Reprint

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Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand Loom Weaver  Classic Reprint

Excerpt from Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand-Loom Weaver Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand-Loom Weaver was written by William Thom in 1845. This is a 202 page book, containing 42775 words and 4 pictures. Search Inside is enabled for this title. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand loom Weaver

In the autumn of 1844 the “ Rhymes and Recollections of a Handloom Weaver were published . The first thousand was rapidly disposed of , and , in addition , the poet found himself much sought after and flattered .

Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand loom Weaver


Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand loom Weaver

... looking to the sepulchral character of the Bass , and to the high probability that Eth finished his days here , I am inclined to believe that this barrow holds the remains of that unfortunate Pictish monarch . The old rhyme , 1 1 ...

Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand loom Weaver


The Foreign And Colonial Quarterly Review

Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand - Loom Weaver . By William Thom , of Inverury . Second Edition . London : Smith & Elder . Nor the least interesting portion of this delightful volume , are the “ Recollections , ” which are at once ...

The Foreign And Colonial Quarterly Review


New Quarterly Review Or Home Foreign and Colonial Journal

Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand - Loom Weaver . By William Thom , of Inverury . Second Edition . London : Smith & Elder . Not the least interesting portion of this delightful volume , are the “ Recollections , ” which are at once ...

New Quarterly Review  Or  Home  Foreign and Colonial Journal


Social Change in the Industrial Revolution

One persistent feature of the weavers' decline was their withdrawal from community attachments. Membership in friendly societies declined, public worship ... 3 W. Thom, Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand-loom Weaver (London, 1844), p.

Social Change in the Industrial Revolution

First Published in 2005. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Nineteenth Century English Labouring Class Poets Vol 2

... A Legendary Tale From Homely Rhymes, Poems, and Reminiscences (1864) The Landowner WILLIAM THOM (1799–1848) From Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand-Loom Weaver (1844) From [To the Reader] From [Recollections] From the Northern Star ...

Nineteenth Century English Labouring Class Poets Vol 2

Over 100 poets of labouring class origin were published in Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries. Some were hugely popular and important in their day but few are available today. This is a collection of some of those poems from the 19th century.

The Mainstream Companion to Scottish Literature

A collection, Rhymes and Recollections of a Handloom Weaver, was published in 1844 and Thom moved to London, where he was lionized in literary and social circles as the 'weaver poet'. Second and third editions of Rhymes and ...

The Mainstream Companion to Scottish Literature

The Mainstream Companion to Scottish Literature is the most comprehensive reference guide to Scotland's literature, covering a period from the earliest times to the early 1990s. It includes over 600 essays on the lives and works of the principal poets, novelists, dramatists critics and men and women of letters who have written in English, Scots or Gaelic. Thus, as well as such major writers as Robert Henryson, William Dunbar, Gavin Douglas, Allan Ramsay, Robert Fergusson, Robert Burns, Walter Scott, Robert Louis Stevenson and Hugh MacDiarmid, the Companion also lists many minor writers whose work might otherwise have been overlooked in any survey of Scottish literature. Also included here are entries on the lives of other more peripheral writers such as historians, philosophers, diarists and divines whose work has made a contribution to Scottish letters. Other essays range over such general subjects as the principal work of major writers, literary movements, historical events, the world of printing and publishing, folklore, journalism, drama and Gaelic. A feature of the book is the inclusion of the bibliography of each writer and reference to the major critical works. This comprehensive guide is an essential tool for the serious student of Scottish literature as well as being an ideal guide and companion for the general reader.

Aberdeen s Union Terrace Gardens

Possibly its best known employee was the handloomweaver poet, Willie Thom, author of The Blind Boy's Pranks (1841) and Rhymes and Recollections of a Handloom Weaver which went to three editions during the 1840s. His memories were bitter ...

Aberdeen s Union Terrace Gardens

The complete, dramatic story of Union Terrace Gardens has never before been told in one volume. Now, in her eleventh book on Aberdeen, Diane Morgan presents the complete history of these iconic gardens on the west side of the Denburn Valley. From the early days as the Denburn Meadows, where sheep were corralled at the time of the nearby Woolmanhill sales, to the transformation of the meadows into the Great Bleachery which played a crucial role in Aberdeen's Industrial Revolution, this site has been central to the history and development of the city. And above the meadows rose the wooded Corbie Heugh - the crow cliff - where Johnnie Cope and his redcoats were encamped in 1745, prior to their disaster at Prestonpans. By the 1860s the area was in decline and being taken over by housing when the architect and future provost, James Matthews, overcame the faintheartedness and intransigence of his fellow councillors and, from the Heugh and the meadows below, created the Union Terrace Gardens we know today. Since then, Union Terrace Gardens has survived various attempts to raise and convert it, all of which have failed, including Sir Ian Wood's City Garden Project (2008-2012), which caused immense controversy in Aberdeen. This latest dramatic episode and the bitter and divisive struggle it created is described and reviewed in full. Along with an in-depth look at the handsome architecture of Union Terrace, and at the east side of the Denburn Valley, where the fate of Archibald Simpson's Triple Kirks has been sealed, Aberdeen's Union Terrace Gardens , with its authoritative text (including a crucial chapter from Mike Shepherd), and superb photography, is both a fascinating account of this important space and an indispensable addition to the written history of the city.

Idle Hands

30 Report from the Select Committee on Handloom Weavers' Petitions, with the Minutes of Evidence, 1835, (341) Report, XIII. 31 Wood, op. cit., 140. 32 William Thom, Rhymes and Recollections of a Handloom Weaver, ed. with a biographical ...

Idle Hands

Idle Hands is the first major social history of unemployment in Britain covering the last 200 years. It focuses on the experiences of working people in becoming unemployed, coping with unemployment and searching for work, and their reactions and responses to their problems. Direct evidence of the impact of unemployment drawn from extensive personal biographies complements economic and statistical analysis.

Economic Developments in Victorian Scotland

Handloom Weavers' Commn. (1841), Vol. ... Reports from Asst. Handloom Weavers' Commrs. (1839), 183–197, but cf. Myles, Rambles in Forfarshire, 80–94. W. THOM, Rhymes and Recollections of a Handloom Weaver; ed. 1880 by W. SKINNER, ...

Economic Developments in Victorian Scotland

Marwick argues that economic development in Scotland was severely delayed until the 18th Century unlike neighbouring countries. Originally published in 1936, this study aims to explore key features of economic development in Victorian Scotland to promote more understanding of this issue. Issues discussed include ownership of land and capital, administration and finances of industry, organisation of trade and marketing, labour and recruitment, trade unions, housing and other aspects which impact on the standard of life. This title will be of interest to students of Economics and Industrial History.

The Poetry and the Politics

Thom's poems were first collected in The Rhymes and Recollections of a Handloom Weaver, an edition of 123 pages printed by the Aberdeen Herald in July 1844. He settled in London partly to further his weaving trade but also to ...

The Poetry and the Politics

The nineteenth century was a time of 'movements' - political, social, moral reform causes - which drew on the energies of men and women across Britain. This book studies radical reform at the margins of early Victorian society, focusing on decades of particular social, political and technological ferment: when foreign and British promoters of extravagant technologically assisted utopias could attract many hundreds of supporters of limited means, persuaded to escape grim conditions by emigration to South America; when pioneers of vegetarianism joined the ranks of the temperance movement; and when working-class Chartists, reviving a struggle for political reform, seemed to threaten the State for a brief moment in April 1848. Through the forgotten figure of James Elmslie Duncan, 'shabby genteel' poet and self-proclaimed 'Apostle of the Messiahdom', The Poetry and the Politics considers themes including poetry's place in radical culture, the response of pantomime to the Chartist challenge to law and order, and associations between madness and revolution.Duncan became a promoter of the technological fantasies of John Adolphus Etzler, a poet of science who prophesied a future free from drudgery, through machinery powered by natural forces. Etzler dreamed of crystal palaces: Duncan's public freedom was to end dramatically in 1851 just as a real crystal palace opened to an astonished world. In addition to Duncan, James Gregory also introduces a cast of other poets, earnest reformers and agitators, such as William Thom the weaver poet of Inverury, whose metropolitan feting would end in tragedy; John Goodwyn Barmby, bearded Pontiffarch of the Communist Church; a lunatic 'Invisible Poet' of Cremorne pleasure gardens; the hatter from Reading who challenged the 'feudal' restrictions of the Game Laws by tract, trespass and stuffed jay birds; and foreign exotics such as the German-born Conrad Stollmeyer, escaping the sinking of an experimental Naval Automaton in Margate to build a fortune as theAsphalt King of Trinidad.Combining these figures with the biography of a man whose literary career was eccentric and whose public antics were capitalised upon by critics of Chartist agitation, this book is essential reading for anyone interested in radical reform and popular political movements in Victorian Britain.

A Weaver Poet and the Plague

... but these poets were preceded by other weaver-poets—Careless, Deloney, Muggins, and any number of others invisible to us because they printed anonymously or not at all. In Rhymes and Recollections of a Hand-Loom Weaver (1845), ...

A Weaver Poet and the Plague

William Muggins, an impoverished but highly literate weaver-poet, lived and wrote in London at the turn of the seventeenth century, when few of his contemporaries could even read. A Weaver-Poet and the Plague’s microhistorical approach uses Muggins’s life and writing, in which he articulates a radical vision of a commonwealth founded on labor and mutual aid, as a gateway into a broader narrative about London’s “middling sort” during the plague of 1603. In debt, in prison, and at odds with his livery company, Muggins was forced to move his family from the central London neighborhood called the Poultry to the far poorer and more densely populated parish of St. Olave’s in Southwark. It was here, confined to his home as that parish was devastated by the plague, that Muggins wrote his minor epic, London’s Mourning Garment, in 1603. The poem laments the loss of life and the suffering brought on by the plague but also reflects on the social and economic woes of the city, from the pains of motherhood and childrearing to anxieties about poverty, insurmountable debt, and a system that had failed London’s most vulnerable. Part literary criticism, part microhistory, this book reconstructs Muggins’s household, his reading, his professional and social networks, and his proximity to a culture of radical religion in Southwark. Featuring an appendix with a complete version of London’s Mourning Garment, this volume presents a street-level view of seventeenth-century London that gives agency and voice to a class that is often portrayed as passive and voiceless.