Romantic Medicine and the Gothic Imagination

This book demonstrates how Gothic literature experiments with and subverts Romantic medical debates to reassess the power of nonnormative bodies within medical, social and political spheres, and to reallocate narrative agency to bodies ...

Romantic Medicine and the Gothic Imagination

This book demonstrates how Gothic literature experiments with and subverts Romantic medical debates to reassess the power of nonnormative bodies within medical, social and political spheres, and to reallocate narrative agency to bodies typically silenced.

Embryology and the Rise of the Gothic Novel

This work is deeply learned and wonderfully accessible--and profoundly urgent.

Embryology and the Rise of the Gothic Novel


Romanticism Medicine and the Poet s Body

Fulford, Tim, “Radical Medicine and Romantic Politics.” Wordsworth Circle 35 (2004): 16–21. ... Romanticism and the Gothic: Genre, Reception, and Canon Formation. ... Gregory, Horace, “The Gothic Imagination and the Survival of Thomas.

Romanticism  Medicine  and the Poet s Body

That medicine becomes professionalized at the very moment that literature becomes "Romantic" is an important coincidence, and James Allard makes the most of it. His book restores the physical body to its proper place in Romantic studies by exploring the status of the human body during the period. With meticulous detail, he documents the way medical discourse consolidates a body susceptible to medical authority that is then represented in the works of Romantic era poets. In doing so, he attends not only to the history of medicine's professionalization but significantly to the rhetoric of legitimation that advances the authority of doctors over the bodies of patients and readers alike. After surveying trends in Romantic-era medicine and analyzing the body's treatment in key texts by Wordsworth and Joanna Baillie, Allard moves quickly to his central subject-the Poet-Physician. This hybrid figure, discovered in the works of the medically trained John Keats, John Thelwall, Thomas Lovell Beddoes, embodies the struggles occasioned by the discrepancies and affinities between medicine and poetry.

Gothic Remains

this chapter will demonstrate, medical professionals' reliance upon the Gothic imagination, and on romantic discourse more generally, enabled them to assert their authority on such mental affections as catalepsy, a stance which offers ...

Gothic Remains

The Gothic has always been fascinated with objects carrying with them a sense of horror – the decomposing body, the rigid corpse, the bleeding statue, the spectral skeleton – capable of creating a sublime form of beauty. Gothic Remains: Corpses, Terror and Anatomical Culture, 1764–1897 offers an exploration of those Gothic tropes and conventions that were most thoroughly steeped in the anatomical culture of the period – from skeletons, used to understand human anatomy, to pathological human remains exhibited in medical museums; from bodysnatching aimed at providing dissection subjects, to live-burials resulting from medical misdiagnoses and pointing to contemporary research into the signs of death. The historicist reading of canonical and less-known Gothic texts proposed throughout Gothic Remains, explored through the prism of anatomy, seeks to offer new insights into the ways in which medical practice and the medical sciences informed the aesthetics of pain and death typically read therein, and the two-way traffic that emerged between medical literature and literary texts.

William Blake s Gothic imagination

Romanticism & Ecology, Romantic Circles Praxis, www.rc.umd.edu/praxis/ecology/ [accessed 5 February 2015]. ... A. Mangham and G. Depledge (eds), The Female Body in Medicine and Literature, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 111–12.

William Blake s Gothic imagination

While overlooked by extant studies of the Gothic, William Blake’s literary and visual oeuvre embodies the same obsessions and fears that inform the Gothic revival with which he was contemporary.

The Gothic Imagination

JCT: And there'sthesense ofalienation wefindinthe Gothic tradition ... allthose tales aboutoutsidersof one sortor ... You'll find in thisperiodthat psychoanalysis asa separate discipline—althoughan offspringofthemedical profession ...

The Gothic Imagination

This book brings together the author's interviews with many prominent figures in fantasy, horror, and science fiction to examine the traditions and extensions of the gothic mode of storytelling over the last 200 years and its contemporary influence on film and media.

Anti Semitism and British Gothic Literature

Popkin, Richard H. 'Medicine, Racism, Anti-Semitism: A Dimension of Enlightenment Culture'. ... “In the Hands of an Angry God: Religious Terror in Gothic Fiction'. The Gothic Imagination: Essays in Dark Romanticism, ed. G.R. Thompson.

Anti Semitism and British Gothic Literature

Anti-Semitism and British Gothic Literature examines the Gothic's engagement with the Jewish Question and British national identity over the course of a century. Beginning with an exploration of Jewish demonology from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment, Davison interprets the changing significance of the trans-national Wandering Jew in classic Gothic fiction who later migrates into Victorian realism. What emerges is the elucidation of an anti-Semitic 'spectropoetics' that convey how the spectres of Jewish difference and Jewish assimilation haunt British literature.

Gothic Nightmares

Gothic Nightmares


The Caribbean and the Medical Imagination 1764 1834

... MARGARET RUSSETT 26 Coleridge on Dreaming: Romanticism, Dreams and the Medical Imagination JENNIFER FORD 27. ... and English Romanticism GREGORY DART 33 Contesting the Gothic: Fiction, Genre and Cultural Conflict, 1764–1832.

The Caribbean and the Medical Imagination  1764 1834

Significant study of colonial Caribbean literatures in the context of the high rates of disease and death in the region.

New Romantic Cyborgs

This is at least how some people feel at the turn of the century, when in the romantic-gothic imagination it seems ... Medical technologies, for instance, “create” cyborgs in the sense that they often literally merge the biological body ...

New Romantic Cyborgs

An account of the complex relationship between technology and romanticism that links nineteenth-century monsters, automata, and mesmerism with twenty-first-century technology's magic devices and romantic cyborgs.

Fear in the Medical and Literary Imagination Medieval to Modern

Romanticism and the Gothic: Genre, Reception, and Canon Formation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Horn, David G. The Criminal Body: Lombroso and the Anatomy of Deviance. New York: Routledge, 2003. Hume, Robert D. “Gothic ...

Fear in the Medical and Literary Imagination  Medieval to Modern

This book is about an emotion constantly present in human culture and history: fear. It is also a book about literature and medicine, two areas of human endeavour that engage with fear most acutely. The essays in this volume explore fear in various literary and medical manifestations, in the Western World, from medieval to modern times. It is divided into two parts. The first part, Treating Fear, examines fear in medical history, and draws from theology, medicine, philosophy, and psychology, to offer an account of how fear shifts in Western understanding from the Middle Ages to Modern times. The second part, Writing Fear, explores fear as a rhetorical and literary force, offering an account of how it is used and evoked in distinct literary periods and texts. This coherent and fascinating collection will appeal to medical historians, literary critics, cultural theorists, medical humanities’ scholars and historians of the emotions.

The Gothic Imagination

Essays in Dark Romanticism Gary Richard Thompson ... still in the gentle stage of short excursions by balloon , and preventive medicine in this plague - blasted world remains positively Medieval . ... 55 Religious Terror in Gothic Fiction.

The Gothic Imagination


Grim Phantasms

H.P. Lovecraft, Supernatural Horror in Literature (New York: B. Abramson, 1945; rpt., New York: Dover, 1973), p. 53. ... See David E.E. Sloane, “Usher's Nervous Fever: The Meaning of Medicine in Poe's 'The Fall of the House ...

Grim Phantasms

This title, originally published in 1992, presents an assessment of Poe’s short stories that treat horror, and more specifically how he manipulated the conventions of that horror to register subtly on the fears and phobias of his reading audiences. Short-stories examined include The Black Cat, Hop-Frog and Morella. This title also explores the theories of Stephen King and Benjamin Rush on the horror genre. This title will be of great interest to students of American Literature.

Gothic Bodies

An intriguing scholarly investigation, not so much of the ways the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries articulated pain, but of the ways in which pain itself articulated the late eighteenth-century experience.

Gothic Bodies

An intriguing scholarly investigation, not so much of the ways the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries articulated pain, but of the ways in which pain itself articulated the late eighteenth-century experience. Through analysis of novels, plays, and poems, the author explores the transition from sensibility as a sense of "selflessness" to Romanticism, which puts the self in the foreground as the mediating consciousness. His tightly focused discussion sets a starting point for further critical investigation of the subject.

Gothic Bodies

The Politics of Pain in Romantic Fiction Steven Bruhm. imagination often inscribed on the spectacular body concealed all in the very act of display: bodies were violated, but not on stage; these violations were often parodically ...

Gothic Bodies

An intriguing scholarly investigation, not so much of the ways the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries articulated pain, but of the ways in which pain itself articulated the late eighteenth-century experience. Through analysis of novels, plays, and poems, the author explores the transition from sensibility as a sense of "selflessness" to Romanticism, which puts the self in the foreground as the mediating consciousness. His tightly focused discussion sets a starting point for further critical investigation of the subject.

Gothic Feminism

See Jerome McGann, Romantic Ideologies (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983): “Ideas and Ideology therefore lie ... “Introduction: Romanticism and the Gothic Tradition,” in The Gothic Imagination: Essays in Dark Romanticism, ed.

Gothic Feminism

As British women writers in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries sought to define how they experienced their era's social and economic upheaval, they helped popularize a new style of bourgeois female sensibility. Building on her earlier work in Romantic Androgyny, Diane Long Hoeveler now examines the Gothic novels of Charlotte Smith, Ann Radcliffe, Jane Austen, Charlotte Dacre Byrne, Mary Shelley, and the Brontës to show how these writers helped define femininity for women of the British middle class. Hoeveler argues that a female-created literary ideology, now known as "victim feminism," arose as the Gothic novel helped create a new social role of professional victim for women adjusting to the new bourgeois order. These novels were thinly disguised efforts at propagandizing a new form of conduct for women, teaching that "professional femininity"—a cultivated pose of wise passiveness and controlled emotions—best prepared them for social survival. She examines how representations of both men and women in these novels moved from the purely psychosexual into social and political representations, and how these writers constructed a series of ideologies that would allow their female characters—and readers—fictitious mastery over an oppressive social and political system. Gothic Feminism takes a neo-feminist approach to these women's writings, treating them not as sacred texts but as thesis-driven works that attempted to instruct women in a series of strategic poses. It offers both a new understanding of the genre and a wholly new interpretation of feminism as a literary ideology.

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Its legacies included picturesque ideas—in many ways an attempt to harmonize Burke's polarities of the *sublime and the beautiful—and the untameable terrors of the sublime which led to feats of the *Gothic imagination.

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

This reference work provides a broad cultural and historical perspective which presents the aesthetic achievements of great literary figures, their followers and opponents with their counterparts in the field of art, music, design and science.

Romanticism Medicine and the Natural Supernatural

Ed Cameron, The Psychopathology of Gothic Romance: Perversion, Neurosis and Psychosis in Early Works of the Genre ... Thomas Barnes, 'On the Influence of the Imagination, and the Passons, Upon the Understanding', Memoirs of the Literary ...

Romanticism  Medicine and the Natural Supernatural

This fascinating interdisciplinary study examines the relationship between literary interest in visionary kinds of experience and medical ideas about hallucination and the nerves in the first half of the nineteenth century, focusing on canonical Romantic authors, the work of women writers influenced by Romanticism, and visual culture.

The Ashgate Research Companion to Thomas Lovell Beddoes

The Gothic Imagination (Spokane: Washington State University Press, 1974). Tieck, Ludwig,Werke in vier Einzelbänden. ... Vickers, Neil, 'Coleridge, Thomas Beddoes, and Brunonian Medicine',European Romantic Review, 8, 1 (1997), 47–94.

The Ashgate Research Companion to Thomas Lovell Beddoes

Bringing together eminent scholars and emerging critics who offer a range of perspectives and critical methods, this collection sets a new standard in Beddoes criticism. In line with the goals of Ashgate's Research Companion series, the editors and contributors provide an overview of Beddoes's criticism and identify significant new directions in Beddoes studies. These include exploring Beddoes's German context, only recently a site of critical attention; reading Beddoes's plays in light of gender theory; and reassessing Beddoes's use of dramatic genre in the context of recent work by theatre historians. Rounding out the volume are essays devoted to key areas in Beddoes's scholarship such as nineteenth-century medical theories, psychoanalytic myth, and Romantic ventriloquism. This collection makes the case for Beddoes's centrality to contemporary debates about nineteenth-century literary culture and its contexts and his influence on Modernist conceptions of literature.

Literature and Medicine in the Nineteenth Century Periodical Press

... exercises in fiction contrast starkly with the late physician's narrative mastery; health becomes associated with the realist discourse of the case history, and disease with the pathological imagination of Gothic romance.

Literature and Medicine in the Nineteenth Century Periodical Press

In the early nineteenth century, Edinburgh was the leading centre of medical education and research in Britain. It also laid claim to a thriving periodical culture. Literature and Medicine in the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press investigates how Romantic periodicals cultivated innovative literary forms, ideologies and discourses that reflected and shaped medical culture in the nineteenth century. It examines several medically-trained contributors to Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, the most influential literary periodical of the time, and draws upon extensive archival and bibliographical research to reclaim these previously neglected medico-literary figures. Situating their work in relation to developments in medical and periodical culture, Megan Coyer's book advances our understanding of how the nineteenth-century periodical press cross-fertilised medical and literary ideas.