Romanticism and Caricature

Overall, the volume offers important new insights into the relationship between art, satire and politics in a key period of history.

Romanticism and Caricature

Ian Haywood explores the 'Golden Age' of caricature through the close reading of key, iconic prints by artists including James Gillray, George and Robert Cruikshank, and Thomas Rowlandson. This approach both illuminates the visual and ideological complexity of graphic satire and demonstrates how this art form transformed Romantic-era politics into a unique and compelling spectacle of corruption, monstrosity and resistance. New light is cast on major Romantic controversies including the 'revolution debate' of the 1790s, the impact of Thomas Paine's 'infidel' Age of Reason, the introduction of paper money and the resulting explosion of executions for forgery, the propaganda campaign against Napoleon, the revolution in Spain, the Peterloo massacre, the Queen Caroline scandal, and the Reform Bill crisis. Overall, the volume offers important new insights into the relationship between art, satire and politics in a key period of history.

Romanticism and Caricature

6 Romanticism and Caricature paintbrush, or in this case the engraver's needle). Unlike Hone's fallen books, which symbolise the heroic textual world of persecuted radical print culture, caricature inhabits the airy regions of the ...

Romanticism and Caricature

Lively, richly illustrated study of iconic caricatures, showing the interrelationship between art, satire and politics in the Romantic period.

The Rise of Victorian Caricature

In some ways, the book can be considered a sequel to Romanticism and Caricature (2013), which ended its chronological coverage at the Reform Bill and the closure of the Romantic period. This new study continues the story of political ...

The Rise of Victorian Caricature

This book serves as a retrieval and reevaluation of a rich haul of comic caricatures from the turbulent years between the Reform Bill crisis of the early 1830s and the rise and fall of Chartism in the 1840s. With a telling selection of illustrations, this book deploys the techniques of close reading and political contextualization to demonstrate the aesthetic and ideological clout of a neglected tranche of satirical prints and periodicals dismissed as ineffectual by historians or distasteful by contemporaries. The prime exhibits are the work of Robert Seymour and C.J. Grant giving acerbic comic edge to the case for reform against class and state oppression and the excesses of the monarchical regime under the young Queen Victoria.

The Romantic Tavern

Haywood, Romanticism and Caricature, 12–32, 14. George and Stevens, Catalogue, vi: 807–8. For a discussion of satire's self-reflexivity see Haywood, Romanticism and Caricature, 5. Barrell and Mee, Trials for Treason and Sedition, ...

The Romantic Tavern

An examination of taverns in the Romantic period, with a particular focus on architecture and the culture of conviviality.

Spain in British Romanticism

For other examples of this trope in the caricature tradition, see Haywood Romanticism and Caricature 52–53. See Charles Williams, A View of the R-g-t's Bomb (1816). British Museum Satires 12803. See George Cruikshank, The Yorkshireman's ...

Spain in British Romanticism

This collection of thirteen specially commissioned essays by international scholars takes a fresh look at the profound impact of the Peninsular War on Romantic British literature and culture. The expertly authored chapters explore the valorization of Spain by nineteenth-century poets such as Lord Byron, William Wordsworth, Robert Southey, S.T. Coleridge, the Shelleys, and Felicia Hemans in contrast to the Enlightenment-era view of Spain as a backwards nation in decline. Topics discussed include the vision of Spain in Gothic fiction, Spanish experiences of exile as exemplified by the conflict between Valentin de Llanos and Joseph Blanco White, and British women writers' approach to peninsular fiction. Spain in British Romanticism: 1800-1840 is essential reading for scholars and enthusiasts of Romantic literature and Spanish history.

Publications of the Modern Language Association of America

To begin with William Lovell : Professor Francke terms romanticism a caricature of classicism ; but we may speak of a caricature of romanticism , and I think William Lovell is such a caricature . Furthermore , it does not represent ...

Publications of the Modern Language Association of America

Vols. for 1921-1969 include annual bibliography, called 1921-1955, American bibliography; 1956-1963, Annual bibliography; 1964-1968, MLA international bibliography.

The Oxford Handbook of British Romanticism

cartoons of Gillray and Cruikshank.17 The poem reaches for a common and accessible voice which might serve as a popular call to passive resistance. This taxing fusion of visionary and demotic is distinctive of much important writing of ...

The Oxford Handbook of British Romanticism

The Oxford Handbook of British Romanticism offers a comprehensive guide to the literature and thought of the Romantic period, and an overview of the latest research on this topic. Written by a team of international experts, the Handbook analyses all aspects of the Romantic movement, pinpointing its different historical phases and analysing the intellectual and political currents which shaped them. It gives particular attention to devolutionary trends, exploring the English, Scottish, Welsh, and Irish strands in 'British' Romanticism and assessing the impact of the constitutional changes that brought into being the 'United Kingdom' at a time of revolutionary turbulence and international conflict. It also gives extensive coverage to the publishing and reception history of Romantic writing, highlighting the role of readers, reviewers, publishers, and institutions in shaping Romantic literary culture and transmitting its ideas and values. Divided into ten sections, each containing four or five chapters, the Handbook covers key themes and concepts in Romantic studies as well as less chartered topics such as freedom of speech, literature and drugs, Romantic oratory, and literary uses of dialect. All the major male and female Romantic authors are included along with numerous lesser-known writers, the emphasis throughout being on the diversity of Romantic writing and the complexities and internal divisions of the culture that sustained it. The volume strikes a balance between familiarity and novelty to provide an accessible guide to current thinking and a conceptual reorganization of this fast-moving field.

The Oxford Handbook of Eighteenth Century Satire

Shakespearan Allusion in English Caricature in the Age of Gillray, Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institute 49 (1986), 196–210. Bugg, John. Five Long Winters: The Trials of British Romanticism (Stanford: Stanford University Press, ...

The Oxford Handbook of Eighteenth Century Satire

Eighteenth century Britain thought of itself as a polite, sentimental, enlightened place, but often its literature belied this self-image. This was an age of satire, and the century's novels, poems, plays, and prints resound with mockery and laughter, with cruelty and wit. The street-level invective of Grub Street pamphleteers is full of satire, and the same accents of raillery echo through the high scepticism of the period's philosophers and poets, many of whom were part-time pamphleteers themselves. The novel, a genre that emerged during the eighteenth century, was from the beginning shot through with satirical colours borrowed from popular romances and scandal sheets. This Handbook is a guide to the different kinds of satire written in English during the 'long' eighteenth century. It focuses on texts that appeared between the restoration of the Stuart monarchy in 1660 and the outbreak of the French Revolution in 1789. Outlier chapters extend the story back to first decade of the seventeenth century, and forward to the second decade of the nineteenth. The scope of the volume is not confined by genre, however. So prevalent was the satirical mode in writing of the age that this book serves as a broad and characteristic survey of its literature. The Oxford Handbook of Eighteenth-Century Satire reflects developments in historical criticism of eighteenth-century writing over the last two decades, and provides a forum in which the widening diversity of literary, intellectual, and socio-historical approaches to the period's texts can come together.

Picture World

Historians have designated the late eighteenth century as caricature ' s Golden Age , celebrating the densely worked ... 1954 ) , covering the years 1784 to 1832 ; Ian Haywood , Romanticism and Caricature ( Cambridge , UK : Cambridge ...

Picture World

The modern media world came into being in the nineteenth century, when machines were harnessed to produce texts and images in unprecedented numbers. In the visual realm, new industrial techniques generated a deluge of affordable pictorial items, mass-printed photographs, posters, cartoons, and illustrations. These alluring objects of the Victorian parlor were miniaturized spectacles that served as portals onto phantasmagoric versions of 'the world.' Although new kinds of pictures transformed everyday life, these ephemeral items have received remarkably little scholarly attention. Picture World shines a welcome new light onto these critically neglected yet fascinating visual objects. They serve as entryways into the nineteenth century's key aesthetic concepts. Each chapter pairs a new type of picture with a foundational keyword in Victorian aesthetics, a familiar term reconceived through the lens of new media. 'Character' appears differently when considered with caricature, in the new comics and cartoons appearing in the mass press in the 1830s; likewise, the book approaches 'realism' through pictorial journalism; 'illustration' via illustrated Bibles; 'sensation' through carte-de-visite portrait photographs; 'the picturesque' by way of stereoscopic views; and 'decadence' through advertising posters. Picture World studies the aesthetic effects of the nineteenth century's media revolution: it uses the relics of a previous era's cultural life to interrogate the Victorian world's most deeply-held values, arriving at insights still relevant in our own media age.

An Episode of Jewish Romanticism

Baeck , of course , was not out to produce sympathetic interpretations of Schlegel ; but , more to the point , neither was his chief concern to caricature the romantics . The concealed purpose of Baeck's essay is to defend classicism ...

An Episode of Jewish Romanticism

Assesses the impact of romanticism on the thought of Jewish philosopher Franz Rosenzweig.

Romanticism and Illustration

Explores a vital aspect of British Romanticism, the role of illustration in Romantic-era literary texts and visual culture.

Romanticism and Illustration

Explores a vital aspect of British Romanticism, the role of illustration in Romantic-era literary texts and visual culture.

Encyclopedia of the Romantic Era 1760 1850

154 CARICATURE popular culture in a simplified form. Artists then could draw upon the public's knowledge of physiognomy and use it as a code to communicate information about an individual through appearance.

Encyclopedia of the Romantic Era  1760   1850

In 850 analytical articles, this two-volume set explores the developments that influenced the profound changes in thought and sensibility during the second half of the eighteenth century and the first half of the nineteenth century. The Encyclopedia provides readers with a clear, detailed, and accurate reference source on the literature, thought, music, and art of the period, demonstrating the rich interplay of international influences and cross-currents at work; and to explore the many issues raised by the very concepts of Romantic and Romanticism.

The Efflorescence of Caricature 1759 838

over the dangers of novel-reading.48 It also later manifested itself in Romantic literature, especially in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's and Thomas De Quincey's respective experiments with the activity of the mind under narcotics.49 While ...

 The Efflorescence of Caricature  1759 838

Searing disputes over caricature have recently sparked flames across the world?the culmination, not the beginning, of the story of one of modernity's definitive artistic practices. Modern visual satire erupts during a period marked by reform and revolution, by cohering nationalisms and expanding empires, and by the emerging discipline of art history. This has long been recognized as its Golden Age. It is time to look anew. In The Efflorescence of Caricature, 1759-1838, an international, interdisciplinary, and intergenerational team of scholars reconfigures the geography of modern visual satire, as the expansive narrative reaches from North America to Europe, to China and the Ottoman Empire. Caricature's specific visual cultures are also laid bare, its iconographic means and material support, as well as the diverse milieu of its making?the military, the art academy, diplomacy, politics, art criticism, and popular entertainment. Some of its greatest practitioners?James Gillray and Honor?aumier?are seen in a new light, alongside some of their far flung and opportunistic pastichers. Most trenchantly, assumptions about the consequences of caricature's rise come under intense scrutiny, interrogated for its cherished and long-vaunted civilizational claims on individual character, artistic supremacy, political liberty, and global domination.

Satire and Romanticism

I would add that the Romantic-ironic ideal is embodied in both these sources and Don Juan and provides a way to understand ... recipe for producing Aristophanic-pantomimic poetry in the modern age: “magic, caricature, and materialism.

Satire and Romanticism

This remarkable study of the constructive and ultimately canon-forming relationship between satiric and Romantic modes of writing from 1760 to 1832 provides us with a new understanding of the historical development of Romanticism as a literary movement. Romantic poetry is conventionally seen as inward-turning, sentimental, sublime, and transcendent, whereas satire, with its public, profane, and topical rhetoric, is commonly cast in the role of generic other as the un-Romantic mode. This book argues instead that the two modes mutually defined each other and were subtly interwoven during the Romantic period. By rearranging reputations, changing aesthetic assumptions, and re-distributing cultural capital, the interaction of satiric and Romantic modes helped make possible the Victorian and modern construction of 'English Romanticism'.

The Portrait in Fiction of the Romantic Period

caricature. This chapter focuses on a branch of art which bears a close, if often troubled, relationship to portraiture. Like the portrait, the caricature became increasingly ubiquitous in the second half of the eighteenth century.

The Portrait in Fiction of the Romantic Period

Beginning with the premise that the portrait was undergoing a shift in both form and function during the Romantic age, Joe Bray examines how these changes are reflected in the fiction of writers such as Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen, Sir Walter Scott, Elizabeth Hamilton and Amelia Opie. Bray considers portraiture in a broad sense as encompassing caricature and the miniature, as well as the classic portraits of Sir Joshua Reynolds and others. He argues that the portrait in fiction often functions not as a transparent index to character or as a means of producing a straightforward likeness, but rather as a cue for misreading and a sign of the slipperiness and subjectivity of interpretation. The book is concerned with more than simply the appearance of portraits in Romantic fiction, however. More broadly, The Portrait in Fiction of the Romantic Period investigates how the language of portraiture pervades the novel in this period and how the two art forms exert mutual stylistic influence on each other.

Balzac Grandville and the Rise of Book Illustration

So too is it representative of Balzac's aesthetics of caricature and satire, which stand in opposition to Lamartine's Méditations and Hugo's Odes (1822). According to Balzac, Romanticism—like its literary production—is sick and dying.

Balzac  Grandville  and the Rise of Book Illustration

Examining how the rise of book illustration affected the historic hegemony of the word, Keri Yousif explores the complex literary and artistic relationship between the novelist Honoré de Balzac and the illustrator J. J. Grandville during the French July Monarchy (1830-1848). Both collaborators and rivals, these towering figures struggled for dominance in the Parisian book trade at the height of the Romantic revolution and its immediate aftermath. Both men were social portraitists who collaborated on the influential encyclopedic portrayal of nineteenth-century society, Les Français peints par eux-mêmes. However, their collaboration soon turned competitive with Grandville's publication of Scènes de la vie privée et publique des animaux, a visual parody of Balzac's Scènes de la vie privée. Yousif investigates Balzac's and Grandville's individual and joint artistic productions in terms of the larger economic and aesthetic struggles within the nineteenth-century arena of cultural production, showing how writers were forced to position themselves both in terms of the established literary hierarchy and in relation to the rapidly advancing image. As Yousif shows, the industrialization of the illustrated book spawned a triadic relationship between publisher, writer, and illustrator that transformed the book from a product of individual genius to a cooperative and commercial affair. Her study represents a significant contribution to our understanding of literature, art, and their interactions in a new marketplace for publication during the fraught transition from Romanticism to Realism.

The Romantic Conception of Life

The Historical Meaning of Naturphilosophie and Romantic Biology To demonstrate the accuracy of Goethe's own avowal of ... they rely on cultural assumptions and unanchored intuitions — a caricature of the Romantic approach itself.12 Most ...

The Romantic Conception of Life

"All art should become science and all science art; poetry and philosophy should be made one." Friedrich Schlegel's words perfectly capture the project of the German Romantics, who believed that the aesthetic approaches of art and literature could reveal patterns and meaning in nature that couldn't be uncovered through rationalistic philosophy and science alone. In this wide-ranging work, Robert J. Richards shows how the Romantic conception of the world influenced (and was influenced by) both the lives of the people who held it and the development of nineteenth-century science. Integrating Romantic literature, science, and philosophy with an intimate knowledge of the individuals involved—from Goethe and the brothers Schlegel to Humboldt and Friedrich and Caroline Schelling—Richards demonstrates how their tempestuous lives shaped their ideas as profoundly as their intellectual and cultural heritage. He focuses especially on how Romantic concepts of the self, as well as aesthetic and moral considerations—all tempered by personal relationships—altered scientific representations of nature. Although historians have long considered Romanticism at best a minor tributary to scientific thought, Richards moves it to the center of the main currents of nineteenth-century biology, culminating in the conception of nature that underlies Darwin's evolutionary theory. Uniting the personal and poetic aspects of philosophy and science in a way that the German Romantics themselves would have honored, The Romantic Conception of Life alters how we look at Romanticism and nineteenth-century biology.

Key Concepts in Romantic Literature

The caricature of the Romantic poet as someone purely concerned with poetry and the creative imagination has been put under relentless question and the spirit of H. W. Garrod has triumphed over those of Hough and Brooke.

Key Concepts in Romantic Literature

Key Concepts in Romantic Literature is an accessible and easy-to-use scholarly guide to the literature, criticism and history of the culturally rich and politically turbulent Romantic era (1789-1832). The book offers a comprehensive and critically up-to-date account of the fascinating poetry, novels and drama which characterized the Romantic period alongside an historically-informed account of the important social, political and aesthetic contexts which shaped that body of writing. The epochal poetry of William Wordsworth, William Blake, Mary Robinson, S. T. Coleridge, Charlotte Smith, P. B. Shelley, Lord Byron, John Keats, Felicia Hemans and Letitia Elizabeth Landon; the drama of Joanna Baillie and Charles Robert Maturin; the novels of Jane Austen and Mary Shelley; all of these figures and many more are insightfully discussed here, together with clear and helpful accounts of the key contexts of the age's literature (including the French Revolution, slavery, industrialisation, empire and the rise of feminism) as well as accounts of perhaps less familiar aspects of late Georgian culture (such as visionary spirituality, atheism, gambling, fashion, music and sport). This is the broadest guide available to late eighteenth and early 19th century British and Irish literature, history and culture.

Lessons of Romanticism

8 See Diana Donald , " Characters and Caricatures " 366 . 9 See A Satirical View of London 149-50 : " The humourous mode of satirizing folly is very prejudicial to the multitude in many respects ; —in the loss of time to those who stop ...

Lessons of Romanticism

Explores how the Romantic period gave birth to a seductive cognitive cultural program that retains far reaching implications for contemporary views on individuality and relationships between the individual and larger groups of identification. Established

Romanticism and Form

Pictorial traditions tend to survive more pervasively in popular art forms like caricature than in almost any other kind of art. Emblem books as well as the hieroglyph and the heraldic device became a standard part of the visual ...

Romanticism and Form

This book offers new analyzes of canonical texts, contextualizations of Romantic forms in relation to war, nationalism and empire, reassessments of neglected and marginalized writers and explorations of the relationship between form and reader. It showcases a range of new approaches that are informed by deconstruction, theology and new technology.