Root to Stem

A seasonal guide to natural recipes and remedies for everyday life

Root to Stem

'Root to Stem is a seasonal and holistic approach to health that puts plants, herbs and nature at the heart of how we live and eat. It is a new kind of guide that links individual health to our communities and the planet's health to sustain us all.' This perfect companion to the seasons, this book will show you how to take greater control over your own health and well-being, treat everyday ailments, and ensure the sustainability of the planet through discovering how to forage, grow, or shop for plant- and herb-based foods and products. Including: Detox in the spring with sorrel, cleavers and nettles. Harvest summer lime leaf shoots to soothe digestive upsets and feed gut microbes. Bake a Lammas loaf to celebrate the autumnal equinox. Boost your winter immunity with red berries, purple potatoes and rosehips. Root-to-stem eating encourages you to use every edible part of plant, including the leaves, skin, seeds and stalks. Travelling through the four seasons, expert medical herbalist Alex Laird shares the natural ingredients that are available on your doorstep, simple delicious recipes and easy-to-make herbal remedies.

Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower

How to Cook with Vegetables and Other Plants

Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower

Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower is a cookbook about plants – it's about making the most of the land's bounty in your everyday cooking. Making small changes to the way we cook and eat can both lessen the impact we have on the environment and dramatically improve our health and wellbeing: good for us and for future generations to come. Making plants and vegetables the focus of your meals can improve your cooking exponentially - they provide a feast of flavours, colours and textures.Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower is a true celebration of seasonal vegetables and fruit, packed with simple and surprisingly quick vegetarian recipes. With roots, we think of the crunch of carrots, celeriac, beetroot. From springtime stems like our beloved asparagus and rhubarb, through leaves of every hue (kale, radicchio, chard), when the blossoms become the fruits of autumn – apples, pears, plums – the food year is marked by growth, ripening and harvest. With 120 original recipes, every dish captured by acclaimed photographer Andrew Montgomery, and Gill's ideas for using the very best fresh ingredients, Root, Stem, Leaf, Flower is a thoughtful, inspiring collection of recipes that you'll want to come back to again and again. Praise for Time: "I love Gill Meller's food: it is completely his own, and ranges from the (unpretentiously) rarified to the smile-inducingly cosy; indeed, he often seems to fuse the two... his recipes make me want to run headlong into the kitchen." Nigella Lawson "Gill Meller's latest cookbook, Time, is poetic and romantic – a string of beautiful recipes guide you through the seasons." Yotam Ottolenghi, GuardianPraise for Gather: "My book of the autumn and possibly of the year... Gather is a perfect expression of something food writers have been trying to define for the past three decades: modern British cooking." Diana Henry "Just stunning. There's no one I'd rather cook for me than Gill and there's not a recipe here I wouldn't eagerly devour." Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall

Molecular Genetics of Plant-Microbe Interactions

Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on the Molecular Genetics of Plant-Microbe Associations, Montréal, Québec, Canada, July 27–31, 1986

Molecular Genetics of Plant-Microbe Interactions

Increased interest in the basic biology of plants and microorganisms stems from the fact that crop productivity is directly affected by plant-microbe interactions. In spite of the fact that plants exist in the environment amongst diverse species of microorganisms, only a few ever establish a direct relationship. Emerging awareness concerning the indirect effect of microbial association on plant growth and the possibility of using one microbe against another for controlling pathogenic interactions is at the genesis of new fields of studies. The primary reason for a microbe to associate with· photoautotrophic organisms (plants) is to tap its nutritional requirements, fixed carbon, as a source of energy. By hook or by crook, a microbe must survive. Some have evolved mechanisms to exploit plants to develop a niche for their biotropic demands. When in contact with a living plant, microorganisms may live in a passive association using exudates from the plant, invade it pathogenically or coexist with it in symbiosis. The plant responds to the interloper, either reacting in a hypersensitive manner to contain the invasion of pathogens, or by inducing a set of genes that leads toward symbiosis, or by simply succumbing to the invader. Thus, prior to contact wi th the plant, mic roorganism is able to sense the presence of the host and activate accordingly a set of genes required for the forthcoming interaction, whether symbiotic or pathogenic.

Cassava

Biology, Production and Utilization

Cassava

Cassava is a major tropical tuber crop found throughout the tropics (India, Oceania, Africa and Latin America). Hitherto, there has been no single text covering all aspects of cassava biology, production and utilization. This book fills that gap, representing the first comprehensive research level overview of this main staple crop. Chapters are written by leading experts in this field from all continents. The book is suitable for those working and researching in cassava, in both developed and developing countries, as well as advanced students.

Uchumataqu

The Lost Language of the Urus of Bolivia ; a Grammatical Description of the Language as Documented Between 1894 and 1952

Uchumataqu

This book is the first comprehensive grammatical description of Uchumataqu, the language of the Uru of Lake Titicaca in north-western Bolivia. Uchumataqu forms part of the isolated language family Uru-Chipaya but has been influenced to differing degrees by Aymara, Quechua, and Spanish. The Uchumataqu language became extinct around 1950. Although several researchers had documented the language during the first half of the twentieth century, much of the material remained unstudied. This book is the first to take into consideration every previous study of the Uchumataqu language. The grammatical description is based on former publications and archive material and seeks to describe Uchumataqu as comprehensively as possible. It includes a description of the phonological system of Uchumataqu as well as a presentation of its morphological processes. The nominal and verbal systems are discussed in detail. Particular attention is paid to the complex person-marking system of Uchumataqu, of which person-marking clitics are a vital part that distinguishes Uchumataqu from the neighbouring Aymara and Quechua language. Another important issue are nominalisation and subordination strategies as well as adjectives which form a word class of its own. The relationship of Uchumataqu with the surrounding Aymara and Quechua language, and particularly the way in which influence on Uchumataqu was exerted, are described in detail. The appendices contain a transcription of the afore unpublished manuscripts of Max Uhle and Walter Lehmann on Uchumataqu as well as a comparative and diachronic dictionary. This book is aimed at linguists from all disciplines but is of equal interest to anthropologists, Americanists, historical linguists, typologists, and linguists with a special interest in Andean studies. It is not only an important contribution to the study of Andean languages and their interrelationship, but also an account for the descendants of the last Uchumataqu speakers of their lost language.