Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory

The past several decades have seen an explosion of interest in narrative, with this multifaceted object of inquiry becoming a central concern in a wide range of disciplinary fields and research contexts.

Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory

The past several decades have seen an explosion of interest in narrative, with this multifaceted object of inquiry becoming a central concern in a wide range of disciplinary fields and research contexts. As accounts of what happened to particular people in particular circumstances and with specific consequences, stories have come to be viewed as a basic human strategy for coming to terms with time, process, and change. However, the very predominance of narrative as a focus of interest across multiple disciplines makes it imperative for scholars, teachers, and students to have access to a comprehensive reference resource.

Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory

Arranged in an A-Z format, this is a comprehensive reference resource for scholars, teachers, and students of narrative theory.

Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory

Arranged in an A-Z format, this is a comprehensive reference resource for scholars, teachers, and students of narrative theory.

Basic Elements of Narrative

The concise, up-to-date treatment of foundational concepts also makes this book an ideal reference for scholars in the field.

Basic Elements of Narrative

Basic Elements of Narrative outlines a way of thinking about what narrative is and how to identify its basic elements across various media, introducing key concepts developed by previous theorists and contributing original ideas to the growing body of scholarship on stories. Includes an overview of recent developments in narrative scholarship Provides an accessible introduction to key concepts in the field Views narrative as a cognitive structure, type of text, and resource for interpersonal communication Uses examples from literature, face to face interaction, graphic novels, and film to explore the core features of narrative Includes a glossary of key terms, full bibliography, and comprehensive index Appropriate for multiple audiences, including students, non-specialists, and experts in the field

Unnatural Narratives Unnatural Narratology

For the first time, this collection of essays presents and discusses the new analytical tools that have so far been developed on the basis of unnatural novels, short stories, and plays and extends these findings through analyses of ...

Unnatural Narratives   Unnatural Narratology

In recent years, the study of unnatural narratives has become an exciting new but still disparate research program in narrative theory. For the first time, this collection of essays presents and discusses the new analytical tools that have so far been developed on the basis of unnatural novels, short stories, and plays and extends these findings through analyses of testimonies, comics, graphic novels, films, and oral narratives. Many narratives do not only mimetically reproduce the world as we know it but confront us with strange narrative worlds which rely on principles that have very little to do with the actual world around us. The essays in this collection develop new narratological tools and modeling systems which are designed to capture the strangeness and extravagance of such anti-realist narratives. Taken together, the essays offer a systematic investigation of anti-mimetic techniques and strategies that relate to different narrative parameters, different media, and different periods within literary history.

Phantom Sentences

Sylvie PATRON University of Paris VII – Denis Diderot On the Epistemology of Narrative Theory : Narratology and ... On this point , the Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory , which has just come out , constitutes an exception .

Phantom Sentences

Ann Banfield - professor in the Department of English at the University of California, Berkeley - is best known for her groundbreaking contributions to narrative theory. Working within the paradigm of generative linguistics, she argued that the language of fiction is characterized by two «unspeakable sentences», i.e., sentences that do not properly occur in the spoken language: the sentence of «pure narration» and the sentence of «represented speech and thought» (style indirect libre or erlebte Rede). More recently, Banfield offered a major reconsideration of the novels of Virginia Woolf and modernism in light of the philosophy of knowledge developed by G. E. Moore and Bertrand Russell, and appropriated by Roger Fry in his critical analyses of impressionism and post-impressionism. The essays gathered here pay tribute to Banfield by addressing those disciplines and topics most closely related to her work, including: narrative theory and pragmatics, the philosophy of language and knowledge, generative syntax, meter and phonology, and modernism.

Style and Rhetoric of Short Narrative Fiction

In this volume, Dan Shen systematically investigates how stylistic analysis is indispensable for uncovering this covert progression through rhetorical narrative criticism.

Style and Rhetoric of Short Narrative Fiction

In many fictional narratives, the progression of the plot exists in tension with a very different and powerful dynamic that runs, at a hidden and deeper level, throughout the text. In this volume, Dan Shen systematically investigates how stylistic analysis is indispensable for uncovering this covert progression through rhetorical narrative criticism. The book brings to light the covert progressions in works by the American writers Edgar Allan Poe, Stephan Crane and Kate Chopin and British writer Katherine Mansfield.

Analyzing Social Narratives

In Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory, edited by David Herman, Jahn Manfred, and Marie-Laure Ryan, 157. New York: Routledge. Herman, David. 2005b. “Sjuzhet.” In Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory , edited by David Herman ...

Analyzing Social Narratives

Interpreting human stories, whether those told by individuals, groups, organizations, nations, or even civilizations, opens a wide scope of research options for understanding how people construct, shape, and reshape their perceptions, identities, and beliefs. Such narrative research is a rapidly growing field in the social sciences, as well as in the societally oriented humanities, such as cultural studies. This methodologically framed book offers conceptual directions for the study of social narrative, guiding readers through the means of narrative research and raising important ethical and value-related dilemmas. Shenhav details three classic elements of narrative—text, story, and narration—familiar concepts to those in literary studies. To the classic trilolgy of terms, this book also adds multiplicity, a crucial element for applying narrative analysis to the social sciences as it rests on the understanding that social narratives seek reproduction and self-multiplicity in order to become "social" and influential. The aim of this book is to create an easy, clear, and welcoming introduction to narratology as a mode of analysis, especially designed for students of the social sciences to provide the basics of a narratological approach, and to help make research and writing in this tradition more systematic. .

Narrative Factuality

Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory. Eds. David Herman et al. London and New York: Routledge, 2005. 467–468. Ochs, Elinor, and Lisa Capps. Living Narrative: Creating Lives in Everyday Storytelling.

Narrative Factuality

The study of narrative—the object of the rapidly growing discipline of narratology—has been traditionally concerned with the fictional narratives of literature, such as novels or short stories. But narrative is a transdisciplinary and transmedial concept whose manifestations encompass both the fictional and the factual. In this volume, which provides a companion piece to Tobias Klauk and Tilmann Köppe’s Fiktionalität: Ein interdisziplinäres Handbuch, the use of narrative to convey true and reliable information is systematically explored across media, cultures and disciplines, as well as in its narratological, stylistic, philosophical, and rhetorical dimensions. At a time when the notion of truth has come under attack, it is imperative to reaffirm the commitment to facts of certain types of narrative, and to examine critically the foundations of this commitment. But because it takes a background for a figure to emerge clearly, this book will also explore nonfactual types of narratives, thereby providing insights into the nature of narrative fiction that could not be reached from the narrowly literary perspective of early narratology.

Narrative Theory

Hale, Dorothy J. Social Formalism: The Novel in Theory from Henry James to the Present. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998. Halliwell, Stephen. ... “Action Theory,” in Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory.

Narrative Theory

Narrative Theory offers an introduction to the field's critical and philosophical approaches towards narrative throughout history.

Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies

Herman, D., M. Jahn and M.-L. Ryan (eds) (2010) Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory, London & New York: Routledge. A key reference resource for researchers interested in both literary and sociological conceptualizations of ...

Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies remains the most authoritative reference work for students and scholars interested in engaging with the phenomenon of translation in all its modes and in relation to a wide range of theoretical and methodological traditions. This new edition provides a considerably expanded and updated revision of what appeared as Part I in the first and second editions. Featuring 132 as opposed to the 75 entries in Part I of the second edition, it offers authoritative, critical overviews of additional topics such as authorship, canonization, conquest, cosmopolitanism, crowdsourced translation, dubbing, fan audiovisual translation, genetic criticism, healthcare interpreting, hybridity, intersectionality, legal interpreting, media interpreting, memory, multimodality, nonprofessional interpreting, note-taking, orientalism, paratexts, thick translation, war and world literature. Each entry ends with a set of annotated references for further reading. Entries no longer appearing in this edition, including historical overviews that previously appeared as Part II, are now available online via the Routledge Translation Studies Portal. Designed to support critical reflection, teaching and research within as well as beyond the field of translation studies, this is an invaluable resource for students and scholars of translation, interpreting, literary theory and social theory, among other disciplines.

Narrative Theory Literature and New Media

“Narrative Comprehension.” In Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory, edited by David Herman, Manfred Jahn, and Marie-Laure Ryan, 351–52. London: Routledge. Fokkelman, J. P. 1993. Narrative Art and Poetry in the Books of Samuel: A ...

Narrative Theory  Literature  and New Media

Offering an interdisciplinary approach to narrative, this book investigates storyworlds and minds in narratives across media, from literature to digital games and reality TV, from online sadomasochism to oral history databases, and from horror to hallucinations. It addresses two core questions of contemporary narrative theory, inspired by recent cognitive-scientific developments: what kind of a construction is a storyworld, and what kind of mental functioning can be embedded in it? Minds and worlds become essential facets of making sense and interpreting narratives as the book asks how story-internal minds relate to the mind external to the storyworld, that is, the mind processing the story. With essays from social scientists, literary scholars, linguists, and scholars from interactive media studies answering these topical questions, the collection brings diverse disciplines into dialogue, providing new openings for genuinely transdisciplinary narrative theory. The wide-ranging selection of materials analyzed in the book promotes knowledge on the latest forms of cultural and social meaning-making through narrative, necessary for navigating the contemporary, mediatized cultural landscape. The combination of theoretical reflection and empirical analysis makes this book an invaluable resource for scholars and advanced students in fields including literary studies, social sciences, art, media, and communication.

Intermediality and Storytelling

Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory. London and New York: Routledge, 205–207. Messaris, Paul (1997). Visual Persuasion: the role of images in advertising. London: Sage. Myers, Greg (1994). Words in Ads. London: Edward Arnold.

Intermediality and Storytelling

Extending narratological analysis to media as varied as graphic novels, photography, television, musicals, computer games and advertising, the essays gathered in this volume address some of the most fundamental questions raised by the medial turn in narratology: how can narrative meaning be created in media other than language; how do different types of signs collaborate with each other in so-called multimodal works; and what new forms of narrativity are made possible by the emergence of digital media."

Music and Levels of Narration in Film

Herman, David (2005), 'Storyworld', in David Herman, Manfred Jahn and Marie-Laure Ryan (eds), Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory, New York & Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 569–70. Herman, David, Jahn, Manfred and Ryan, Marie-Laure ...

Music and Levels of Narration in Film

This is the first book-length study of the narratology of film music, and an indispensable resource for anyone researching or studying film music or film narratology. It surveys the so far piecemeal discussion of narratological concepts in film music studies, and tries to (cautiously) systematize them, and to expand and refine them with reference to ideas from general narratology and film narratology (including contributions from German-language literature less widely known in Anglophone scholarship). The book goes beyond the current focus of film music studies on the distinction between diegetic and nondiegetic music (music understood to be or not to be part of the storyworld of a film), and takes into account different levels of narration: from the extrafictional to ‘focalizations’ of subjectivity, and music’s many and complex movements between them. The conceptual toolkit proposed in the first part of the book is put to the text in a series of case studies: of numbers in film musicals; of music and sound in horror films; and of music and narrative structures in, among others, films by Sergio Leone, The Truman Show, Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Far from Heaven.

Unnatural Narrative

A talking body part, a character that is simultaneously alive and dead, a shape-changing setting, or time travel: although impossible in the real world, such narrative elements do appear in the storyworlds of novels, short stories, and ...

Unnatural Narrative

A talking body part, a character that is simultaneously alive and dead, a shape-changing setting, or time travel: although impossible in the real world, such narrative elements do appear in the storyworlds of novels, short stories, and plays. Impossibilities of narrator, character, time, and space are not only common in today's world of postmodernist literature but can also be found throughout the history of literature. Examples include the beast fable, the heroic epic, the romance, the eighteenth-century circulation novel, the Gothic novel, the ghost play, the fantasy narrative, and the science-fiction novel, among others. Unnatural Narrative looks at the startling and persistent presence of the impossible or "the unnatural" throughout British and American literary history. Layering the lenses of cognitive narratology, frame theory, and possible-worlds theory, Unnatural Narrative offers a rigorous and engaging new characterization of the unnatural and what it yields for individual readers as well as literary culture. Jan Alber demonstrates compelling interpretations of the unnatural in literature and shows the ways in which such unnatural phenomena become conventional in readers' minds, altogether expanding our sense of the imaginable and informing new structures and genres of narrative engagement.

Translation and Conflict

Translation and Conflict was the first book to demonstrate that translators and interpreters participate in circulating as well as resisting the narratives that create the intellectual and moral environment for violent conflict and social ...

Translation and Conflict

Translation and Conflict was the first book to demonstrate that translators and interpreters participate in circulating as well as resisting the narratives that create the intellectual and moral environment for violent conflict and social tensions. Drawing on narrative theory and with numerous examples from historical and current contexts of conflict, Mona Baker provides an original and coherent model of analysis that pays equal attention to the circulation of narratives in translation and to questions of dominance and resistance. With a new preface by Sue-Ann Harding, Translation and Conflict is more than ever the essential text for any student or researcher interested in the study of translation and social movements.

Narrative concepts in the study of Eighteenth Century literature

Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory: pp. 491-92. Palmer, Alan. 2005b. 'Thought and Consciousness Representation (Literature)'. Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory, ed. by David Herman, Manfred Jahn, and Marie-Laure Ryan.

Narrative concepts in the study of Eighteenth Century literature

This collection of essays studies the encounter between allegedly ahistorical concepts of narratology and eighteenth-century literature. It questions whether the general concepts of narratology are as such applicable to historically specific fields, or whether they need further specification. Furthermore, at issue is the question whether the theoretical concepts actually are, despite their appearance of ahistorical generality, derived from the historical study of a particular period and type of literature. In the essays such concepts as genre, plot, character, event, tellability, perspective, temporality, description, reading, metadiegetic narration, and paratext are scrutinized in the context of eighteenth-century texts. The writers include some of the leading theorists of both narratology and eighteenth-century literature.

Handbook of Narratology

The Routledge Encyclopedia of Narrative Theory. London: Routledge, 599–600. Currie, Mark (1998). Postmodern Narrative Theory. London: Macmillian. Danto, Arthur C. (1965). Analytical Philosophy of History. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.

Handbook of Narratology

This handbook provides a systematic overview of the present state of international research in narratology and is now available in a second, completely revised and expanded edition.Detailed individual studies by internationally renowned narratologists elucidate central terms of narratology, present a critical account of the major research positions and their historical development and indicate directions for future research.

The Routledge Handbook of English Language and Digital Humanities

In D. Herman, M. Jahn and M.-L. Ryan (eds.), Routledge encyclopedia of narrative theory. London: Routledge. Adami, E. (2017). Multimodality. In The Oxford handbook of language and society. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Aristotle.

The Routledge Handbook of English Language and Digital Humanities

The Routledge Handbook of English Language and Digital Humanities serves as a reference point for key developments related to the ways in which the digital turn has shaped the study of the English language and of how the resulting methodological approaches have permeated other disciplines. It draws on modern linguistics and discourse analysis for its analytical methods and applies these approaches to the exploration and theorisation of issues within the humanities. Divided into three sections, this handbook covers: sources and corpora; analytical approaches; English language at the interface with other areas of research in the digital humanities. In covering these areas, more traditional approaches and methodologies in the humanities are recast and research challenges are re-framed through the lens of the digital. The essays in this volume highlight the opportunities for new questions to be asked and long-standing questions to be reconsidered when drawing on the digital in humanities research. This is a ground-breaking collection of essays offering incisive and essential reading for anyone with an interest in the English language and digital humanities.

A Multimodal Perspective on Applied Storytelling Performances

In: D. Herman, M. Jahn and M. Ryan, eds., Routledge encyclopedia of narrative theory. London: Routledge, pp. 388– 392. Polanyi, L. (1985). Telling the American story: A structural and cultural analysis of conversational storytelling.

A Multimodal Perspective on Applied Storytelling Performances

In this volume, Soe Marlar Lwin proposes a contextualized multimodal framework that brings together storytelling practitioners’ and academic researchers’ conceptions of storytelling. It aims to highlight the ways in which various institutions in contemporary society have been using live storytelling performances as an effective communicative, educative and meaning-making tool. Drawing on theories of narrative from narratology as well as from related fields such as discourse analysis, multimodal analysis, communication and performance studies, the author proposes a contextualized multimodal framework to (a) uncover the potential narrativity of a live storytelling performance through an analysis of narrative elements constituting the story, (b) capture the process of developing actual narrativity through a multimodal analysis of performance features in the storytelling discourse, and (c) highlight the importance of context and dynamics between the storyteller and audience for an achievement of optimal narrativity in a particular storytelling event. The sample analysis shows how the framework not only describes the system governing institutionalized storytelling performances in general but also serves as a useful model to examine individual performance as a unique realization of the general system. The book also offers implications for possible applications of such contextualized multimodal frameworks more broadly across the disciplines.