R U R and The Insect Play

Josef and Karel Capek were the best known literary figures of liberated Czechoslovakia after 1918.

R U R  and The Insect Play

Josef and Karel Capek were the best known literary figures of liberated Czechoslovakia after 1918. After the success of R.U.R. (Rossums' Universal Robots, 1920), the brothers collaborated in their best-known work, The Insect Play (1921). Both plays are satires depicting the horrors of a regimented technical world and the terrible end of the populace if they fail to rise against their oppressors. They reflect the world in which the Capeks lived and give a commentary on its grosser follies.

Capek Four Plays

"There was no writer like him. . . prophetic assurance mixed with surrealistic humour and hard-edged social satire: a unique combination" (Arthur Miller) This volume brings together fresh new translations of four of his most popular plays, ...

Capek Four Plays

"There was no writer like him. . . prophetic assurance mixed with surrealistic humour and hard-edged social satire: a unique combination" (Arthur Miller) This volume brings together fresh new translations of four of his most popular plays, more than ever relevant today. In R. U. R., the Robot - an idea Çapek was the first to invent - gradually takes over all aspects of human existence except procreation; The Insect Play is a satirical fable in which beetles, butterflies and ants give dramatic form to different philosophies of life; The Makropulos Case is a fantasy about human mortality, finally celebrating the average lifespan; The White Plague is a savage and anguished satire against fascist dictatorship and the virus of inhumanity.

Cultural Convergence

Review of Karel Capek,ˇ R.U.R. at the Gate Theatre, Dublin. Evening Mail, 23 September. Capek,ˇ Josef, and Karel Capek.ˇ 1961. R.U.R. and The Insect Play. Trans. Paul Selver. Adapted by Nigel Playfair (R.U.R.) and Nigel Playfair and ...

Cultural Convergence

Based on extensive archival research, this open access book examines the poetics and politics of the Dublin Gate Theatre (est. 1928) over the first three decades of its existence, discussing some of its remarkable productions in the comparative contexts of avant-garde theatre, Hollywood cinema, popular culture, and the development of Irish-language theatre, respectively. The overarching objective is to consider the output of the Gate in terms of cultural convergence the dynamics of exchange, interaction, and acculturation that reveal the workings of transnational infrastructures.

R U R

Must-read play looks to a future in which all workers are automatons. They revolt when they acquire souls (i.e., when they gain the ability to hate) and the resulting catastrophe make for a powerful theatrical experience.

R U R

Must-read play looks to a future in which all workers are automatons. They revolt when they acquire souls (i.e., when they gain the ability to hate) and the resulting catastrophe make for a powerful theatrical experience.

Theological Interpretation of Culture in Post Communist Context

9Karel Čapek, R.U.R. and The Insect Play, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1961, 91. 10This gave modern languages the neologism 'robot' – an artificial slave that has some outer human features but no human emotions, human care or ...

Theological Interpretation of Culture in Post Communist Context

Twenty years after the fall of Communism in Central and East Europe is an ocassion to reevaluate the cultural and theological contribution from that region to the secularization - post-secularization debate. Czech theologian Ivana Noble develops a Trinitarian theology through a close dialogue with literature, music and film, which formed not only alternatives to totalitarian ideologies, but also followed the loss and reappeareance of belief in God. Noble explains that, by listening to the artists, the churches and theologians can deal with questions about the nature of the world, memory and ultimate fulfilment in a more nuanced way. Then, as partakers in the search undertaken by their secular and post-secular contemporaries, theologians can penetrate a new depth of meaning, sending out shoots from the stump of Christian symbolism. Drawing on the rich cultures of Central and East Europe and both Western and Eastern theological traditions, this book presents a theological reading of contemporary culture which is important not just for post-Communist countries but for all who are engaged in the debate on the boundaries between theology, politics and arts.

Encyclopedia of Literary Translation Into English A L

... New York : Samuel French , 1933 ; as The Life of the Insects in International Modern Plays , edited by Anthony Dent , London : Dent , and New York : Dutton , 1950 ; as The Insect Play , with R.U.R. , London : Oxford University Press ...

Encyclopedia of Literary Translation Into English  A L

Includes articles about translations of the works of specific authors and also more general topics pertaining to literary translation.

Highbrow lowdown

John Corbin, “The Play: A Czecho-Slovak Frankenstein,” New York Times, 10 October 1922, 24; Karel Cóapek, R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots), trans. and adapted P. Selver and Nigel Playfair, in the Brothers Cóapek, R.U.R. and The Insect ...

Highbrow lowdown

Highbrow/Lowdown explores the twentieth century's first culture war and the forces that permanently transformed American theater into the art form we know today. The arrival of jazz in the 1920s sparked a cultural revolution that was impossible to contain. The music affected every stratum of U.S. society and culture, confusing and challenging long-entrenched hierarchies based on class, race, and ethnicity. Jazz was considered the first distinctively American art form, and its dissemination across the globe served to launch the United States as a cultural force to be reckoned with. The Jazz Age was also the era of vaudeville, burlesque, and musical comedy, popular entertainments that were quick to cash in on the jazz craze. But jazz was much more than the music. It was also a powerful cultural force that brought African American, Jewish, and working-class culture into the white Protestant mainstream. When the influence of jazz spread to legitimate theater, playwrights, producers, and critics rushed to distinguish the newly emerging literary theater from its illegitimate cousins. The efforts to defeat the democratizing influences of jazz and to canonize playwrights like Eugene O'Neill triumphed, giving birth to American theater as we know it today. David Savran is Distinguished Professor of Theatre and Vera Mowry Roberts Chair in American Theatre at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. "An important book that raises crucial questions about how and why a literary 'art theatre' came to be seen among tastemakers and canonizers as 'legitimate.' Savran makes the persuasive argument that jazz needed to be defeated in order for the art theatre to take center stage, using an impressive variety of tools to make his case." ---Andrea Most, University of Toronto "Like a canny fight promoter in the perennial American culture wars, David Savran puts the reader ringside for a blow-by-blow account of the Battle of the Brows---high, middle, and low. Setting Jazz Age entertainments at one another, with 'legitimate theater' duking it out with nightclub revues and movies pummeling vaudeville, Highbrow/Lowdown tracks the rise of heavyweight Eugene O'Neill to the top of the card, but it also makes heroes of the referees---the drama critics and audiences who crowned the winners. This is performance history as an innovative 'political economy of culture,' and it's a knockout." ---Joseph Roach, Yale University "A stunningly original analysis of music and theater in the 1920s as inseparable faces of jazz. Savran grounds his social history on a huge array of primary sources while drawing, without fanfare or jargon, on theorists such as Adorno and Bourdieu. His musical analyses of Gershwin, John Alden Carpenter, and George Antheil are not just first class but pathbreaking. No student of jazz as a Western cultural phenomenon---or of any American music or theater in the 1920s---will dare miss this powerfully illuminating, unabashedly reliable, beautifully written book." ---Rose Rosengard Subotnik, Brown University

Literature Culture and Society

(1961) R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots). A Play in Three Acts and an Epilogue, trans. P. Selver, in The Brothers Čapek, R.U.R. and The Insect Play, Oxford: Oxford University Press. ——— (1966) R.U.R. Rossum's Universal Robots.

Literature  Culture and Society

As cultural studies has grown from its origins on the margins of literary studies, it has tended to discard both literature and sociology in favour of the semiotics of popular culture. Literature, Culture and Society makes a determined attempt to re-establish the connections between literary studies, cultural studies and sociology. Arguing against both literary humanism and sociological relativism, it provides a critical overview of theoretical approaches to textual analysis, from hermeneutics to postmodernism, and presents a substantive account of the capitalist literary mode of production. This second edition has been fully revised and rewritten, with new sections including the impact of psychoanalysis and post-structuralism, and the recent work of academics such as Franco Moretti. New case studies have been added in order to examine the intertextual connections between Genesis, Milton's Paradise Lost, Frankenstein (in Mary Shelley's original and also in several film versions), Karel Capek's R.U.R., Fritz Lang's Metropolis, Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, The X-Files and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Utopian Literature and Science

P. Selver, in The Brothers Čapek, R.U.R. and The Insect Play (London: Oxford University Press), p. 5. ... is taken from Nigel Playfair's adaptation of the Selver translation of R.U.R. for the English stage; more correctly, the Manager's ...

Utopian Literature and Science

Scientific progress is usually seen as a precondition of modern utopias, but science and utopia are frequently at odds. Ranging from Galileo's observations with the telescope to current ideas of the post-human and the human-animal boundary, this study brings a fresh perspective to the paradoxes of utopian thinking since Plato.

White Heat

Both concepts were explored in the 1923 Czech play R.U.R. , by the brothers Capek , first produced that year at St ... year of R.U.R. , 14 The Brothers Capek , R.U.R. and The Insect Play ( London : Oxford University Press , 1961 ) , p .

White Heat

Technology has been called the art of the twentieth century. It is the expression of everything that makes us human. Our myths and rituals, our fantasies and creativity all find expression in our technology. The ability to forge tools by the fashioning of metal in its 'white heat' state was preceded by the creation of tools in stone. This was the first indication of humanity's capacity to shape and use the raw materials available to it. It reached its peak in the industrial revolution of the nineteenth century and today its momentum can be seen in every part of our lives. It is this combination of technological creativity and human passion which Carroll Pursell pursues in White Heat. Professor Pursell explores technology not as a succession of gadgets and gizmos but as a study of how society's values are embedded in them. Written to accompany a major television series and illustrated with some surprising and fascinating photographs, his book reveals a new layer of meaning to the devices, tools and machines which have been developed throughout human history.